Chteau La Coste adds a solar-powered cottage designed by Jean Prouv

July 10, 2019 by  
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Chateâu La Coste is known as one of the world’s most innovative art and architectural escapes. Located in fairytale-esque Provence, the 600-acre property is comprised of biodynamic vineyards and a winery designed by architect Jean Nouvel, among countless works of art and designs by other notable names. Now, the famed Chateâu has added another incredible property: a solar-powered luxury suite inside a refurbished Jean Prouvé-designed one-room shelter. Self-taught architect and designer Jean Prouvé is known as one of the great modernist masters. In 1944, he famously created a design for demountable, 6-meter-by-6-meter temporary shelters. Related: Group of friends build a DIY cabin retreat, complete with suspended tree decks Now, a refurbished version of this shelter design holds court in a serene pine forest as a solar-powered luxury suite for guests lucky enough to stay at the Chateâu La Coste. The Suite N° 30 is a one-bedroom studio space clad in natural wood paneling . The structure’s front entrance is through an open-air platform with ample room for seating. Blue-framed glass doors open up to the interior space, which, like the exterior, boasts an off-grid cabin feel. The interior of the suite is filled with midcentury furniture from the likes of Pierre Jeanneret and Serge Mouille, among others. While the cabin mainly stays true to the original design, the suite has an added bathroom and kitchen. This is not your ordinary kitchenette — it is a cylindrical pod designed by none other than Richard Rogers . The pod houses a solar-powered kitchen, complete with all of the amenities needed to put together a tasty meal. The tiny cottage is an important addition to the sprawling art estate, not only for its design prowess, but as a way of keeping Prouvé’s legacy alive. “Prouvé is as important as Le Corbusier, although completely different in terms of scale and ambition,” said Daniel Kennedy, director of Château La Coste’s Art Centre. “We wanted to offer the adventure of living inside a completely autonomous nomadic house and make it function as a hotel, which meant adding phone lines, light switches, softer lighting, bathrobes and filling up the kitchen fridge like a mini-bar.” + Château La Coste Via Wallpaper Images via Château La Coste

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Chteau La Coste adds a solar-powered cottage designed by Jean Prouv

This rustic tiny home on wheels spans just 90 square feet

July 3, 2019 by  
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When it comes to tiny home design, sometimes it’s the itsy-bitsy spaces that show us how to live big. The Vancouver-based designers at Backcountry Tiny Homes have proved just that with a gorgeous tiny home on wheels that measures merely 16 feet long. Although incredibly compact, savvy design strategies, including oversized windows and a charming front porch, give The Acorn a certain character that overcomes its small stature. The Acorn tiny house, part of the company’s Mountain Series, is designed for the adventurer in us all. Perfect for either a weekend cabin in the mountains or an off-grid home near the beach, this tiny home is a great fit for just about any lifestyle. Related: Basecamp tiny home boasts a large rooftop deck for mountain-climbing couple and 3 dogs The tiny home ‘s exterior is clad in a honey-toned knotty cedar with a bit of black metal siding. A charming front porch gives the residence a welcoming vibe. The cabin’s interior is just 90 square feet but manages to pack a lot of punch into the space. A major factor in its sophisticated design is the multiple oversized windows that let in ample natural light and connect the living space with the outdoors. Adding to the rustic charm is the wooden interior with Alpine Backwoods flooring and tongue and groove spruce paneling on the walls. The home boasts a small living room with a comfy sofa that folds out into a queen-sized mattress. On the opposite wall, a small table that can be used for dining or working folds up when it is not in use. High up on the walls, just under the ceiling, is a wrap-around shelf for storage . Additional storage is found in the nooks and crannies throughout the home. The bathroom is more than big enough for such a small space and comes with a full-sized shower, toilet and a vanity cabinet. The kitchen is a tight squeeze but offers all of the basic amenities as well as one major surprise. Hooked up to the kitchen is a built-in Sweepovac vacuum system that is the perfect amenity for keeping the tiny space tidy. According to the designers, the Acorn comes with tight insulation that makes it feasible for almost any climate. Additionally, the tiny home can be custom-designed with additional features such as off-grid capabilities . + Backcountry Tiny Homes Via Tiny House Talk Images via Backcountry Tiny Homes

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This rustic tiny home on wheels spans just 90 square feet

Architects design gorgeous forest-enveloped home with lounge space on its green roof

