You can stay in this tiny treehouse made out of locally-sourced materials in Hawaii

October 18, 2017 by  
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Nothing says peaceful solitude like waking up surrounded by lush greenery with birds chirping away in the treetops. And that’s just what you’ll get in this tiny tree cottage  located in Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park. Although compact in size, the 300-square-foot Airbnb getaway feels anything but cramped. Set up ten feet off the ground, floor-to-ceiling windows flood the small space with natural light and provide beautiful viewing of colorful birds flitting about in the native ohi’a and hapu’u trees. Located on the side of the volcano, the tiny retreat offers the ultimate in serenity. The cottage – which was built by a local contractor using locally-sourced materials – is a mere 300 square feet, but the glass french doors and large windows provide a ton of natural light. The light wooden floors along with the vaulted ceiling also add a sense of spaciousness to the interior. Related: 8 inspiring tiny Airbnb homes for a taste of living small Guests will be able to enjoy the basic amenities such as a comfy bed, swinging rattan chair, a fully-equipped kitchen, along with a complete bathroom and shower. For water usage, the house is equipped with an outdoor rain catchment system to store water that is then purified with a UV system and filtered. Although the interior is closely connected to the beautiful surroundings, guests will be able to reconnect with the great outdoors by enjoying the covered lounge area on the ground floor, complete with acacia wood furniture and string lights. + Airbnb

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You can stay in this tiny treehouse made out of locally-sourced materials in Hawaii

World’s first 3D-printed bridge opens in the Netherlands

October 18, 2017 by  
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The Netherlands just made history by officially opening the world’s first 3D-printed bridge. On Tuesday, Dutch officials celebrated the opening of the innovative bridge, which is 8 meters (26 ft) long and located near the town of Gemert. Thanks to reinforced, pre-stressed concrete and 3D-printing techniques, the bridge (which is primarily intended for cyclists) can safely bear the weight of 40 trucks. In total, the structure took just three months to build. Said Theo Salet, from the Eindhoven University of Technology, “The bridge is not very big, but it was rolled out by a printer which makes it unique.” Using 3D-printing techniques, less concrete is used than would be required to fill a conventional mold. Says the official website, “a printer deposits the concrete only where it is needed.” The bridge, which is 8 meters (26 feet) long, spans a water-filled ditch to connect two roads. Though the bridge is intended to be used by cyclists , the BAM Infra construction company determined that it can safely bear loads of up to two tonnes — or 40 trucks — through testing. It took the company just 3 months to build the bridge, which has approximately 800 layers. Related: This twisting tower is made out of 2,000 3D-printed terracotta bricks Said the head of BAM, Marinus Schimmel, in a statement , “We are looking to the future. Schimmel added that BAM is ”searching for a newer, smarter approach to addressing infrastructure issues and making a significant contribution to improving the mobility and sustainability of our society.” This project also established the eco-friendly benefits of 3D printing. “Fewer scarce resources were needed, and there was significantly less waste,” said Schimmel. The Netherlands is but one country experimenting with 3D-printed infrastructure. The United States and China, for instance, are using the cutting-edge technology to create structures from scratch without relying on traditional manpower. Elsewhere in The Netherlands, a Dutch start-up called MX3D has started printing a stainless-steel bridge . Reportedly, up to one-third is already completed, and they aim to complete it by March of 2018. Time will reveal what other fascinating, environmentally-friendly structures will be constructed using 3D printing . + Eindhoven University of Technology Via Phys Images via Eindhoven University of Technology

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World’s first 3D-printed bridge opens in the Netherlands

Flexible Una Pavilion is designed to be super stable and easy to construct

January 24, 2017 by  
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All the elements of this multi-purpose pavilion in Brazil contribute to its structural stability and the ease of its construction. Brazilian architecture office Apiacás Arquitetos designed the Una Pavilion using standardized elements, achieving a high degree of programmatic flexibility. The pavilion is located in a residential condominium near São Paulo in Brazil. Surrounded by a lush rainforest with a running stream nearby, the building had to be elevated from the ground in order to avoid flooding. Metal connections were used to assemble the wooden elements, including large pivot doors that make up the facade. Related: Ecocentric cantilevered home was designed to conform to the sloping Brazilian landscape Interspersed wooden slats facilitate a visual connection to the forest, while protecting the interior from excessive sun and rainfall. The minimalist wood furniture follows the constructive logic based on simplicity. + Apiacás Arquitetos Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Leonardo Finotti

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Flexible Una Pavilion is designed to be super stable and easy to construct

