Ultralight NAWA sculpture continually changes its appearance throughout the day

June 27, 2017 by  
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Bionics, art, and public space merge in NAWA, a striking sculpture designed by Oskar Zi?ta of Zieta Prozessdesign for the European Capital of Culture 2016 celebrations. Created to match the celebrations’ slogan of “metamorphoses of culture,” this ultralight mirrored installation changes it appearance, which differs depending on where viewers stand and the time of day. The unveiling of the avante-garde sculpture on Daliowa Island of Wroc?aw in western Poland will take place on June 30, 2017. Inspired by bionic shapes, the 100-square-meter NAWA comprises 35 steel arches of varying sizes to create an openwork gate through which people can walk. The polished steel arches reflect the changing surroundings, thus giving the sculpture a continually changing appearance. The choice of arches is also a reference to the nearby landmarks including the Ossolineum, the church’s tower at Piasek, Wroclaw Market Hall, and Ostrów Tumski. “NAWA opens another chapter in the history of the Daliowa Island, returning it to the dwellers of Wroclaw,” wrote Zieta Prozessdesign. “The space is currently being revitalized and very soon will serve the city, becoming a bustling, open space for meetings, concerts and artistic events. Sculpture along with planned vegetation will create a consistent organic unity, emerging naturally from the river. At the same time, the realization will fit perfectly into the architectural order of the area and its vibrant life, full of tourists and passers-by.” Related: Tiny Mirrored Cabin Reflects the Ontario Landscape NAWA is ultra-lightweight thanks to FiDU, an innovative technology developed by Zieta Prozessdesign that distorts welded steel with compressed air. Almost 52 tonnes of steel and a million cubic meters of air were used for the sculpture. In addition to the installation of NAWA, around 7,500 new plants will be seeded on Daliowa Island. + Zieta Prozessdesign

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Ultralight NAWA sculpture continually changes its appearance throughout the day

NeSpoon adorns urban spaces with oversized doily art

October 4, 2016 by  
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NeSpoon’s creations have recently embellished various walls, streets and public parks around Poland , New Zealand and France. Aesthetically, they draw inspiration from traditional embroidery, yet the different creations are made using ceramic, rope or a stencil, and a spray can. The ‘urban jewelry’ can be imprinted on the wall, can take shape as an  aerial sculpture or as a doily detail on a wall. Related: NeSpoon’s Delicate Doily Art Adorns a Stretch of the Baltic’s Oak Beach Each piece is handmade by the artist herself or with the hand of traditional folk artists with whom she works. NeSpoon explains her passion for lace : “In lace there is an aesthetic code which is deeply embedded in every culture. In every lace we find symmetry, and some kind of order and harmony. Isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively?” + NeSpoon Via This is Colossal

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NeSpoon adorns urban spaces with oversized doily art

Affordable DublDom prefab home pops up in just one week

October 4, 2016 by  
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Completed for a budget of $42,500, this particular DublDom 2.65 model offers 65 square meters of space with enough room for two spacious bedrooms, a veranda, and common areas. Like all of BIO Architects’ modular homes , the EcoPark home was built mostly from wood for a cozy and welcoming feel. Large double-glazed windows let in natural light and frame panoramic views of the outdoors. “Our task was to organically enter the house in the natural surroundings, produce it in a short period time and cause minimum damage to the environment during the installation,” write the architects. “The architecture of the house is as much as possible open to the environment and interact with it. From the large living room you can see the endless fields and small river, two bedrooms behind the house are made for sleep. Layout of the house provides maximum exposure to the nature and to spend time with friends in the living room or on the veranda.” Related: Tiny and Affordable Russian DublDom Home Can Be Assembled in Just One Day The light-filled gabled home is minimally decorated with black metal and unpainted larch that line the exterior and parts of the interior. BIO Architects offers five different configurations of the DublDom 2.65; the Eco-Park client chose DublDom 2.65-01, which includes a spacious front veranda that wraps around the sides of the home and includes a small terrace in the rear; an open-plan kitchen, living, and dining area; a bathroom; and two equal-sized bedrooms. The house is elevated on stilts and was installed on site in seven days. + DublDom Images via DublDom , by Bokaeva Louise and Ivan Ovchinnikov

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Affordable DublDom prefab home pops up in just one week

This new rocket thruster is powered by space junk

October 4, 2016 by  
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What do Australia, space junk, and the journey to Mars have in common? Well, that sort of remains to be seen. Over the next year, the International Space Station will be testing rocket propulsion technology developed by an Australian team that is fueled by space debris and could—someday—help us get to Mars. This new innovation centers on an ion thruster that could replace current chemical-based rocket propulsion technology. Since it is designed to make use of abundant space junk as a fuel source, it is not only efficient but potentially cost effective (with the handy side effect of cleaning up of some of that celestial garbage in the process). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TVipU98g9s Dr Patrick “Paddy” Neumann is a graduate of the University of Sydney and he partnered with two professors from the college to develop an ion thruster (aptly dubbed the Neumann Drive) that aims to give current rocket propulsion technology a run for its money. The invention led to his founding of Neumann Space , a start-up working to further develop and advance the technology. The Neumann Drive uses solid fuel and electricity to produce thrust, in “a ‘wire-triggered pulsed cathodic arc system’ that works kind of like an arc welder,” according to the company’s website. Related: Elon Musk reveals his big plans for colonizing Mars This addresses one of the key issues SpaceX CEO Elon Musk mentioned last week during his detailed unveiling of his Mars plan: the need to refill while in orbit. Chemical-based rockets require enormous amounts of fuel to travel the long distance to Mars, so it isn’t logistically possible for a rocket to carry all its own fuel, which predicates the need to refuel in space. On the contrary, the ion thruster developed by Neumann and his team eliminates the fuel capacity need, since it utilizes space junk as a fuel source. Among the “junk” the Neumann Drive can use for its propulsion are a number of materials common on Earth, as well as in space. The team touts magnesium as their most efficient fuel, best for longer cargo transport journeys. Aluminum, sourced mainly from space junk, is their best recycled fuel. Carbon, derived from recycled human waste, has also been tested. But the material that tops the list is a more unusual one: Molybdenum . It’s a heavy metal with a high melting point that would have to be sourced from Earth, but a small amount of fuel would last a very long time. “Moly,” as it’s known for short, is the fastest fuel tested so far in the Neumann Drive, and it’s the current favorite for fueling a passenger ship to Mars. Via ABC Australia Images via Neumann Space and Wikipedia

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This new rocket thruster is powered by space junk

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