March 4, 2019 by  
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Brazilian firm, MF+ Arquitetos have unveiled a beautiful wooden home design with a massive open-air lounge on its sprawling green roof. Located in a lush green forest outside of Madrid, Casa Spain is a 6,400-square-foot family home built to be a refuge in the woods. Designed to seamlessly blend into its forestscape and natural topography, the home’s heart is located on its dual-level green roof, which comes complete with a lounge area and fire pit. Although the gorgeous family abode is tucked into a forest, the home design was inspired by the homeowners’ desire to re-create a bright and airy beach home, but surrounded by greenery instead of ocean views. The result is a spectacular forest refuge that is fully integrated into its surroundings thanks to its contemporary volume and natural building materials. Related: Green-roofed home cantilevers over a remote mountainside in Argentina Using the building site’s natural environment as inspiration, the designers choose to create a organic volume made up of glass, stone, wood and concrete. Made up of two overlapping and perpendicular volumes, the home was strategically orientated to make the most out of the views. Both of the home’s levels make use of the wooden-clad eaves and panels of folding brise soleil to reduce solar heat gain and provide natural ventilation throughout the interior. The bottom level of the home sits on a small hill with an expansive stone platform that wraps around the ground floor. Large floor-to-ceiling glass panels open up to the outdoors and flood the interior with natural light . The upper level of the home is a smaller recessed volume that opens up to the roof of the bottom level, revealing a spectacular green roof that sits up high in eyeline with the dense tree canopy. With a large dining table, lounge area, fire pit and native vegetation, this outdoor terrace space is definitely at the heart of the home’s design. + MF+ Arquitetos Via World Architecture Images via MF+ Arquitetos

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Architects design gorgeous forest-enveloped home with lounge space on its green roof

Oceans are dubbed the ‘ultimate sink’ for plastic waste

March 4, 2019 by  
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Plastic waste has officially reached the deepest levels of the world’s oceans, which are now being dubbed as the ultimate sinks for pollution. Scientists discovered organisms that had ingested microplastics at the bottom of the Mariana trench, which descends over 6,000 meters. The Royal Society Open Science journal published the findings of the study, concluding that all marine environments have now been affected by plastic waste. Many of these microplastics come from substances that do not biodegrade quickly and make their way to the ocean via landfills. Once they reach the ocean, the plastics break down even further and float to the bottom. Related: Point Nemo, the most remote spot in the ocean, is plagued with plastic Scientists are well aware of the impact plastics have on shallow marine environments, where the waste is a choking hazard for seabirds, whales and dolphins. But nobody thought the problem to be as widespread as the study showed. Scientists captured creatures from six different locations deep on the ocean floor. The researchers examined organisms from the Japan trench, Mariana trench , Izu-Bonin trench, Peru-Chile trench and the New Hebrides and Kermadec trenches. Microplastics were discovered in all six locations. Some of the plastics that were ingested included lyocell, ramie, polyvinyl, rayon and polyethylene. The deeper the scientists looked, the more contamination they found. This is largely due to the fact that the waste has nowhere to go once it reaches the bottom of the ocean and cannot be flushed out. “It is intuitive that the ultimate sink for this debris, in whatever size, is the deep sea,” the study concluded. It is unclear how much these microplastics are harming deep sea ecosystems. Scientists believe the waste is more harmful at lower depths, because organisms that thrive in these environments often eat whatever they come across. While scientists continue to do more studies, researchers admitted that it is depressing finding so much plastic waste in a place where humans have such little contact yet are making the biggest impact. Via The Guardian Image via TKremmel

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Oceans are dubbed the ‘ultimate sink’ for plastic waste

This geometric cabin in Slovenia is a perfect romantic getaway for nature-lovers

October 23, 2018 by  
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For those looking to enjoy a serene glamping retreat, this tiny geometric cabin in Slovenia is a dream getaway. Located near the region of Maribor, the itsy-bitsy wooden hut is designed to blend seamlessly into the natural landscape thanks to a large glazed front wall that looks out over the expansive rolling hills. Guests can enjoy the fresh air while swinging from a hammock on the wooden deck or soaking in the hot tub. Guests of the tiny cabin , which starts around $170 per night, will enjoy the modern simplicity of the design. A geometric volume expands the space of the compact interior while adding character to the overall aesthetic. The floor-to-ceiling windows on the front facade were used to connect the interior with the exterior. Of course, the swinging hammock on the front deck is the best way to enjoy the panoramic views of the rolling green hills, mountains and valleys that surround the cabin. Related: This itsy-bitsy treehouse in Norway offers the ultimate off-grid escape The cabin comes with everything needed for a romantic getaway for two. The interior is small with just a queen-sized bed, but it is flooded with natural light . There are also a few tables and shelves for personal belongings. The bathroom is located just a few steps away, and linens and towels as well as bathrobes and slippers are all provided. The best part of the tiny cabin is the wooden deck that has a hammock as well as a small sitting area to enjoy the views. This deck is perfect for a morning cup of coffee or a glass of wine in the evening. Guests can also enjoy a community fire pit onsite as well as a large fireplace for barbecues. As an extra bonus, the hosts provide a breakfast basket every morning, filled with products from local farms . + Glamping Hub Via Apartment Therapy Images via Glamping Hub

