Futuristic solar fabric canopy reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement

June 28, 2017 by  
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MoMA PS1 just completed one of its most experimental and coolest installations to date. The Long Island City-based contemporary art museum wrapped up construction on Lumen, an immersive and interactive installation made with solar-active canopies that glow at night. Designed by Jenny Sabin Studio , Lumen reacts like a living entity to light, heat, and movement, creating different engaging environments from day to night. Set to open to the public Thursday, June 29, Lumen will be on view in MoMA’s PS1 courtyard during summer 2017. The futuristic canopy was selected as the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program that challenges emerging designers to create a temporary, outdoor installation addressing environmental issues and forward-thinking design. Jenny Sabin Studio designed Lumen with over a million yards of digitally knitted fiber made from recycled photo-luminescent textiles that absorb solar energy during the day and emit glowing hues of blue, pink, and purple at night. The cellular canopies are stretched overtop the courtyard and give the space an extraterrestrial vibe. Suspended from the canopy like stalactites are 250 tubular structures. A hundred robotically woven recycled spool stools are scattered throughout the courtyard like stalagmites. Related: Futuristic canopy made of knitted solar panels wins 2017 Young Architects Program at MoMA During the day, the canopy’s integrated misting system sprays water to cool visitors in hot weather. Lumen’s use of mist for cooling and its multicolored glowing backdrop at night creates a dynamic setting for the 20th season of Warm Up , MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. MoMA PS1 writes: “Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s adaptive architecture is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure transforms throughout the day and night, responding to the density of bodies, heat, and sunlight. The result of collaboration across disciplines, Lumen applies insights and theories from biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering—integrating high-performing, formfitting, and adaptive materials into a structure where code, pattern, human interaction, environment, geometry, and matter operate together.” + Jenny Sabin Studio Images by Pablo Enriquez

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Futuristic solar fabric canopy reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement

How emerging leaders view sustainable business

March 17, 2017 by  
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Check out what our young GreenBiz 17 Emerging Leaders have to say about the world of corporate sustainability.

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How emerging leaders view sustainable business

An investor discusses driving change by doing well

March 17, 2017 by  
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Cary Krosinsky discusses the shift towards value-first impact investing.

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An investor discusses driving change by doing well

The no-brainer case for saving fuel economy standards

March 17, 2017 by  
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4 reasons why the Trump administration should reconsider dismantling our current automotive fuel standards.

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The no-brainer case for saving fuel economy standards

Rusty old ship transformed into a spectacular building filled with plants

July 26, 2016 by  
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Speaking about the pavilion, Shinslab Architecture says: ” Temp’L is designed from recycled steel parts from an old ship. It shows not only a beauty of structure, but it has also a recycling purpose…It provokes thought about beauty in our time, coming from a recent past.” Related: This pop-up rainwater pavilion in Edinburgh is designed to raise awareness about water To create the pavilion, Shinslab Architecture sawed off a section of hull from a rusty ship and placed it upside down. They left the exterior corroded, and painted the interior white. They also added a balcony, a spiral staircase, and trees underneath the hull to create a restful space. Temp’L is located at the entrance of the courtyard at MMCA Seoul. Shinslab Architecture hopes visitors will reflect on recycling and how architects can consider the environment at Temp’L. They said they aim “not only to develop a new method of construction in architecture by recycling materials, but for those who will see to create emotion.” In their description Shinslab Architecture wrote, “Any great cultural vestiges can lose their function. In the same way, a material can also lose its original value over time. The fact that the destiny of cultural relics is to be dismantled, should make us reflect upon what we need to consider for future generations.” The Young Architects Program in Seoul is put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 , along with MMCA. Shinslab Architecture is based in Seoul and in Versailles, France. Claire Shin, Charles Girard, Souho Lee, Camille Chalverat, Javier García González, and Taewoo Ha were all part of the Temp’L project. + Shinslab Architecture + Young Architects Program International Via Dezeen Images courtesy of shinslab architecture and photographer Kim Yong-Gwan

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Rusty old ship transformed into a spectacular building filled with plants

15-year-old develops $12 machine to convert ocean currents into usable electricity

October 28, 2015 by  
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Hannah Herbst is the 15-year-old inventor who developed a low cost method of producing energy from ocean currents . Her idea won her the top prize of the 2015 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge : $25,000 cash. The prototype she built for the competition, a probe that converts the natural movements of the ocean into useable electricity, costs just $12 to make. The ultra-low cost was all part of Herbst’s goal to develop a solution for developing countries, where electricity is sparse and unreliable. The judges apparently agreed her invention is the cream of the crop. Read the rest of 15-year-old develops $12 machine to convert ocean currents into usable electricity

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15-year-old develops $12 machine to convert ocean currents into usable electricity

Stunning layered glass sculptures capture the splendor of the sea

September 14, 2015 by  
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Stunning layered glass sculptures capture the splendor of the sea

9-Year-Old Spanish Boy Wins Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award

November 2, 2014 by  
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London’s National History Museum just announced the winner of the 2014 Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year–and the title-winning photographer hasn’t even hit the double digits yet. Nine-year-old Carlos Perez Naval from Spain wowed the judges with his extraordinary nature shots taken from around the world. From macro close-ups to bugs to closely cropped shots of exotic big cats, Naval started snapping away at age four while on trips with his world-traveling parents and he hasn’t stopped honing his craft since. Click on the link to see his breathtaking photographs. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , carlos perez naval , national history museum , Photography , young wildlife photography of the year

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9-Year-Old Spanish Boy Wins Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award

BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel Upcycles Vintage Trailers and Railcars into Quirky Accommodations

October 18, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel Upcycles Vintage Trailers and Railcars into Quirky Accommodations Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: airstream trailer , basecamp bonn young hostel , Bonn , germany , madonna inn , michael schloesser , pullmain railcar , upcycled materials , vacant warehouse        

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BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel Upcycles Vintage Trailers and Railcars into Quirky Accommodations

Brigham Young University Scientists Create a Tiny Nano-Cupid For Valentine’s Day

February 14, 2013 by  
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Scientists at Brigham Young University (BYU) have used nanotechnology to make the world’s smallest Cupid for Valentine’s Day ! The teeny cupid is made from carbon nanotubes coated with metals and other materials. Just a few hundred nanometers from foot to bow, the tiny cupid is an example of big technology. Read the rest of Brigham Young University Scientists Create a Tiny Nano-Cupid For Valentine’s Day Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Brigham Young University (BYU) , carbon nanotubes , Nano-Cupid , nanofilters , nanomaterials , nanotechnology , nanotubes , scientific research , Utah Innovation Awards , valentine’s day , Valentine’s Day Nano-Cupid

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Brigham Young University Scientists Create a Tiny Nano-Cupid For Valentine’s Day

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