Researchers charge phone from across the room using freakin’ laser beams

February 21, 2018 by  
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Let’s face it, the way we charge our phones hasn’t evolved much over the years. You plug your phone in, or place it on a precise place on a wireless charging pad , and then you wait. But the genius researchers over at the University of Washington have developed a way to charge your phone from across the room using freakin’ laser beams! Researchers developed a cell that can power a smartphone using energy from laser beams – and it charges just as quickly as a direct connection with a USB cable. A focused near-infrared beam, which can extend up to 40 feet, delivers power, while several “retroreflectors” around the power cell reflect the guard beams back to the charging unit. Related: China wants to destroy space junk with giant lasers You might be thinking that this sounds as dangerous as sharks with laser beams on their heads, but the researchers designed a bunch of safety features, like a heatsink to help dissipate the heat and an automatic shut-off if a human moves into the beam’s path. To accomplish this, the aforementioned retroflectors act as a trip wire, terminating the charging beam if something enters the path. “The guard beams are able to act faster than our quickest motions because those beams are reflected back to the emitter at the speed of light,” said Shyam Gollakota, one of the co-authors of the study. Gollakota and co-author Arka Majumdar published their research recently in Proceedings of the Association for Computing Machinery on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable & Ubiquitous Technologies . Sometime it could totally change the way we charge our devices – no sharks needed. Via Phys.org Images via Mark Stone for UW

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Researchers charge phone from across the room using freakin’ laser beams

These wirelessly-powered AA batteries pull energy from thin air

January 12, 2018 by  
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Did you know that more than 3 billion batteries are thrown away every year in the United States ? The Cota Forever Battery is the world’s first wirelessly-powered AA battery – and it offers a more sustainable, convenient alternative to traditional disposable batteries. Designed by Ossia the battery enables any device that requires AA batteries to be recharged from a distance through the air. Ossia’s Cota products are based on a wireless technology that broadcasts a precise, powerful RF signal to any device which contains a Cota RF antenna. The RF receivers then convert that signal into effective power. The Forever Battery takes this a step further, inserting the RF receivers into a AA battery – a familiar household item that could ease the transition towards wirelessly-powered devices. Related: New ‘thermal battery’ soaks up heat energy like a sponge As exciting as the technology sounds, it will likely be years before homes are outfitted with smart AA batteries. The first adopters of Cota’s technology are likely to be large commercial operations, like factories and stores. Even before wide release, Ossia’s Cota products are already making news. Cota was awarded a 2016 CES Innovation Award in the “Tech for a Better World” product category, and Cota Tile, a wireless transmitter designed to mimic a ceiling tile, was the winner of the 2017 CES Best of Innovation Award. Via Gizmodo and PR Newswire Images via Ossia

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These wirelessly-powered AA batteries pull energy from thin air

BMW’s new wireless pad recharges EV batteries like a Sonicare toothbrush

September 28, 2017 by  
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Several automakers have teased the idea of a wireless charging pad that would make it easier to charge electric cars without a pesky cable, but BMW is ahead of the game. The automaker has announced it is ready to offer a wireless charging pad for the 530e iPerformance plug-in hybrid that recharges the battery just like a Sonicare toothbrush. With the new charging pad, 530e owners simply park over the pad , which is connected to a 220-volt outlet, and it will recharge – without having to connect any wires. Special sensors on the car help guide drivers over the charging pad; once parked, the 530e can be completely recharged in around 3.5 hours. Related: BMW unveils dynamic new rival to the Tesla Model S The technology is ready for public consumption, but it’s not known when it will be available in the U.S. since it hasn’t been approved. Outside the U.S., buyers will be able to purchase the wireless charging technology early next year, but it will only be available for the 530e iPerformance vehicle. A wireless charging system for models like the i3 and i8 will reportedly be made available at a later date. We also don’t know how much the wireless charging system will cost, but by the time it does arrive in the U.S. hopefully it will be compatible with the rest of BMW’s lineup. + BMW Images @BMW

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BMW’s new wireless pad recharges EV batteries like a Sonicare toothbrush

Here’s some climate hope: global CO2 emissions stayed static last year

September 28, 2017 by  
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The fall of coal and rise of renewable energy could be reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions . The Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (NEAA) published data this week showing global CO2 emissions remained stationary in 2016. Economist Nicholas Stern said, “These results are a welcome indication that we are nearing the peak in global annual emissions of greenhouse gases .” Every one of the largest emitting nations, minus India, saw their carbon emissions stay the same or fall. While that’s great news, the same can’t be said of all countries: Indonesia, for example, saw carbon emissions rise, as did Malaysia, Turkey, the Philippines, and Ukraine. NEAA attributed the slowdown in increasing CO2 emissions to switching away from coal to natural gas and renewable energy. Related: The world’s CO2 emissions have not increased in the past three years While NEAA said global CO2 emission levels “were more or less stable in 2015 and 2016,” total global greenhouse gas emissions did increase by around 0.5 percent. NEAA said that rise was largely due to an increase in non-CO2 emission levels, from compounds like nitrous oxide, methane , and fluorinated gases. NEAA report chief researcher Jos Olivier said, “There is no guarantee that CO2 emissions will from now on be flat or descending.” There’s still a victory for some major emitters. China saw CO2 emissions fall by 0.3 percent last year. The United States’ CO2 emissions fell by two percent, Russia’s by 2.1 percent, and the United Kingdom’s by 6.4 percent. The European Union’s emissions stayed flat. We need to keep taking climate action ; Stern said in order to meet the goals of the 2015 Paris Agreement , nations must accelerate their emissions reductions. But he still seemed hopeful, saying, “These results from the Dutch government show that there is a real opportunity to get on track.” Via Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency and The Guardian Images via Petter Rudwall on Unsplash and Antonio Garcia on Unsplash

