Wearable garden vest is nourished by wearer’s own urine

January 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Wearable garden vest is nourished by wearer’s own urine

Are you looking to spruce up your wardrobe this spring? Well, we’ve got the season’s eco-fashion garment for you — a wearable garden vest that thrives on your urine. Created by designer Aroussiak Gabrielian , the lush “garden cloak” concept was inspired as a potential solution to crop scarcity around the globe. With the potential to grow up to 40 crops, the green vest is irrigated by urine filtered through reverse osmosis. According to Gabrielian, the living garments are supposed to reconnect the food producer and consumer in order to foster a more self-reliant and resilient food production system .”The habitats are essentially cloaks of plant life that are intended to provide sustenance to the wearer, as well as flourish as expanding ecosystems that attract and integrate other animal and insect life,” Gabrielian said. Related: New biofabricated clothing made from algae goes through photosynthesis just like plants Recently unveiled at the Rome Sustainable Food Project, each cloak is an individual microhabitat made up of several layers. The multi-layered system is made up of moisture-retention felt and a drip and capillary irrigation layer, followed by the sprouting plant system . The living ecosystem layer is made up of plants, including herbs, greens, fruits, vegetables, legumes and fungi, that require sun and water as inputs. Another layer is made up of pollinators , which are essential to creating a fully sustainable crop output. The garden vests are outfitted with an integral system that recycles human waste, primarily urine. Collected via a built-in catheter, urine is stored, filtered and used to irrigate the plants. An innovative osmosis system, originally developed by NASA, converts urine into water by draining it through a semi-permeable membrane that filters out salt and ammonia. Working with a team made up of microgreens researcher Grant Calderwood, fashion designer Irene Tortora, Chris Behr from the Rome Sustainable Food Project and collaborator Alison Hirsh, Gabrielian’s  innovative project was made possible thanks to funding from the American Academy in Rome. Additionally, the grow lights were donated by PHILIPS. + Aroussiak Gabrielian Images via Aroussiak Gabrielian

View original here:
Wearable garden vest is nourished by wearer’s own urine

Quorn introduces carbon footprint labeling

January 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Quorn introduces carbon footprint labeling

In a trailblazing move, Quorn, the meatless food manufacturer headquartered in the U.K., is now leveraging carbon labeling on more than half its product line. Carbon labeling delineates where greenhouse gas emissions are associated with production, manufacture, distribution and transport of a particular consumer product as it is brought to market. The carbon label serves to inform consumers of an item’s environmental impact and carbon footprint. By reading carbon labels, consumers may be motivated to make better and more sustainable choices. Quorn’s pioneering carbon footprint data is certified by the Carbon Trust. Why is carbon labeling important? Any increase in a product’s carbon footprint has environmental repercussions — like climbing temperatures, shifting precipitation patterns, rising sea levels and increasing frequency of extreme weather as well as species vulnerability and threats to biodiversity. Carbon labeling provides a rating system that scores the environmentally friendly and socially responsible characteristics of a product, so consumers can make better choices that ultimately lead to smaller carbon footprints. Related: Alliance of more than 11,000 scientists warns that our planet faces a climate emergency Quorn’s products are considered healthier and more sustainable. Why? The company does not utilize any livestock. As its website explains, a nutritious soil fungus ferments to produce mycoprotein. Mycoprotein is high in protein and fiber, while being low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Interestingly, mycoprotein’s carbon footprint is 90% lower than beef’s. “For over 30 years, we have been proudly delivering Healthy Protein for a Healthy Planet,” a spokesperson for Quorn said. “Quorn is proven to provide significant health and environmental benefits, and today we’re delighted we can offer carbon footprint data to our customers. This is about giving people the information needed to make informed decisions about the food they eat and the effect it has on our planet’s climate — in the same way that nutrition information is clearly labeled to help inform decisions on health — and we’re asking other brands to get on board with us.” The labels will appear on some products, including the mince, crispy nuggets, sausages, fishless fillets, ultimate burgers and wonder grains, starting in June 2020, with the entire line of products featuring the new labels starting in 2021. + Quorn Via The Guardian Image via Quorn

Read the rest here: 
Quorn introduces carbon footprint labeling

Ethiopia’s worst drought in 30 years leaves over 10 million people hungry

December 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ethiopia’s worst drought in 30 years leaves over 10 million people hungry