Lumberjill hacks stylish bench out of a felled tree trunk

December 30, 2016 by  
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When the designers from Practice of Everyday Design were looking for a unique seating option for a client, they threw out the conventional design process and turned to a professional lumberjill to carve out seats on a reclaimed felled log . Hacked out of pure brute strength and surgical precision, the deep notches on the log were then covered in beautiful red upholstery hand-sewn by a local motorcycle seat maker. Now that’s what we call true artisanal furniture. The bench was a one-off concept piece that the designers had in mind for a specific client. Without relying on drawings or measurements, designers David Long & Antoine Morris came up with an abstract idea to turn a simple log into a physical and functional sculpture . Related: Hilla Shamia casts tree trunks in aluminium to create dramatic furniture They began their material search by contacting the City of Toronto to find out the best places to find local felled wood . After checking out the options at the various tree graveyards and tree nurseries, the team went with a rough log that matched the general dimensions they were looking for. Enter the professional lumberjill, who, working on little-to-no specifics, instinctively used her axe (at competition speed, no less) to strip off the tree bark and hack out three seating spaces. The carved spaces were then covered with a hand-sewn upholstery by a local motorcycle saddle maker, essentially creating a truly one-of-a-kind, reclaimed wooden bench . + Practice of Everyday Design Via Yanko Design

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Lumberjill hacks stylish bench out of a felled tree trunk

Lumberjill hacks stylish bench out of a felled tree trunk

December 30, 2016 by  
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Comments Off on Lumberjill hacks stylish bench out of a felled tree trunk

When the designers from Practice of Everyday Design were looking for a unique seating option for a client, they threw out the conventional design process and turned to a professional lumberjill to carve out seats on a reclaimed felled log . Hacked out of pure brute strength and surgical precision, the deep notches on the log were then covered in beautiful red upholstery hand-sewn by a local motorcycle seat maker. Now that’s what we call true artisanal furniture. The bench was a one-off concept piece that the designers had in mind for a specific client. Without relying on drawings or measurements, designers David Long & Antoine Morris came up with an abstract idea to turn a simple log into a physical and functional sculpture . Related: Hilla Shamia casts tree trunks in aluminium to create dramatic furniture They began their material search by contacting the City of Toronto to find out the best places to find local felled wood . After checking out the options at the various tree graveyards and tree nurseries, the team went with a rough log that matched the general dimensions they were looking for. Enter the professional lumberjill, who, working on little-to-no specifics, instinctively used her axe (at competition speed, no less) to strip off the tree bark and hack out three seating spaces. The carved spaces were then covered with a hand-sewn upholstery by a local motorcycle saddle maker, essentially creating a truly one-of-a-kind, reclaimed wooden bench . + Practice of Everyday Design Via Yanko Design

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Lumberjill hacks stylish bench out of a felled tree trunk

Chinese company LeEco begins building $3 billion electric car factory

December 30, 2016 by  
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Chinese technology company LeEco just commenced construction of a $3 billion electric car factory. The facility could start churning out the company’s LeSee sedan in a few years, producing a staggering 400,000 vehicles by 2018. Roughly 90 percent of the futuristic factory’s work may be completed by robots . LeEco, which currently makes products like televisions, was in trouble. In a November letter to staff, founder Jia Yueting said the company expanded too fast and was struggling, and then cut his own income down to 15 cents. But about two weeks after the letter, the company reported they’d raised $600 million from unidentified investors but proceeded to lay off around 60 Hong Kong employees anyway. Then LeEco received another $1.44 billion investment this past Wednesday, again from an unidentified investor, and broke ground on the factory the same day. It is unclear whether those employees will be re-instated, or of their jobs will be replaced by robots. Related: Elon Musk just confirmed plans for a new Tesla Roadster According to Car News China , LeEco hasn’t yet obtained a government license to produce their LeSee cars at the factory. The outlet even said there’s a “real possibility” the government will refuse LeEco a license, as the CEO isn’t currently popular in Beijing. However, according to the South China Morning Post, a mayor of a city close to the factory said the local government will support the project. Should LeEco obtain permission, the factory is slated to produce the company’s first concept car, the LeSee. Zhang Hailiang, chief executive of LeEco’s car unit LeSupercar, said the factory will be automated completely, as robots do the bulk of the work. The electric vehicle would be equipped to operate autonomously . Fancy features include five in-car screens, smart seating, and the ability to recharge via magnetic charging stations. LeEco said Earth’s topography inspired the LeSee’s design, with the interior influenced by geological and biological patterns. Vegan materials and neutral colors add to the vehicle’s natural feel. According to the company , the form and function of the car “address future needs of our society and showcase a symbiosis between human, machine, and nature.” Via Carscoops and South China Morning Post Images via LeEco

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Chinese company LeEco begins building $3 billion electric car factory

