Ride the Chair of Death on world’s highest cliff drop swing

August 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ride the Chair of Death on world’s highest cliff drop swing

Picture it: you jump off a cliff edge 360 feet in the air and plummet past the rocky cliff face until the tension catches, and then you careen across the canyon on the world’s craziest swing . If that sounds like your idea of a good time, then you need to check out the Shotover Canyon Swing in New Zealand – the world’s highest cliff drop. Riders hook onto a 650-foot cable before launching off the cliff. As you fall, you can reach speeds up to 90 mph until your free-fall is arrested by the cable. If stepping off the cliff side isn’t enough for you, you can also choose to ride a bicycle off the cliff, shoot off on a slide, or be tipped over in a plastic chair, known as the “chair of death.” Related: Amazing Tiny Treehouse Boasts the World’s Wildest Swing 8,350 Feet Above Sea Level! Once you master the art of the world’s highest cliff drop, you can add in the “Canyon Fox” option, where you are tethered to two lines 600 feet above the canyon floor. You launch yourself off a sloped ramp, falling until the tether catches you and tosses you across the canyon on a massive zip line . The entire experience, including Swing and Fox ride, will cost you a cool $299 and possibly 10 years off your life. + Canyon Swing Via Thrillist

See original here: 
Ride the Chair of Death on world’s highest cliff drop swing

Trippy transforming coffee table illuminates microscopic art

August 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Trippy transforming coffee table illuminates microscopic art

Thanks to the popularity of tiny home living , flexible furniture is more popular than ever. However, one inventive company is taking it one trippy step forward by adding microscopic art into the mix. Designed by Italian firm Art Is Therapy , the Microcromo is a 3D-printed , transformable coffee table that illuminates with a top of glowing microscopic art. According to Marco Zagaria, creator of the funky 3D-printed table , the inspiration for Microcromo came from the desire to blend multifunctional furniture design with his own love of microscopic art photography. The table tops are created using a series of unique micro-images photographed with the microscope. The images of veiny patterns and vivid colors are backlit with ambient lighting system controlled by an app, creating one very unique art piece within the table. Related: 11 pieces of transforming furniture that work wonders for small spaces Adding flexibility to the design , the table’s telescopic base is retractable so that the table can be almost completely flattened. This feature not only lets homeowners open up their living space quickly, but also means that the table can be hung on the wall as a stand-alone art piece. Zagaria says that the table’s artsy and functional design was inspired by the common confines of living in a tiny space ,  “ As more and more people decide to live in small homes, they must have objects that are more functional while still having a strong impact of design, at the same time.” + Art Is Therapy

Continued here: 
Trippy transforming coffee table illuminates microscopic art

Pathways to a clean energy future: global perspectives

July 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Pathways to a clean energy future: global perspectives

Hawaii, California, and New Zealand share at least one thing in common: they’re all on a path to clean energy. While utilities and regulators serve a defined geographic region, they see many of the same challenges. This opens up a world of opportunities for collaboration – in some unexpected ways.

View original post here:
Pathways to a clean energy future: global perspectives

Day 3 Welcome

July 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Day 3 Welcome

Closing plenary thoughts from the organizer and host.

Read the original:
Day 3 Welcome

The power of transformative change

July 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The power of transformative change

How can we untangle challenges at the nexus of nature and humanity? A holistic “radical remedy of the commons” is within reach. But we need better design thinking and far greater energy and urgency to bring it into being. By transforming markets and scaling enabling technologies, programs, and platforms that offer differentiated solutions for critical, systems-level challenges, we can strengthen the symbiosis between nature and humanity.  