Ethiopia is experiencing its worst drought in 30 years as the direct result of El Niño . In a developing nation with a perpetually unstable food supply, severe drought has created food shortages for as many as 10 million people, up from last month’s estimate of 8 million. This update comes as the country is in the midst of ongoing epidemics, including an outbreak of measles in October. Read the rest of Ethiopia’s worst drought in 30 years leaves over 10 million people hungry

See the original post: 
Ethiopia’s worst drought in 30 years leaves over 10 million people hungry

What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic)

October 27, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic)

How many times have you bought a bunch of bananas only to have them go brown in a matter of days? And how many times have you thrown away wilted salad? Kitchen designer Noel Dempsey sent over this food waste infographic, which outlines just how much perfectly good food the Irish throw away each year. Even though this particular study addresses the behavior of Irish households, we think it’s globally relevant. For example, one study finds that reducing food waste could feed an additional one billion people . Hit the jump to check out this illuminating infographic about food waste, and let us know in the comments what we can do to prevent this disturbing trend. Read the rest of What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic) Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: food thrown away , food waste , infographic , infographic about food waste , ireland food waste , obesity , reader submissions , UK food waste , user generated content , wasting food , world hunger

The rest is here:
What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic)

INFOGRAPHIC: Why We Should All Eat Insects

June 20, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on INFOGRAPHIC: Why We Should All Eat Insects

Though some may balk at the proposal, eating insects can change the world for the better. They’re efficient to produce, healthy, and absolutely delicious. They take only 8-10% of the resources needed for the production of beef and emit 9% of the CO². Adopting them in our diet can help fight both world hunger & global warming. The Grasshopper Suppliers is a new initiative that’s aiming to kickstart a food revolution by breaking the main barrier preventing it: the cost of edible insects. Check out their infographic to learn more, and support them on Kickstarter ! + The Grasshopper Suppliers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eating bugs , food , food sources , global warming , grasshopper suppliers , green design , infographic , insects , sustainable design , sustainable food , why we should eat insects , world hunger

Excerpt from: 
INFOGRAPHIC: Why We Should All Eat Insects

France’s 2015 World Expo Pavilion Challenges World Hunger with a Farm-to-Table Design

May 2, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on France’s 2015 World Expo Pavilion Challenges World Hunger with a Farm-to-Table Design

Read the rest of France’s 2015 World Expo Pavilion Challenges World Hunger with a Farm-to-Table Design Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2015 milan world expo , 2015 world expo , farm to table , feeding the planet energy for life , france great market , france pavilion , french pavilion milan world expo , french pavilion world expo 2015 , great market , hops , hydroponic vegetables , hydroponics , timber frame , vaulted ceilings , world expo milan , world hunger , xtu architects

View original here:
France’s 2015 World Expo Pavilion Challenges World Hunger with a Farm-to-Table Design

Using Crops to Feed People Instead of Cows and Cars Could Substantially Reduce World Hunger

August 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Using Crops to Feed People Instead of Cows and Cars Could Substantially Reduce World Hunger

Image via Shutterstock Currently 36 percent of the food produced worldwide is used to feed animals, according to new research published in Environmental Research Letters . The study found that halving the amount of corn, soy and other grains we use for biofuel or to raise meat could feed an additional two billion people around the world. And while it might not have been mentioned, having less cows on the planet could substantially reduce methane emissions that contribute to climate change too. Read the rest of Using Crops to Feed People Instead of Cows and Cars Could Substantially Reduce World Hunger Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agricultural productivity , biofuel , corn , crops to feed humans , Drought , food for people not cows , food waste , greater food efficiency , soy , world hunger        

Excerpt from:
Using Crops to Feed People Instead of Cows and Cars Could Substantially Reduce World Hunger

UN Report Says We Should Be Eating More Bugs

May 13, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on UN Report Says We Should Be Eating More Bugs

Photo via Shutterstock Let them eat… cockroaches? In an effort to address world hunger, the Food and Agriculture Organization  of the United Nations recently published a report suggesting that insects are a viable source of protein for humans, animals and pets. The report picks grasshoppers, ants and other bugs as protein-packed meat substitutes that are less harmful to the environment than traditional meat. Read the rest of UN Report Says We Should Be Eating More Bugs Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , Edible Insect Program , edible insects , green design , insect eating , meat substititute , sustainable design , United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization , world hunger        

Go here to see the original: 
UN Report Says We Should Be Eating More Bugs

Bad Behavior has blocked 8256 access attempts in the last 7 days.