NASA envisions ice dome home for future Mars dwellers

December 30, 2016 by  
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Future Mars dwellers face a tricky architectural challenge: how will structures protect them from radiation in an extreme environment? Experts from NASA’s Langley Research Center , Clouds Architecture Office , and Space Exploration Architecture (SEArch) found a creative answer in ice . They designed Mars Ice Home , an inflatable shelter enveloped in a water ice shell that provides protections and views of the scenery on Mars, and it could be partly repurposed for rocket fuel. The lightweight torus-shaped Mars Ice Home could offer a sustainable, safe home for astronauts on the red planet. With its ubiquitous hydrogen presence, water is especially well-suited to protect humans from galactic cosmic rays – one of the largest risks astronauts face by staying on Mars for an extended time period, according to NASA . The high-energy radiation can damage human DNA and cells, putting astronauts at risk for cancer or acute radiation sickness. Related: Foster + Partners unveils 3D-printed Mars settlement built by robots for NASA competition Water is even easily obtainable on the red planet, giving new meaning to the idea of locally-sourced. Recent NASA research revealed a Mars water ice deposit holds a similar amount of water as Lake Superior . The dwelling could be set up via robotics before astronauts arrive, which is helpful because with the current design, it would take around 400 days to fill the home with water. When it’s time to leave, water from Mars Ice Home could possibly be converted into rocket fuel usable by the Mars Ascent Vehicle. NASA says the home could double as a refillable storage tank as different astronaut groups travel to and off Mars. In the past many researchers pointed to underground dwellings as a solution to architectural challenges on Mars, but the new NASA design eschews that idea in favor of a light-filled residence. Researcher Kevin Kempton said in a statement, “All of the materials we’ve selected are translucent, so some outside daylight can pass through and make it feel like you’re in a home and not a cave…After months of travel in space , when you first arrive at Mars and your new home is ready for you to move in, it will be a great day.” Via NASA Images via NASA/Clouds AO/SEArch and courtesy of Kevin Kempton

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NASA envisions ice dome home for future Mars dwellers

Eden furniture is made from tree branches found in the woods

June 16, 2015 by  
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Everything in the economy revolves around consumption. Manufacturers constantly provide new designs or models, making existing products redundant or old fashioned. This phenomenon causes tons of superfluous garbage and leads to a waste of materials and energy, as well as inflation promoting money traffic. So Studio of Eden decided to create a product made as a reaction against the large-scale waste. Their Eden collection is fully manufactured by hand, from the leftovers of nature: unprocessed tree branches found in the Dutch woods. The branches have been serrated into slices and hollowed out to form the base material. Each individual slice forms a unique puzzle piece that is eventually pieced together into a beautiful and intricate sphere. Each piece is strong enough to withstand the test of time and embodies the earthly paradise where everything is in eternal harmony. + Studio of Eden The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , EDEN , found materials , found wood furniture , lifetime furniture , reader submission , Recycled Materials , renewable materials , Studio of Eden , Sustainable Materials , wood furniture

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Eden furniture is made from tree branches found in the woods

Polar bears are eating dolphins stranded by climate change

June 16, 2015 by  
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Arctic polar bears have been forced to rethink their diet as a result of climate change. No, they aren’t considering vegetarianism to help offset the droughts in other parts of the world. Instead, they have been feasting on frozen white-beaked dolphins who have found themselves trapped in the surrounding ice. This practice was previously unheard of, since this species of dolphin doesn’t usually venture so far north in the Arctic Ocean during the winter or spring months. With fewer seals to hunt, bears in the region are availing themselves of an unexpected source of sustenance. Read the rest of Polar bears are eating dolphins stranded by climate change Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arctic ocean , Climate Change , global warming , polar bear eats dolphin , polar bears , sea level rising , svalbard islands , white-beaked dolphin

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Polar bears are eating dolphins stranded by climate change

Polar bears are eating dolphins stranded by climate change

June 16, 2015 by  
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Arctic polar bears have been forced to rethink their diet as a result of climate change. No, they aren’t considering vegetarianism to help offset the droughts in other parts of the world. Instead, they have been feasting on frozen white-beaked dolphins who have found themselves trapped in the surrounding ice. This practice was previously unheard of, since this species of dolphin doesn’t usually venture so far north in the Arctic Ocean during the winter or spring months. With fewer seals to hunt, bears in the region are availing themselves of an unexpected source of sustenance. Read the rest of Polar bears are eating dolphins stranded by climate change Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arctic ocean , Climate Change , global warming , polar bear eats dolphin , polar bears , sea level rising , svalbard islands , white-beaked dolphin

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Polar bears are eating dolphins stranded by climate change

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