Young couple build their own tiny home to avoid sky-high housing prices in the Bay Area

May 29, 2019 by  
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The San Francisco Bay Area is notoriously expensive for both renters and buyers. But one enterprising young couple has found a way to live in the beautiful city on their own terms by building their very own tiny home . Nicolette and Michael spent just seven months constructing their dream home. Although it is only 300 square feet, it comes complete with a sleeping loft, a full kitchen and a little reading nook for the studious couple. The young couple was inspired to build their own home for a number of reasons. With Michael being a full-time student at CAL, they had to stay in the Bay Area; however, after realizing how expensive the area is, they decided to enjoy the financial freedom that comes with building their own tiny home. Additionally, they were inspired to live a more eco-friendly lifestyle where they could reduce their footprint on the planet. Related: This tiny home allows a family of 3 to go off the grid in Maui As they set out on their tiny home journey, the amateur — but ambitious — builders decided to do most of the work themselves, accepting help from family and friends along they way. Built on a 28-foot long trailer, the home is clad in metal and wood siding with plenty of windows that flood the interior with natural light . According to Nicolette, the interior design was inspired by an industrial farmhouse aesthetic. The home is bright and airy with white walls and high ceilings. To the left, the living room is compact but comfortable with a loveseat that pulls out into a futon. A beautiful silicon-gel fireplace keeps the space warm and cozy during the winter months. The main wall is clad in floor-to-ceiling bookshelves that provide plenty of storage space. At the heart of the couple’s tiny home design is a sweet little reading nook that was built onto the end of the structure, past the main living area. With two large windows that open, this space is perfect for snuggling up with a good book or creating artwork. Between the living space and the kitchen, the couple installed a work/dining space consisting of two desks under a wall of windows. On the other side of the space is a compact metal kitchen area along with an oven with a four-burner stove and even a full-size refrigerator. A barn-yard door separates the living space from the bathroom, which has a full shower and vanity along with a composting toilet . Above the kitchen space is the sleeping loft accessible by a metal ladder. White shiplap walls along with two horizontal windows turn the tiny space into a soothing oasis. + Nicolette Notes Via Apartment Therapy Images via Nicolette and Michael

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Young couple build their own tiny home to avoid sky-high housing prices in the Bay Area

