Montana judge to rule on first grizzly bear hunt in 40 years

August 29, 2018 by  
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This week, a U.S. judge will hear the arguments presented by Native American tribes and animal activists for the protection of recently demoted Yellowstone-area grizzly bears from the endangered list. The removal of the grizzlies’ protection status has caused states such as Montana, Idaho and Wyoming to launch trophy hunting expeditions in and around Yellowstone National Park for the first time in over 40 years. All in all, 700 American bears are at risk of staring down the barrel since their elimination from the U.S. List of Endangered and Threatened Species in 2017 under the Trump administration. While some states hailed the decision, along with hunters and ranchers who worried about bears preying on their livestock, Native Americans and conservation groups took matters into their own hands, filing lawsuits with the U.S. courts. “We feel all our beliefs, medicines, ceremonies and ancestral ways of life are being disrespected … because a few people want to kill grizzlies … to mount their heads on walls or make rugs for their floors,” explained Crawford White, part of the Northern Arapaho Elders Society, a Wyoming tribe that is supporting the suit for what it feels is a violation of religious freedom. Related: Movement to save grizzly bears from hunters scores a victory Constituents arguing for the hunt said that they met with tribal leaders before allowing up to 22 grizzly bears to be killed in the scheduled hunt, according to Renny MacKay, spokesperson for the Game and Fish Department . They maintain their stance that grizzly populations have exceeded targets for recovery measures and risk over-pouring into the surrounding area. More than 7,000 people have applied to the lottery system, which is accepting 22 individuals into the hunt, one person for every bear to be killed. Some applicants include individuals in the conservation group “Shoot ‘Em with a Camera, Not a Gun,” which has scored at least one of the 22 licenses. The hunt is set to begin September 1 in Wyoming and Idaho, and groups are impatiently awaiting the trial’s commencement to find out whether or not the state of Montana will join as well. Related: Jane Goodall and conservationists move to obtain bear hunting licences in Wyoming The hearing is set for Thursday, and opponents will meet in the U.S. District Court of Montana. The judge presiding over the case will make the final decision whether to restore protective status to the Yellowstone grizzlies or give them up to the hunt. Via Reuters Image via Yellowstone National Park

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Montana judge to rule on first grizzly bear hunt in 40 years

Movement to save grizzly bears from hunters scores a victory

July 30, 2018 by  
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Thomas Mangelsen, the animal photographer who brought fame to Yellowstone’s “Grizzly 399,” has been selected to receive a hunting license in Wyoming. Mangelsen was one of 7,000 hopeful lottery applicants to appear on the “Issuance List” released on Thursday by the state’s Game and Fish Department. However, unlike the majority of entrants in Yellowstone’s first bear hunt in nearly half a century, Mangelsen hopes to tag his catch in a photo rather than a body bag. Mangelsen’s application was part of the “Shoot ‘Em with a Camera, Not a Gun” campaign, which wildlife activists launched in an effort to lower the number of hunters granted licenses in Wyoming’s bear permit lottery. The randomly selected candidates were drawn in order of when they will be given access to the hunting grounds; only one ticket holder will be allowed in the zone at a time. Each hunter is given a maximum of 10 days to “tag” – that is to say, kill – a grizzly before the next individual is allowed in. The hunt will last either two months or until the quota of 22 kills is met. Related: Jane Goodall and conservationists move to obtain bear hunting licences in Wyoming Mangelsen was happy to report on Shoot ‘Em With A Camera’s Facebook page that he had drawn the eighth slot in the 2018 hunt and would most likely be able to save at least one bear, or possibly more. “The odds of winning a tag were extremely low considering over 7,000 people applied,” the photographer noted. “There are certain circumstances that would keep me from getting in the field, but if given the opportunity, you can be sure that I will be buying the $600 license and spending all of the allotted ten days hunting with a camera. With only one person allowed in the field at one time, hopefully the ten days I take up will save the lives of some of these amazing animals.” Related: Trump administration wants to allow “extreme and cruel” hunting methods in Alaska The activist group was formed in Jackson, Wyoming on account of the bears’ 2017 removal from the Endangered Species Act list of threatened wildlife and the opening of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana’s hunting seasons. The group has raised just over $40,000 to stop the hunting expeditions through their Go Fund Me page and allied themselves with a network of environmental champions such as primatologist Jane Goodall and the Center for Biological Diversity’s Stop the Griz Hunt organization. + Shoot ‘Em With A Camera + Go Fund Me + Stop The Griz Hunt Via NPR and USA Today

