5 Incredibly Tiny & Awesome Mobile Homes

April 17, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of 5 Incredibly Tiny & Awesome Mobile Homes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 6 best , Airstream , Architecture , architecture and vision , automotive , eco-tourism , green mountain college , green transportation , mercuryhouseone , mobile micro-homes , Moby1 , N55 , nomadic life , OTIS , portable house , self-sufficient home , Solar Power , summer house , Timeless Travel Trailers , tiny homes , walking house , XTR

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5 Incredibly Tiny & Awesome Mobile Homes

Neurosurgeons Save a Woman’s Life with the World’s First 3D-Printed Skull

March 28, 2014 by  
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Last year we heard about a man that had 75 percent of his skull replaced with a 3D-printed replica. Now Wired UK reports a woman from the Netherlands has had the entire top section of her skull replaced with a transparent, plastic implant . Neurosurgeons from the University Medical Centre Utrecht performed the extreme procedure to save the woman from a rare chronic bone disorder, which increased the thickness of her cranium from 1.5 centimeters to five centimeters and put her at risk of permanent brain damage. Read the rest of Neurosurgeons Save a Woman’s Life with the World’s First 3D-Printed Skull Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed , 3D printed cranium , 3d printed prosthetics , 3D printed skull , 3D printed skull implant , 3D printing , 3D printing in medicine , plastic , saving a life , University Medical Centre Utrecht        

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Neurosurgeons Save a Woman’s Life with the World’s First 3D-Printed Skull

DIY: How to Maximize Your Growing Space with Keyhole Gardens

March 28, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of DIY: How to Maximize Your Growing Space with Keyhole Gardens Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: compost , Deb Tolman , Dr. Deb Tolman , Dr. Tolman , garden , Gardening , key hole , keyhole , Keyhole garden , keyhole gardening , mandala garden , mandala gardening , permaculture , raised garden , raised garden bed , sustainable permaculture , vegetables        

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DIY: How to Maximize Your Growing Space with Keyhole Gardens

83-Year-Old Woman Gets the World’s First 3D Printed Replacement Jaw

February 6, 2012 by  
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An 83-year-old woman in Belgium is now the proud owner of what could be possibly the coolest lower jaw in history: a 3D printed titanium mandible replacement. The jaw was implanted successfully a few months ago by doctors at the University of Hasselt BIOMED Research Institute in Belgium to replace the woman’s seriously infected jaw bone. The replacement was 3D printed by researchers at the University of Hasselt out of titanium powder. The jaw bone was printed by LayerWise with a new technique called Laser Melting technology which creates a patient-specific bone replacement that will, when the patient has recovered, work much like the jaw-bone her body built. Read the rest of 83-Year-Old Woman Gets the World’s First 3D Printed Replacement Jaw Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d medical printer , 3d print , 3d printer , 3D printing , 3d printing bones , 3d printing for medical use , 83 year old , jaw replacement , medical printing , metal jaw , metal jaw replacement , printing bones , titanium jaw

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83-Year-Old Woman Gets the World’s First 3D Printed Replacement Jaw

What’s more important: less packaging or reusable packaging?

September 9, 2010 by  
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At one point during the cheese course thing at the weekend, the topic of conversation turned to packaging. For us hobbyist cheese makers, it’s not an issue but for the guy running the course and the woman hoping to set up a small scale cheese company, it’s an important thing to consider: balancing appearance with food safety/durability, cost and, of course, the environmental impact. Both of them were considering the well-trodden route for pre-packed cheese packaging – vacuum packed in pretty plastic wrapping – because it seems lower waste than the current option (clear plastic wrap then paper/cardboard to make them more presentable).

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What’s more important: less packaging or reusable packaging?

How can I reuse or recycle diaphragms?

March 12, 2010 by  
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Cor, it’s been a busy week here on Recycle This – giveaways for washable pads, a Mooncup, Jam Sponges and Fairtrade condoms! It’s nearly time to bring our women’s & sexual health week to a close though but I had one more “how can I recycle this?” query before we finish: how can I reuse or recycle diaphragms? Latex rubber diaphragms degrade over time so should be replaced every couple of years.

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How can I reuse or recycle diaphragms?

for ladies by ladies.

February 12, 2010 by  
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Valentine’s Day is traditionally a day for couples, but it seems to be marketed more toward women.  In fact, 85% of Valentine’s Day cards are purchased by women.  If you’re celebrating the holiday this year, consider buying the woman in your life a gift that benefits other women, while keeping the environmental impact to a minimum.  Rather than a sparkly bauble, consider buying your lady a bracelet or a pair of earrings from Hands Up Not Handouts (HUNHO), which implements programs that give impoverished women opportunities to utilize their native skills and materials to make a difference in their lives long term.  HUNHO is designed to empower women artisans to become business leaders within their communities by supporting the production and retail of unique handcrafts.  All proceeds go back to the women, their families and communities, in order for them to be self-sustainable.  The first two cooperatives launched by HUNHO (sold on their website) are collections from Rwanda (earrings) and Palestine (bracelets).  Another way to support women through your Valentine’s Day gifting is to purchase jewelry from female artists with an eye on sustainability.  We love Jen McGlashan’s Eat With Your Hands series, made entirely out unwanted silverware.  Jen also creates Living Jewelry which makes plants (and most recently, micro-ecosystems) portable, wearable, and sustainable in reused or upcycled materials.  How cool is that?

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for ladies by ladies.

Living Beetle Brooch: Cool Bling or a Cruel Thing?

January 22, 2010 by  
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This jewel-encrusted beetle makes even Ringo Starr seem drab. Photo via The Guardian Looking for a fashion statement that will tell the world that you have zero respect for animals? Try wearing a living beetle, encrusted with jewels, pinned to your shirt

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Living Beetle Brooch: Cool Bling or a Cruel Thing?

Thieves Offers 20% Off Eco-Boutique Clothing

December 16, 2009 by  
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Image via Thieves . Today’s TreeHugger Deal$ comes to you from Thieves , a socially responsible contemporary designer line.

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Thieves Offers 20% Off Eco-Boutique Clothing

Problem Solved. Let’s Move to Another Water Filled Planet

December 16, 2009 by  
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Image: Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics GJ 1214b. Not as evocative as ‘Earth,’ but that’s the name of the planet recently discovered by astronomers, which appears to be three quarters water and ice, with one quarter rock. The Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics say, “There are also tantalising hints that the planet has a gaseous atmosphere.” Which is all well and good, except that the planet’s temperature is estimated at between 280°C and 120°C (536°F and 248°F) (Out of the global warming frying pan into the fire.) Not to mention that it is some 42 light years away

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Problem Solved. Let’s Move to Another Water Filled Planet

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