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This geometric cabin in Slovenia is a perfect romantic getaway for nature-lovers

A cluster of wooden cabins create a serene weekend retreat in Norway

May 10, 2018 by  
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Norwegian firm Stinessen Arkitektur built this cluster of wooden cabins that peer out over the picturesque fjords of Norway. The weekend retreat is designed to provide the ultimate in relaxation, and it features extra-large glazed facades, minimalist interior design, and a serene spa. The private vacation home is located on Malangen Peninsula and it overlooks a beautiful fjord. The main entrance leads through a sliding oak door into a covered central courtyard , which connects the main building and the annex. This courtyard serves as the heart of the home, and it comes complete with a fireplace and an outdoor kitchen. Related: Cantilevered holiday cabins boast stunning coastal views in Norway According to the architects, the courtyard “functions as a protected and semi-tempered zone (without particular heating) between the main part and the annex . . . It also provides an additional layer to the natural ventilation during summertime, even on windy or rainy days.” The main building consists of two living areas. The master bedroom and bathroom are on one side of the structure, and a bedroom and secondary living room are on the other. The open kitchen, dining and living areas are located between the bedrooms. Various “in-between” spaces, with concrete floors and wood-slatted ceilings, connect the individual cabins . In order to create a cohesive connection to the exterior wooden cladding , the interior walls are covered in knot-free oak panels. Minimal furnishings and bare walls put the focus on the incredible scenery that surrounds the home. Each room has a large glass wall that offers amazing views. + Stinessen Arkitektur Via Dwell Photography by Steve King and Terje Arntsen, via Stinessen Arkitectur

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A cluster of wooden cabins create a serene weekend retreat in Norway

This off-grid cabin in the pristine Alaskan wilderness can only be reached by sea or air

March 1, 2018 by  
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If you’re looking for a luxurious off-grid retreat in the middle of nowhere, you’ve come to the right place. Located on Alaska’s remote Alexander Archipelago, the spectacular Hidden Bay Retreat is a three-bedroom timber home with a copper roof that sits on the water’s edge. Stunning views of the pristine wilderness and wildlife can be enjoyed from the home’s covered porch or better yet, from the infinity-edge hot tub. At 2,382 square feet, the home is a large space, built for maximum enjoyment of the surrounding nature. Constructed out of old growth Western Cedar , the home combines the best of rugged exterior materials with a sophisticated interior design. The copper roof was built with oversized eaves that extend out over the roof to create a series of covered terraces. These seating areas are prime wildlife viewing areas, but the infinity-edge hot tub is definitely the best place to catch the bald eagles and ravens that commonly soar around the home. Related: Lakeside cabin made out of reclaimed wood is as idyllic as it gets The interior design was also created to blend a bit of rustic with sophistication. Timber panels line the walls and an abundance of windows lets in optimal natural light and offers stunning views from the chimney-warmed living room. A double-height ceiling opens up the main living space, which leads to a chef’s kitchen and dining area. Three bedrooms are located on either side of the elongated structure and there is also a large, six-person sauna for those bone-chilling Alaskan winters. The landscape around the home, which opens up to the rocky shore of Hood Bay, has been left in a natural state to fully appreciate the beauty of the untouched wilderness and wildlife . The natural ecosystem is home to a variety of animals from bald eagles and snow geese to brown bears and deer. The waters are filled with a variety of fish and, further up the bay, Humpback Whales, Killer Whales, and Sea Lions are regular sites to see. If this all sounds like your cup of tea, it can be yours for $2.5 million (!). + Hidden Bay Retreat Via Uncrate Images via Sotheby’s International Reality

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This off-grid cabin in the pristine Alaskan wilderness can only be reached by sea or air