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Movement to save grizzly bears from hunters scores a victory

Former coal miners receive training for renewable energy jobs

October 3, 2017 by  
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Over half of the United States’ electricity came from coal in 2000. That figure has plummeted to around one third in 2016, and thousands of coal workers have lost their jobs . But former fossil fuel workers have skills that could translate well to jobs like installing solar panels or working on wind turbines . Other programs teaching former miners computer coding and beekeeping are also aiding the transition away from fossil fuels to a greener future. Coal miners once found roles in West Virginia and Wyoming , and now alternative energy training programs in those states offer new hope. For example, there’s Solar Holler in West Virginia, whose goal, according to their website, is to revitalize Appalachian communities with solar power . They’re working with Coalfield Development to train people to become solar panel installers. Coalfield Development is also rehabilitating buildings and starting an agriculture program, including transforming an old mine area into a solar-powered fish farm, according to The New York Times. Related: The wind turbine manufacturer putting unemployed coal miners to work Or there’s Goldwind Americas , a wind turbine manufacturer offering a training program for coal miners that started earlier this year in Wyoming . The miners could help construct a massive wind farm , and the company will employ up to 200 workers to maintain the farm after it’s built. Appalachian Headwaters is another organization providing an alternative for former coal miners. They’re turning an old camp into an apiary, with the goal of helping coal workers and veterans get a start in the honey business. Next year, they’ll give around 150 hives to 35 workers either for free or with a no- or low-interest loan. Solar Holler founder Dan Conant said diversification is important in the area – the solar program so far only trains 10 workers a year. There are challenges in the transition to a clean energy future, but for now, programs like the ones above offer new training and roles for unemployed miners. Via The New York Times and Axios Images via Bureau of Land Management on Flickr and Coalfield Development Corporation Facebook

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Former coal miners receive training for renewable energy jobs

Red States vs. Blue States: Which Are More Eco-Friendly?

May 18, 2017 by  
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Consider that the most environmentally friendly states are Vermont, Massachusetts, Oregon, Washington and Connecticut, while the lowest are Oklahoma, North Dakota, West Virginia, Montana and Wyoming. Notice a pattern? It turns out that political…

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Red States vs. Blue States: Which Are More Eco-Friendly?

Wyoming lawmakers launch bill that would ban selling renewable energy

January 17, 2017 by  
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In a move that puts the “R” in regressive, a group of Republican lawmakers in Wyoming just launched a bill that would effectively ban selling wind and solar power in the state. The measure proposes to fine utilities for purchasing energy produced by large-scale renewable power projects. According to Inside Climate News , the bill is chiefly sponsored by representatives from the state’s main coal-producing counties. If enacted, it would force utilities to use power from only approved energy sources like natural gas, nuclear power, hydroelectric, oil – and of course coal. Your average homeowner could still install a rooftop solar, backyard wind or other renewable energy setup, but the state’s utilities would get slapped with big fines for buying power from renewable projects. According to Inside Climate News, the move is confusing some locals who know the lay of the land. “I haven’t seen anything like this before,” said Shannon Anderson, director of local organizing group, Powder River Basin Resource Council . “This is essentially a reverse renewable energy standard.” But Inside Climate News adds that Republican Senator David Miller, the bill’s sponsor, says the goal of the legislation is to make sure Wyoming residents have access to inexpensive power. Related: Judge orders Exxon-Mobil to disclose 40 years of climate change documents “Wyoming is a great wind state and we produce a lot of wind energy,” Miller said. “We also produce a lot of conventional energy, many times our needs. The electricity generated by coal is amongst the least expensive in the country. We want Wyoming residences to benefit from this inexpensive electrical generation. “He added that he doesn’t want to see Wyoming “averaged into” other states that require utilities to supply “more expensive” renewable energy. The proposed bill would allow renewable energy producers in the state to sell power to customers outside Wyoming without a penalty. The cost of selling power in their own state would be $10 per megawatt hour of energy sold. Republicans significantly outnumber Democrats in both the state’s House and Senate, but Miller still puts his chances of passing the bill at “50 percent or less.” Via Inside Climate News Images via Flickr Creative Commons, Jeremy Buckingham and CGP Grey , Wikimedia Commons