8 sustainability podcasts to listen to this Earth Day

April 22, 2019 by  
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Give your daily commute a boost by subscribing to an eco-friendly podcast. Not only do these podcasts make your drive pass by a little faster, but they will also keep you informed on the latest trends in sustainability — just in time for Earth Day . Here is a quick list of the best sustainability podcasts for your morning drive. Sustainable Jungle This podcast tackles current and future problems in the environmental realm. The hosts of the podcast, Lyall and Joy, tour the planet to discuss big issues with some of the world’s leaders in conservation, tackling issues like plastic waste , climate change and overconsumption, to name a few. Although the people they meet are focusing on different areas of conservation, they are all working together to build a better world. Organic Healthy Life This podcast is led by Nancy Addison and focuses on healthy eating. In each episode, Addison dives into recipes that are tailored to benefit the entire body and mind. According to Player FM , Addison’s clients have experienced substantial improvements to their health by following her advice. This includes weight loss and improved medical conditions. Related: 6 fun, meaningful ways to celebrate Earth Day! Addison is the author of several award-winning books, including Raising Healthy Children ; Lose Weight, Get Healthy And Never Have To Go On A Diet Again ; and How To Be A Healthy Vegetarian . The Minimalists Starring Ryan and Josh, The Minimalists podcast examines sustainability through a slightly different lens. Being minimalists, the pair often talk about how they live a more fulfilled life by decreasing what they own. They also discuss their impact on the environment and how modern living affects Earth’s delicate ecosystem . Ryan and Josh frequently take questions from the audience and offer an inside look at what it really means to be a minimalist. My Ocean The My Ocean podcast interviews leaders in the conservation community whose main focus is on preserving the ocean. This podcast will undoubtedly leave you inspired about the good in people while offering an interesting look at some of the problems facing our oceans today. If you are looking for feel-good stories about people making positive impacts on the oceans, this podcast is definitely for you. The Adaptors This podcast is for listeners who are looking for interesting twists on sustainability. The Adaptors frequently introduces ideas that are hypothetical and bordering on ridiculous, but they still make you think about sustainability in a different way. One of the common questions on the show is how environmentalists would adapt to some of the most damaging effects of climate change . Although the answers are sometimes outlandish, they are often inspirational. Warm Regards Warms Regards may be one of the most passionate podcasts on this list. The hosts often interview journalists and climate scientists who are dedicated to their work in a way most of us could only dream of being. The podcast focuses on climate change and the effects of global warming . This includes exploring ideas on how to deal with global warming and what might happen in the future if proper steps are not taken to deal with the issue. Direct Current Direct Current will appeal to those looking for environmental discussions with elements of comedy. The main topic on Direct Current is electricity and the many ways humans generate and use energy around the world. The discussions often feature human elements and explore new trends in technology that are driving the renewable energy revolution. Fast-paced and always fascinating, this podcast is perfect for those looking to solve old problems in unique and inventive ways. Hippie Haven Hippie Haven releases an episode every Wednesday, and each one is sure to teach you something new about sustainable living. Led by host Callee, this podcast interviews ordinary people who follow  eco-friendly lives . The guests typically offer real-world solutions while telling people how they can get involved in the environmental community. Related: These sustainable headphones are making a debut just in time for Earth Day The topics on Hippie Haven are diverse and include anything from becoming a vegan to building a tiny home . The topics change each week, so you never know where the conversation might take you. Being a long-time activist and small business owner, Callee also brings plenty of experience to the table and is never afraid to discuss even the most controversial of issues. Mountain And Prairie Mountain and Prairie could definitely be your next favorite podcast. Ed Roberson hosts the show and talks with a myriad of guests from the American West. The topics tend to focus on issues that ranchers and hunters face, but they always come back to conservation. Even if you are not an expert on the environment, you will find the discussions on this sustainability podcast both significant and illuminating. Via Player FM , 1 Million Women and The Basic Goods Images via Pexels , Kaboom Pics , Matthieu A , Tomasz Gaw?owski  and  Photo Mix Company

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8 sustainability podcasts to listen to this Earth Day

Azulik, an eco-paradise in Tulum, celebrates the four natural elements

February 28, 2019 by  
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The four elements of earth, fire, water and air are reflected in every material, design and spa offering throughout the campus of the Azulik eco resort in Tulum, Mexico. With the goals of conservation and fair-trade at every turn, Azulik is a 48-villa haven of relaxation built seamlessly into the jungle and along the postcard-perfect shoreline of the Caribbean Sea. All of the villas are hand-built from wood with eco-friendly materials sourced locally. There are a range of accommodation styles, each centered around one of the four natural elements, with a focus on relaxation, rejuvenation and healing. Each villa contains a traditional Mayan mosaic tile or volcanic stone tub, extra king-sized beds, mosquito nets and immersive views. Some are intricately interwoven into the surrounding jungle while others hover on the edge of the Caribbean Sea. Some special features exclusive to select villas include outdoor hot tubs, private stairways and even a 24/7 butler service. One obvious omission from the villas is electricity, including a lack of television, radios, Wi-Fi and lights. Related: This breathtaking Tulum art gallery was created by Peggy Guggenheim’s great-grandson The lack of electricity highlights the natural aspect of Azulik, noted by the candle-lit walkways and rooms. It’s not difficult to absorb the natural surroundings with walkways that meander throughout the property. These walkways are designed around existing trees for preservation. Nestled along the gorgeous Caribbean, the property also houses a cenote that feeds traditional mineral water into the villa bathtubs (sorry, no showers here). The on-property wetlands area provides water purification, flood control, carbon sink and shoreline stability. When you drag yourself away from your villa, you can explore the property and the surrounding area through the Mystikal Wanders program, which immerses guests in a unique blend of culture, nature and local history. Follow a tribe guide to meet a traditional shaman and Mayan family, swim in the mineral waters of the cenote and explore the Mayan jungle and ruins. Participate in meditation, paddle yoga, spiritual rituals and massages, or get away on a catamaran to snorkel and explore the sea. On site, take in the IK Lab, an environmentally-conscious art gallery that highlights the work of a variety of local and resident artists. The spa offers a variety of options to disconnect from hurried modern life with processes that highlight spiritual heritage and natural healing. Experience biomagnetism, a temazcal, medicinal music circles, workshops, shamanic chant, yoga, sound massages and human design techniques for memories exclusive to Azulik. While this eco-paradise offers an array of memorable culinary, art, spa, cultural and historical experiences, it won’t come cheap with a price tag ranging from $700-$7000 per night. + Azulik Images via Azulik

