Office with arched openings shows off the beauty of cross-laminated timber

March 29, 2017 by  
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Increasing numbers of architects are celebrating the strength, beauty, and sustainable properties of cross-laminated timber . Japanese architecture firm Junichi Kato & Associates shows off how the timber can be used as both a structural and finishing material in the Santo CLT Office. Built in Japan’s Shiga Prefecture, this nearly 140-square-meter office building houses warm and welcoming workspaces with arched openings. Inspired by the climbing kiln in Shigaraki, a town famous for ceramics, Junichi Kato & Associates introduced an arch -shaped continuous frame into the building structure. A raised wooden terrace wraps around two sides of the building and is partly shaded by the roof overhang. The walls and floors are constructed from cross-laminated timber, while foam insulation and low-e glass improve energy efficiency. Related: Taiwan’s first CLT building paves way to greener alternatives to concrete and steel The office is entered from the west and visitors are immediately greeted with an exhibition space, reception desk, and a small informal meeting area. A wall divides the entrance area from the large working space in the center of the building. The night-duty room, shower, and toilet are located in the rear. Large windows fill the office with natural light which, coupled with the ample use of wood, gives the office its cozy and welcoming character. + Junichi Kato & Associates Via ArchDaily Images by Kei Sugino

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Office with arched openings shows off the beauty of cross-laminated timber

This showroom in China looks like a piece of paper floating on water

December 5, 2016 by  
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The design of this showroom and management office in China was inspired by a piece of paper floating on water. FMD Architects designed the building as an addition to a large industrial office park in Minhang District, Shanghai, and combined exposed concrete, wood and steel to give it an industrial feel. The designers created the building to look like a piece of paper floating on water, only touching the surface in two points. Its simple structural system comprises a concrete base and core, wooden columns and a sloping roof that shelters a double-height space . Related: Tesla’s Red Hot and Green Los Angeles Showroom The concrete base protects the wood from the elements, while the solid concrete core takes most of the horizontal loads. Additional natural light is introduced through the skylight which also improves natural ventilation . The architects chose to hide all the lights and equipment, leaving exposed only the original concrete, wood and steel joints, giving the entire space an industrial feel. + FMD Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Yinhui Wang

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This showroom in China looks like a piece of paper floating on water

Americas largest modern timber building pieces together like LEGO

November 30, 2016 by  
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The nation’s largest timber building has officially opened its doors in Minneapolis. Designed by Vancouver-based Michael Green Architecture and Architect-of-Record DLR Group , the seven-story tower is the first modern wooden building of its kind to have been built in over 100 years. Created from prefabricated timber panels, the 224,000-square-foot building’s structural system was quickly pieced together like LEGO blocks on-site at a speed far exceeding conventional steel-framed and concrete buildings. Located in Minneapolis’ North Loop neighborhood, T3 mimics its historic warehouse neighbors with its blocky shape, but steers clear of the heavy bulk. The wooden building’s structural system—mostly cross-laminated timber and nail-laminated timber—weighs approximately one-fifth of similarly sized concrete buildings. 180,000 square feet of timber framing was installed in less than 10 weeks. The majority of the wood is beetle-kill pine sustainably harvested from the Pacific Northwest. The prefabricated timber panels were combined with a spruce glulam post-and-beam frame, all of which sits atop a concrete slab. Related: White Arkitekter wins bid to design Sweden’s tallest timber building The 224,000-square-foot mixed-use building houses office and retail space in a light-filled modern interior that celebrates the timber construction. “The entire timber structure of T3 was left exposed and illuminated with a percentage of the interior lighting directed up to the ceiling,” said Candice Nichol, MGA Associate and T3 Project Lead. At night, “the illuminated wood glows from the exterior similar to a lantern.” + Michael Green Architecture + DLR Group Images via Ema Peter

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Americas largest modern timber building pieces together like LEGO

Swedish rnsro Timber Town relies on wood to lower its carbon footprint

June 2, 2016 by  
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Created in collaboration with Slättö Förvaltning , the approximately 18,000-square-meter Örnsro Timber Town comprises residential units as well as plazas and other structures for social meetings and recreation. The solid timber-framed buildings will be built to a variety of heights for visual interest. Residents and visitors will be encouraged to walk or bike through the neighborhood along the ‘activity route’ that snakes through the quarter and connects to existing promenade sections along Svartån creek. Related: C.F. Møller’s Solar-Powered Wood Skyscraper Wins HSB Stockholm Architecture Competition “We wish to create an including urban quarter in which the city’s urban and social qualities interact with the park’s organic structures. The proposal illustrates a vision with the objective to create an exciting place in Örebro, of unique value, with innovative architecture ,” said Ola Jonsson, the project architect at C.F. Møller. “For us, it is an obvious choice to choose solid wood for structure as well as façades of wood. In addition to contributing positively to the environment, wood gives us new opportunities to create innovative and value-creating architecture.” + C.F. Møller Images via C.F. Møller

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This Canadian passive house factory was built from its own prefab wood panels

May 27, 2016 by  
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The firm estimates the factory will produce 971 fewer metric tons of carbon dioxide each year, when compared to a facility built from concrete. A heat-recovery ventilation system and incredibly well-insulated walls help reduce carbon emissions, making the BC Passive House Factory as efficient as any of the houses its products build. Screens made from two-by-fours make up the building’s facade, with each side featuring unique spacing between the wood to accommodate its relation to the sun. The firm stated, “The two-by-fours were prefabbed into screens and left unfinished to naturally weather over time.” Natural light from clerestory windows is abundant for the workers inside, creating a warm complement to the wooden walls. The ceiling is an especially unique tribute to responsible construction, as the beams are made from cedar wood felled from a nearby forest fire. Related: Turkey’s first certified Passive House cuts energy use by 90% Recently, the 1,500 square meter site was awarded the coveted 2016 Governor General’s Medal in Architecture . The factory hopes its accolades and commitment to sustainable and energy-efficient design will help to promote the presence of passive houses near and far. +Hemsworth Architecture Via Dezeen Images via Ema Peter

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This Canadian passive house factory was built from its own prefab wood panels

San Francisco resident pays $400 a month to live in a box to avoid ridiculous rent prices

March 31, 2016 by  
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Housing prices in San Francisco are notoriously high, so 25-year-old illustrator Peter Berkowitz designed a box to live in. Measuring just 8 x 3.5 x 4.5 feet, the tiny box takes up the smallest amount of space in his friend’s apartment, and he gets away with paying a fraction of what most renters spend. Read the rest of San Francisco resident pays $400 a month to live in a box to avoid ridiculous rent prices

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Nevis is on track to become the world’s first carbon-neutral island

March 31, 2016 by  
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The Caribbean island of Nevis is on track to become the first carbon neutral island on Earth. Around 12,000 people live on Nevis, and they currently receive about 90 percent of their power via imported diesel – however the 36-square-mile island aspires to transition completely to renewable energy sources in the next ten years . Read the rest of Nevis is on track to become the world’s first carbon-neutral island

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Gorgeous Enseada House is a breezy vacation home in Brazil

March 17, 2016 by  
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Floating Kengo Kuma building clad in cedar strips lands on Tokyo University campus

December 2, 2015 by  
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How thousands of rough wooden logs protect this pavilion from solar radiation

July 22, 2015 by  
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