Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape

June 21, 2018 by  
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Optical illusions go hand-in-hand with architecture, but this tiny cube structure by  Matt Thitchener Architect  truly hovers over the landscape — with some help from embedded supports. Cantilevered on a hill, the North Avoca Studio is completely powered by the large array of  solar panels  on its roof. Located just southeast of New South Wales, North Avoca is an idyllic coastal neighborhood. Architect Matt Thitchener designed the 645-square-foot cube to be both an office and entertainment space for a family who primarily works from home. The studio is merely steps away from the family’s main residence. Related: Tiny Space-Age LoftCube Prefab Can Pop up Just About Anywhere The structural design of the studio was primarily influenced by the challenging landscape. Very steep terrain as well as limited building space required the team to embed 20-foot pillars into the bedrock to create a cantilevered design . Also due to the complexity of the location, building materials for the project had to be craned in piece by piece. The result, however, is a gorgeous multi-use space that looks out over the Pacific Ocean. Clad in dark corrugated Spandek panels, the exterior is modern and sleek. The otherwise monolithic structure is only interrupted by an entire glazed wall that provides the interior with natural light and breathtaking ocean views. The studio’s roof is covered in solar panels , which provide 100 percent of its energy. It’s also equipped with a rain harvesting system that is used to irrigate the garden planted under the structure. The interior of the home counts on an open floor plan to provide ultimate flexibility for different uses. The design is contemporary and airy, also providing an appropriate feel for any occasion. The space can be used as a work studio during the day, but can be easily be converted into an entertainment area for friends and family at night. + Matt Thitchener Architect Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Matt Thitchener Architect and Keith McInnes Photography

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Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape

Abandoned greenhouse transformed into gorgeous glass office filled with trees

April 10, 2017 by  
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Architecture firm O-office converted an old abandoned greenhouse in Guangzhou, China into a dreamy glass office space with filled with living plants. The architects paid homage to the building’s green roots by infusing the space with tons of sunlight and loads of greenery – including three trees that grow up into the interior space from the ground floor. Using the building’s original concrete portico, the architects recreated the entryway with pockets of mini gardens. The office space was designed for a local landscape design firm so the designers wanted to create an intimate space that evokes a small “village-like” work environment. Using the greenhouse’s original layout , the interior is flooded with natural daylight and ventilation, which reduces the energy usage of the building . Related: Nature-filled office takes over a former factory building in Amsterdam-Noord The interior of the office space is divided into two floors. The bottom floor is designed for team collaboration, while the upper floor has separate spaces for independent work. All of the interior, however, has an open-air feel to the space, which is naturally ventilated thanks to multiple timber-framed windows. Large concrete stairs with pockets of greenery lead from the central atrium to the upper floor and three large heteropanax trees grow up through the interior , further connecting the building to nature. + O-office Architects Via Architizer

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Abandoned greenhouse transformed into gorgeous glass office filled with trees

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