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Azulik, an eco-paradise in Tulum, celebrates the four natural elements

10 Tips for Staying Waste-Free at Work

February 26, 2019 by  
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It’s tough to keep your environmental impact to a minimum … The post 10 Tips for Staying Waste-Free at Work appeared first on Earth911.com.

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10 Tips for Staying Waste-Free at Work

Valser is using carbon capture technology to carbonate its beverages

December 28, 2018 by  
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Valser, a Coca-Cola-owned brand of sparkling water based in Switzerland, is embracing new climate capture technology. Coca-Cola HBC Switzerland (the bottling plant that makes Valser) has partnered with Climeworks, a pioneering company that captures carbon dioxide, to use the new technology to carbonate its water . Climeworks has already partnered with a greenhouse that uses CO2 to help plants grow faster, and since the beverage industry is one of the only existing markets that uses carbon dioxide , it seemed like the natural next step. But, the technology won’t stop there. Christoph Gebald, co-founder and director of Climeworks, says that other applications are coming, including making carbon-neutral fuel or concrete to make plastic , shoes and fish feed. But, it’s the greenhouse and beverage industries that use carbon dioxide on a large scale, and this is how Climeworks hopes to scale up its technology. At Climeworks plants, the company uses its one-of-a-kind  technology to capture CO2 inside shipping containers by pulling air inside of them and then processing it through filters — working almost like an incredibly powerful tree. When a filter gets full, the team heats the collector and release the gas in a pure form so it can be injected into deep underground storage. Related: Google Street View cars will map air pollution in cities worldwide The amount of carbon dioxide in the air is higher than it has been for millennia (about 400,000 years to be exact), and this new process from Climeworks will help address this problem. But, putting the CO2 into beverages instead of underground still allows the fizz to come out when you open the bottle. To help impact climate change , the amount of carbon dioxide we need to remove from the air could be around 10 billion tons per year — according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change — and the global food and beverage industry produces about 6 million tons annually. So there is still a long way to go. “The beverage industry is really the bridge from today — no existing market — to enabling us to further work down our cost curve and industrialize the technology,” says Gebald. “It’s really the missing bridge between startups and, one day, climate-relevant scale to remove carbon from the air.” Sucking carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is currently a more expensive option than resorting to other sources, but it does make sense for some locations. Once the technology becomes cheaper, it will become a more attractive option for other businesses. Via Fast Company Images via ExplorerBob

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Valser is using carbon capture technology to carbonate its beverages

Harbor town in Germany unveils urban-chic hostel made out of repurposed shipping containers

December 28, 2018 by  
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Berlin-based Holzer Kobler Architekturen and Kinzo Architekten have collaborated on Germany’s first upcycled hostel and its nothing short of spectacular. The Dock Inn is made out of multiple repurposed  shipping containers that have been carved out to create 64 guest rooms which all feature a vibrant interior design that mixes urban chic with industrial charm. Located in Warnemünde, Germany, the Dock Inn shipping container hostel is surrounded by the local harbor and shipyard. According to the designers, the rough charm of the industrial location was the perfect place to pay homage to the shipping containers’ former life at sea. Related: Gorgeous Catalan building renovated into an eco-friendly hostel in Barcelona The hostel design used the industrial nature of the containers to create a modern, contemporary hostel with a vibrant urban feel. A maritime theme runs throughout the space, which is filled with reclaimed furnishings, to pay homage to the containers’ seafaring past. The hostel’s various shipping containers were configured in a way to house 64 rooms with 188 beds, with most looking out over the harbor. There are varying sizes of guest rooms, from private rooms to dormitory-style spaces that have eight single beds. The rooms are compact, but with sleek interiors that give off a sophisticated, contemporary aesthetic. Bright red walls contrast nicely with all white linens in some rooms, while upholstery made of natural materials in muted colors give off a nice earthy feel in other rooms. Throughout the interior, large windows allow natural light to flood the interior spaces. The hostel also has a number of social areas such as a large lounge, computer room, galley kitchen, on-site restaurant and even a spa on the rooftop level. Throughout the common areas, the designers used several reclaimed materials such as the old shipping pallets that were configured into ample seating space in the lounge. + Holzer Kobler Architekturen + Kinzo Architekten + The Dock Inn Photography by Max Schroeder and Sebastian Dörken

