Selgascano designs plant-filled creative office campus for Second Home Hollywood

June 26, 2019 by  
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London-based creative business Second Home is opening its first U.S. location that’ll deliver bold designs and a lush, jungle-like environment to Los Angeles. Set to open in September 2019, Second Home Hollywood will transform the historic site of the Anne Banning Community House in East Hollywood into an inspiring, 90,000-square-foot urban campus for creatives and entrepreneurs. Designed by Madrid-based firm Selgascano , the adaptive reuse campus was conceived as an “indoor/outdoor wonderland” with bold and brightly colored spaces that draw inspiration from Southern California’s architectural legacy. Second Home Hollywood marks Second Home’s sixth site created in partnership with Selgascano and will host 250 diverse organizations and teams in a dynamic, plant-filled environment that’s a contemporary interpretation of L.A.’s early 20th century bungalow court residences. The campus will include the first U.S. branch of Second Home’s critically acclaimed bookshop Libreria; a 200-person auditorium; post-production facilities; a publicly accessible restaurant and roof deck; outdoor terraces; 30 interior studios and offices; and 60 single-story, oval-shaped garden studios unified under a sinuous yellow roof plane. As with Second Home’s creative workspaces in London and Lisbon, Second Home Hollywood will also feature unconventional materials, bold furnishings and an abundance of foliage — the L.A. campus will include 6,500 plants and trees that will transform the existing 50,000-square-foot parking lot into an urban woodland. The plantings selected will include 112 different drought-tolerant species native to Southern California. ‘Smart Controller’ technology will be used to optimize irrigation strategies and save water. Other environmentally friendly aspects include the use of cross-laminated timber in the workspaces, reclaimed bricks and materials and the semi-subterranean placement of studios to help reduce the need for heating and cooling. Related: Striking London workspace wraps offices in bubble-like acrylic walls To celebrate the opening of Second Home Hollywood in September, Second Home is partnering with the Natural History Museums of Los Angeles County to temporarily install the Second Home Serpentine Pavilion by Selgascano at La Brea Tar Pits, where it will be on display from the end of June to November. The five-month installation will be accompanied with cultural programming open to the public. + Selgascano Images via Second Home

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Selgascano designs plant-filled creative office campus for Second Home Hollywood

Architects transform barns into solar-powered workspaces for Dutch daredevil

April 10, 2017 by  
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Rotterdam-based architecture studio Instability We Trust transformed two barns into a set of contemporary workspaces for the famous Dutch daredevil, Wim Hof . Nicknamed “The Iceman” for his ability to withstand extreme cold, Hof commissioned the adaptive reuse project to house his training seminars on the health benefits of cold exposure and breathing techniques. Located in Barneveld in the eastern Netherlands, the solar-powered building juxtaposes two visually contrasting volumes: an “extraverted” glass house and an “introverted” wooden cave-like structure. The L-shaped building comprises two interconnected gabled structures with open and flexible interiors. The gabled glass house is almost entirely transparent with an “outward atmosphere which relates to the air,” whereas the gabled timber-clad structure has a “grounded atmosphere which relates to the earth.” Though the timber volume is without windows, its connection with the glass structure allows access to natural light . Large sliding doors open the volumes up the outdoors and permits natural ventilation. Related: Historic Dutch nursery transformed into stunning solar-powered home Vertical planks of larch sourced from the sawmill next door clad the enclosed cave-like volume. The two gabled end walls were custom-made from clay plaster to create a warm and earthy environment that, combined with the suspended light sculpture, makes the space ideal for meditation. Photovoltaic cells and thermal cells generate renewable energy on site. “A visually clean and calm appearance is accomplished by combining an array of different elements such as insulation, gutters, drainage pipes, sliding door rails, glass panels and structural beams into one carefully detailed wooden slatted element, almost like a click-on facade,” write the architects. + Instability We Trust Via ArchDaily Images via Instability We Trust , © Pim Top

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Architects transform barns into solar-powered workspaces for Dutch daredevil

Office with arched openings shows off the beauty of cross-laminated timber

March 29, 2017 by  
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Increasing numbers of architects are celebrating the strength, beauty, and sustainable properties of cross-laminated timber . Japanese architecture firm Junichi Kato & Associates shows off how the timber can be used as both a structural and finishing material in the Santo CLT Office. Built in Japan’s Shiga Prefecture, this nearly 140-square-meter office building houses warm and welcoming workspaces with arched openings. Inspired by the climbing kiln in Shigaraki, a town famous for ceramics, Junichi Kato & Associates introduced an arch -shaped continuous frame into the building structure. A raised wooden terrace wraps around two sides of the building and is partly shaded by the roof overhang. The walls and floors are constructed from cross-laminated timber, while foam insulation and low-e glass improve energy efficiency. Related: Taiwan’s first CLT building paves way to greener alternatives to concrete and steel The office is entered from the west and visitors are immediately greeted with an exhibition space, reception desk, and a small informal meeting area. A wall divides the entrance area from the large working space in the center of the building. The night-duty room, shower, and toilet are located in the rear. Large windows fill the office with natural light which, coupled with the ample use of wood, gives the office its cozy and welcoming character. + Junichi Kato & Associates Via ArchDaily Images by Kei Sugino

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Office with arched openings shows off the beauty of cross-laminated timber

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