Originally posted here:
The power of transformative change

The Tesla of solar electric yachts launches in New Zealand

June 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Tesla of solar electric yachts launches in New Zealand

The future of boating is electric – and silent. That’s what Dutch company Soel Yachts says, and they’re bringing electric travel to the seas with their SoelCat 12. Inhabitat covered the boat’s design last year , and now the company is launching their sustainably-powered yacht in New Zealand . The yacht is kind to the environment not simply in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions , but in the reduction of noise pollution as well. The SoelCat 12, which was built in New Zealand, is powered by the sun. Soel Yachts describes the boat as the ‘ Tesla on the water,’ noting while cars are transitioning over to being powered by electricity , the same movement largely hasn’t occurred in boating. They want to revolutionize the boating industry, and are debuting the SoelCat 12, designed in partnership with Naval DC , in Auckland, New Zealand this week. Related: Solar-powered yacht sails silently for a cleaner, greener eco-tourism experience The company says it wasn’t enough to just stick an electric motor on a boat. They kept electric propulsion in mind as they designed the SoelCat 12, evidenced for example in the highly efficient lines of the hull. Traveling at a speed of eight knots, the yacht can run simply on battery power for six hours. Reducing the speed to six knots, the boat can travel for 24 hours – even at night when the yacht’s solar panels aren’t harvesting energy. The boat’s systems can be monitored on a phone or tablet, allowing boaters to see their energy use as in a Tesla, according to Soel Yachts. Soel Yachts co-founder Joep Koster said in a statement the SoelCat 12 “reduces all disturbing sound and CO2 emissions in our harbors, lagoons, and oceans .” The solar electric yacht quietly glides through waves, minimizing disturbance in the form of noise pollution to marine life. And the yacht is still useful even when it’s not in use. Soel Yachts says the boat can become a mobile power station, offering energy for as much as five homes, even in remote locations. + Soel Yachts + Naval DC Images courtesy of Soel Yachts

Continued here: 
The Tesla of solar electric yachts launches in New Zealand

New Zealand’s solar-powered Te Oro Music and Arts Center is inspired by traditional Maori design

July 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New Zealand’s solar-powered Te Oro Music and Arts Center is inspired by traditional Maori design

The Center was built in a suburban car park which the architects redesigned with a master plan that includes four key facilities on the southern edge. Te Oro, Ruapotaka Marae, Glen Innes library and a Community Hall will share a landscaped space which will extend into Maybury Reserve and the re-development of Ruapotaka Marae. Related: Beautiful Roma music center in Hungary shows how socially-conscious design can cultivate talent The building was conceived a large wooden canopy that floats over performance and learning spaces for an ethnically diverse young population. Several hang-out and “kai” spaces, workshop and teaching areas, dance studios, music classrooms, recording studios are combined and connected by a simple looping circulation route. Installed on the roof are 256 solar panels which reduce the energy consumption of the Center by more than 50 percent. Rainwater is harvested and used for toilet flushing and landscape irrigation. Related: Striking Green-Roofed Concert Hall Sprouts in Soignies, Belgium The ground surfaces feature imprinted traditional Maori graphic device – the manaia – which connect different spaces. Three separate volumes of the Center house different functions-performance, music, and visual arts. Local ethnic groups carved the timber blades that face the concrete columns, while a series of LVL portal “ribs” enclosed in a facade of ACP comprises the superstructure. The facade was clad in faceted panels made from solid timber . + Archimedia Photos by Patrick Reynolds

See the rest here:
New Zealand’s solar-powered Te Oro Music and Arts Center is inspired by traditional Maori design

Toward the "Utility of the Future" – Lessons from Australasia

July 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Toward the "Utility of the Future" – Lessons from Australasia

Analogs and parallels between New Zealand, Australia and Hawaii as they all move toward building the “utility of the future”, as seen at VERGE Hawaii 2016.

Read more here:
Toward the "Utility of the Future" – Lessons from Australasia

Project Litefoot: New Zealand’s gamified green-sports movement

March 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Project Litefoot: New Zealand’s gamified green-sports movement

Leveraging the fame of New Zealand sports heroes to spark sustainable behavior in fans.

Continued here:
Project Litefoot: New Zealand’s gamified green-sports movement

Unravelling how to invest in the circular economy

March 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Unravelling how to invest in the circular economy

How do you turn the circular economy from a nice idea into an investable business model?

Go here to see the original:
Unravelling how to invest in the circular economy

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1488 access attempts in the last 7 days.