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Harbor town in Germany unveils urban-chic hostel made out of repurposed shipping containers

Study finds microplastics in sea turtles around the world

December 12, 2018 by  
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The microplastics problem in the oceans has made its way to sea turtles in a big way. A new study from researchers at the University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory along with Greenpeace Research Laboratories has found microplastics in the guts of every single turtle they tested — a total of 102 sea turtles. The researchers tested more than 100 sea turtles from all seven species and three different oceans , and they were looking for synthetic particles less than 5 mm in length. The most common thing the team found were fibers, which most likely came from clothing, tires, cigarette filters and fishing equipment. Related: Microplastics have made their way into human poop “The effect of these particles on turtles is unknown,” said lead author Emily Duncan from the University of Exeter’s Center for Ecology and Conservation. “Their small size means they can pass through the gut without causing a blockage, as is frequently reported with larger plastic fragments.” Duncan added that future work should focus on the effects of microplastics in aquatic organisms , and researchers should look for possible contaminants, bacteria or viruses as well as how the microplastics affect turtles on a cellular level. The researchers found more than 800 synthetic particles in the turtles , but since they only tested part of the gut, they believe the total number of particles could be 20 times higher. They don’t know how the turtles ingest the particles, but they think the sources are polluted seawater and the digestion of polluted prey or plants. Professor Brendan Godley, the senior author of the study, said that the ingestion of microplastics isn’t the biggest threat to sea turtles at the moment, but it is a clear sign that we need to do a better job governing global waste . Penelope Lindeque from Plymouth Marine Laboratory said that during their work over the years, researchers have found microplastics in all of the marine animals they have studied. This turtle study is just more evidence that we need to reduce the amount of plastic waste, so we can maintain clean and healthy oceans for future generations. + University of Exeter Image via Jeremy Bishop

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Study finds microplastics in sea turtles around the world

Here’s your opportunity to join the Inhabitat team as a writer!

November 28, 2018 by  
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Inhabitat, a leading website in green design and sustainable living, is seeking remote writers to contribute two or more articles per week with a focus on breaking environmental news, green design/architecture and/or sustainable lifestyle features. An ideal candidate is an avid environmentalist and excellent writer with the ability to meet deadlines and communicate professionally with editors and sources. Learn more below. Requirements: Ability to meet strict deadlines Understanding of design and environmental trends and terms Excellent communication skills Familiarity with AP Style Strong grasp on grammar and writing mechanics Experience interviewing sources Passion for the environment and sustainability Pay: $20 per 300-word news story $30 per 300-word gallery story $50 per 800-word feature story Higher compensation available for stories with original photography and/or interviews Potential traffic bonuses of $150-$300 per story! To Apply: Send us an email (editor@inhabitat.com) with a short explanation as to why you are interested in joining our team as well as which types of stories you’d be interested in contributing (news, design and/or features). Please include at least one relevant writing sample and a resume. We look forward to hearing from you! Image via Rawpixel

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Here’s your opportunity to join the Inhabitat team as a writer!