The Origin Treehouse has an amazing interior that will blow your mind

January 19, 2018 by  
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Paris-based firm Atelier LAVIT just unveiled a beautiful treehouse with a surprisingly sophisticated twist. The octagon-shaped Origin Treehouse wraps around a hundred-year-old oak in a lush canopy of treetops. While some treehouse designers take a more rustic approach to their interiors, the French architects went another route, creating a living space that provides hotel-like comfort – and it even features a heated spa and lounge area. The Origin Treehouse consists of two structure: a platform with a heated spa and a lounge area that sits on a lower level. The second structure is a soaring “birds nest” that’s hidden by the lush foliage. High up in the trees, the 250-square-foot treehouse is accessed via a suspended walkway from the first platform. Related: Microsoft unveils amazing treehouse office where employees can brainstorm in fresh air Two large sliding glass doors open up to the living space, whose sophisticated design is certainly unique in the world of treehouses. The interior was based on the principles of hotel design: it’s simple, elegant and clutter-free. The interior walls are lined with light poplar panels, giving the space a clean, bright feel. Just past the living space lies a small sitting area, a bedroom, the bathroom, and a technical closet. The octagonal shape of the treehouse allowed the architects to install plenty of large windows, which flood the interior with natural light. Those wanting to get even closer to nature can take a wooden ladder from the back deck to a stunning rooftop terrace that provides panoramic views of the forest. According to the architects, the cabin’s unique design was meant to blend into the serene forestscape: “Origin Tree House discreetly stands out among the centenarian oaks of the Château de Raray forest, as if it had always been part of the scenery. Majestic and elegant, it integrates and completes an already impressive landscape, sublimating it by offering a shelter.” + Atelier LAVIT Via Contemporist Photography by Marco Lavit Nicora

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The Origin Treehouse has an amazing interior that will blow your mind

Water-based AC cools the air without using harmful chemicals

January 19, 2018 by  
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Our air conditioners still draw on principles that are around 100-years-old, sucking up power in the process. Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) are working on an alternative: water -based air conditioners. Their system doesn’t need energy -intensive compressors or harmful chemical refrigerants – and can cool air all the way down to 18 degrees Celsius, or 64.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Over 40 percent of the energy consumption of a building in the tropics goes to air conditioning, according to NUS associate professor Ernest Chua . He led a team to develop a new air conditioning system offering several advantages over conventional machines commonly found in buildings today. Related: This amazing Bangladeshi air cooler is made from plastic bottles and uses no electricity Water serves as the coolant in their air conditioner, and an innovative membrane technology sucks moisture out of humid air. The system uses up around 40 percent less electricity than compressor-based air conditioners, which NUS said translates to an over 40 percent reduction in carbon emissions . And the system doesn’t release hot air, instead discharging a less-humid cold air stream. For every liter of water used, as much as 15 liters of drinking water can be harvested, according to NUS – and the water the system harvests from the air is five times purer than Singapore tap water. Chua said in a statement, “Our cooling technology can be easily tailored for all types of weather conditions, from humid climate in the tropics to arid climate in the deserts. While it can be used for indoor living and commercial spaces, it can also be easily scaled up to provide air-conditioning for clusters of buildings in an energy-efficient manner.” NUS said it’s cost-effective to produce the system. Right now the team is further developing the design to boost user-friendliness, and aim to incorporate smart features like real-time tracking of energy efficiency or “pre-programmed thermal settings based on human occupancy.” They’re hoping to collaborate with industry partners on commercialization. Via National University of Singapore and Futurity Images via National University of Singapore and NUSLife on YouTube

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Water-based AC cools the air without using harmful chemicals

Y-shaped timber cabin on stilts overlooks Norway’s picturesque mountains

September 26, 2017 by  
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Oslo-based architect Lund Hagem has unveiled a beautiful wooden cabin that juts out over the slopes of Norway’s Kvitfjell ski resort. The timber structure – which was built on stilts to reduce the cabin’s footprint – stretches out into an elongated Y shape, creating the illusion that it’s floating over the mountaintop. The beautiful structure stands on stilts on one of the highest buildable plots in the resort and is surrounded by soaring birch and pine trees. The orientation and Y shape of the cabin were strategic to providing clear views towards the southeast, which are especially enhanced thanks to the stilts that support the two extending prongs that house the living area and master bedroom. Related: All-black timber Geilo Cabin makes the most of the winter sunlight The cabin’s glazed walls and timber slat cladding are strategic parts of the design. “Our design process was inspired by the client’s desire to have ‘a summer cabin in a winter landscape’,” explained the studio. The timber exterior is separated from the home’s glazed walls by a fun indoor-outdoor walkway that wraps around the structure. The home’s strong connection to its surrounding environment continues on into the living space, where every room offers stunning views. Rustic oiled oak boards make up the flooring and ceiling throughout the home. One prong of the Y-shaped cabin contains the living area, which is furnished with cozy fleece-covered chairs and a hanging, wood-burning stove. The second prong of the Y shape houses the master bedroom and bathroom, while the home’s three additional bedrooms make up the base of the Y shape. In addition to the main house, the architects constructed a smaller annex, also set on stilts , adjacent to the main home. “By placing two volumes close to the neighboring limits, a kind of a courtyard was created,” they continued. “This way, the outdoor spaces could benefit from privacy from the neighbors, while still benefiting from the west/evening sun, during Easter and summer.” + Lund Hagem Via Dezeen

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Y-shaped timber cabin on stilts overlooks Norway’s picturesque mountains

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