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Wyoming lawmakers launch bill that would ban selling renewable energy

Should we abandon the language of sustainability?

November 12, 2015 by  
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Talking “sustainability” is not easy, is it? Recently, while sitting at a table of Wyoming cattle ranchers, set to give a speech, a rancher’s 10-year-old son looked at me with all his innocence and asked: “What is sustainable beef?” — with a quixotic emphasis on “sustainable.” My panicked answer, later.Then even more recently I heard in an informal discussion with a few corporate sustainability practitioners centered on “how we need to abandon the current language of sustainability.”

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Should we abandon the language of sustainability?

Rural mountain school in Wyoming gets a rugged weathering steel skin

October 30, 2015 by  
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Rural mountain school in Wyoming gets a rugged weathering steel skin

Yellowstone National Park to Kill up to 900 Bison This Winter

September 17, 2014 by  
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Yellowstone National Park just annoucned plans to kill up to 900 bison this winter in an effort to control the size of the park’s herd. Any animals that stray from the park over the winter months will be killed in what could be the largest cull of the US’ last free-ranging pure-bred bison in seven years. Currently, Yellowstone ‘s bison population is estimated at 4,900, and the park hopes to reduce this number to 4,000. Read the rest of Yellowstone National Park to Kill up to 900 Bison This Winter Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: American Indian traditional hunting , animal cull , Bison , buffalo , herbivores , hunting , Idaho , montana , national park management , population control , traditional food sources , wild animals , wyoming , yellowstone national park

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Yellowstone National Park to Kill up to 900 Bison This Winter

GOP Governors: EPA Carbon Dioxide Rules Job Killer

June 18, 2014 by  
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HOUSTON (AP) — Republican governors from oil-and-gas rich states said Monday that new federal rules designed to cut global warming pollution from power plants by 30 percent by 2030 will kill jobs and growth. Texas Gov. Rick Perry hosted Wyoming…

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GOP Governors: EPA Carbon Dioxide Rules Job Killer

Ward + Blake Architects Use Low-Tech Solutions for High Efficiency School Design in Wyoming

February 28, 2014 by  
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Award-winning Jackson Hole architecture firm Ward + Blake Architects received special funding for its energy-efficient design of a new central administration facility for the Teton County School District in Jackson, Wyoming. The new 8,600-square-foot Jackson Hole facility houses conference rooms, a large board room, and office space, and was able to save money for the school district while meeting stringent county sustainable construction standards. Ward + Blake Architects helped the Teton County School District apply for Jackson Hole Energy Sustainability Project funding to help offset the cost of some of the Teton County School District Central Administration Office’s innovative sustainability features, such as the natural gas furnace, intelligent building control system, and dimming sensors. In addition to high-tech sustainable design techniques, architects relied on more low-tech solutions such as daylighting to reduce energy loads and create an enjoyable work atmosphere. + Ward + Blake Architects The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: green design , green schools , jackson hole , low tech , passive solar , reader submitted content , sustainability funding , sustainable design , Teton County School , Ward and Blake Architects , wyoming        

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Ward + Blake Architects Use Low-Tech Solutions for High Efficiency School Design in Wyoming

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