A 1972 Airstream becomes a bright, 198-square-foot home for a family of four

October 16, 2018 by  
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Minimalist living in a tiny home is quite common for a couple, but when designing a compact space for a family of four (plus a fur baby), strategic planning is essential. When Colleen and Zachary Cashio purchased a 1972 Airstream trailer that was just 31 feet long, they knew they had a big renovation project on their hands, but they took it head on with some impressive DIY skills. Today, the Steady Streamin’ Cashios is a space-efficient, sophisticated home, which was handcrafted to meet the needs of the family. At one time, the Cashio family was following the path toward the “American Dream” when they had a revelation — they needed to simplify . The couple realized that they wanted to teach their two kids about the importance of enjoying life and experiences without the distractions of material things. Related: Artist revamps dingy interior of a 1962 Airstream with vibrant florals The big chance to renovate their lifestyle came in the form of a 1972 Airstream Sovereign. Naturally gifted in the DIY department, the ambitious couple did all of the work on the Airstream conversion themselves. After buying the trailer, they gutted the interior and started with a hollowed-out shell. In the process, they did find a few structural issues, but they were able to take off the shell and fix some of these problems thanks to Zach’s welding skills. The trailer was then outfitted with a new electrical system (thanks to Colleen’s father and father-in-law) with LED lighting , new ultra-efficient windows and an elastomeric reflective rooftop coating to insulate and cool off the Airstream’s interior. Once the basics were all in place, they began to layout the design  of their new living space. They decided to go with a black and white color scheme that added a contemporary feel to the living space. All-white walls and natural light open up the compact space, and strategic storage was installed wherever possible to curb clutter. The living space is light and airy with a sofa nested into the curved shape of the trailer. The sofa has ample storage underneath for kids toys, magazines and more. The kitchen, which is quite large for a tiny home of this size, was installed with a black and white backsplash and wooden countertops to add a modern touch. The bedroom, which fits a king-sized bed, is located past the kitchen and bathroom. You can follow the family’s journey in their sleek, minimalist Airstream home on their website or Instagram . + Steady Streamin’ Cashios Via Apartment Therapy Photography via Colleen Cashio

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A 1972 Airstream becomes a bright, 198-square-foot home for a family of four

Studio Roosegaardes laser light art tracks floating space waste in the sky

October 12, 2018 by  
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A dazzling neon green light show is illuminating the night skies in Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde’s latest large-scale art installation, the Space Waste Lab Performance. Created as part of the Space Waste Lab , the performance uses real-time tracking information to render the space waste floating above our heads visible with bright green LEDs that follow the movement of the drifting waste. The series of live installations kicked off on October 5 in the Dutch city of Almere and aims to call attention to the problem of space waste as well as sustainable upcycling solutions. According to Studio Roosegaarde, there are currently more than 29,000 items of space waste  — approximately 8.1 million kilograms worth — floating around the earth. Classified as objects greater than 10 centimeters, the waste comprises anything from parts of broken rockets to chipped-off satellite pieces. The drifting junk poses a danger to current satellites and can disrupt digital communications, however there is no clear plan on how to fix the growing issue. In response, the Dutch design studio launched Space Waste Lab with support from the European Space Agency to bring attention to the issue and find ways to upcycle the waste into sustainable products. The Space Waste Lab Performance that launched early this month marks the first phase of the living lab. Created in compliance with strict safety and aviation regulations, the large-scale light show uses cutting-edge software and camera technology to track pieces of drifting space waste in real time with high-powered, neon green LEDs that project a distance of 125,000 to 136,000 miles. “I’m a strong believer in cooperation between technologists and artists,” said  ESA Director Franco Ongaro about Space Waste Lab. “Artists not only communicate vision and feelings to the public but help us discover aspects of our work which we are often unable to perceive. This cooperation is all the more important when dealing with issues like space debris, which may one day impact our future and our ability to draw maximum benefits from space. We need to speak in different ways, to convey not just the dry technological aspects of technology, but the emotions involved in the struggle to preserve this environment for future generations.” Related: Daan Roosegaarde unveils mind-expanding 295-foot SPACE installation in Eindhoven Space Waste Lab will be open to the public at Kunstlinie in Almere until January 19, 2019 and is complemented by the “Space @ KAF” exhibition next door. The Space Waste Lab Performance will be exhibited after sunset on the nights of October 5 and 6; November 9 and 10; December 7 and 8; and January 18 and 19, 2019. The surrounding street and commercial lights will be turned off at those times to enhance the experience. Phase 2 of the program begins after January 2019 and will study ways to capture and upcycle space waste. + Studio Roosegaarde Via Dezeen Images via Studio Roosegaarde

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Studio Roosegaardes laser light art tracks floating space waste in the sky

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