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Here’s some climate hope: global CO2 emissions stayed static last year

Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

January 4, 2017 by  
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Forget the charging port—the roads of the near future could power your electric car while you drive, eliminating the need to ever stop to recharge or refuel again. Israeli startup Electroad is working to pave the way towards a greener world with technology that retrofits existing roads with buried coils to inductively charge electric vehicles. The team has already performed successful tests of the technology, and will be demoing the electric roads on a larger scale with a public bus route in Tel Aviv . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkpcavw_vFI Founded with the goal of reducing global emissions, Electroad promises a more cost-effective, efficient, and cleaner way to travel. The startup uses technology that relies on electromagnetic induction —the basic principle behind wirelessly powering smartphones and rechargeable toothbrushes—to power electric cars with renewable energy while driving. Although other companies like Qualcomm and KAIST also work with wireless vehicle charging, Electroad’s CEO Oren Ezer says that while the concept is the same, the technology is different. “Our technology is flexible,” said Ezer. “Only copper and rubber is needed, and deployment is quick and easy. You can retrofit one kilometer of road in just half a day, from night to morning.” The installation process begins with an asphalt scraper that digs an 8-centimeter-deep trench. A second vehicle installs the wireless energy charging strips and fills the trench back up with asphalt. Smart inverters with real-time communication are installed on the sides of the road. A coil unit attached beneath the electric vehicle receives power transferred over a small 24-centimeter air gap. Radiation is minimized and locally shielded for driver and passenger safety. Related: KAIST Launches First Road-Charged OLEV Electric Buses in South Korea Electroad plans to focus on public transportation first before opening the platform up to private transit. The startup successfully tested their technology with an electric bus five months ago in Tel Aviv and opened 20 meters of retrofitted electric road outside their lab. Soon the company will test out the technology on a public electric bus with a set route in Tel Aviv. Since the bus will drive on electric roads, it won’t need to be recharged though it will have a small battery to allow the bus to drive up to five kilometers without an electric current. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQ-DzXirW08 “We remove the energy source,” said Ezer. “The electricity will come from renewable energy transferred to the road. This is a really sustainable solution. A battery for an electric bus can cost $300,000 and weigh 5 tons. If you remove the battery then the bus is much lighter and requires less energy. This technology is cost saving. If you compare it to diesel buses, it’s half the price. If you just start with public transportation it will save money and then you can open it up to taxis and trams. Payback is very fast.” Ezer has a dream to turn all of Israel’s transportation electric with inductive charging. Electroad received a research and innovation grant from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 and recently completed a program at Capital Nature , an accelerator that focuses on emerging renewable energy in Israel. The startup plans to test their technology on a public bus route in Tel Aviv next year. + Electroad + Vibe Israel Tour courtesy of Vibe Israel Images © Electroad , last image © Lucy Wang

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Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

January 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

Forget the charging port—the roads of the near future could power your electric car while you drive, eliminating the need to ever stop to recharge or refuel again. Israeli startup Electroad is working to pave the way towards a greener world with technology that retrofits existing roads with buried coils to inductively charge electric vehicles. The team has already performed successful tests of the technology, and will be demoing the electric roads on a larger scale with a public bus route in Tel Aviv . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkpcavw_vFI Founded with the goal of reducing global emissions, Electroad promises a more cost-effective, efficient, and cleaner way to travel. The startup uses technology that relies on electromagnetic induction —the basic principle behind wirelessly powering smartphones and rechargeable toothbrushes—to power electric cars with renewable energy while driving. Although other companies like Qualcomm and KAIST also work with wireless vehicle charging, Electroad’s CEO Oren Ezer says that while the concept is the same, the technology is different. “Our technology is flexible,” said Ezer. “Only copper and rubber is needed, and deployment is quick and easy. You can retrofit one kilometer of road in just half a day, from night to morning.” The installation process begins with an asphalt scraper that digs an 8-centimeter-deep trench. A second vehicle installs the wireless energy charging strips and fills the trench back up with asphalt. Smart inverters with real-time communication are installed on the sides of the road. A coil unit attached beneath the electric vehicle receives power transferred over a small 24-centimeter air gap. Radiation is minimized and locally shielded for driver and passenger safety. Related: KAIST Launches First Road-Charged OLEV Electric Buses in South Korea Electroad plans to focus on public transportation first before opening the platform up to private transit. The startup successfully tested their technology with an electric bus five months ago in Tel Aviv and opened 20 meters of retrofitted electric road outside their lab. Soon the company will test out the technology on a public electric bus with a set route in Tel Aviv. Since the bus will drive on electric roads, it won’t need to be recharged though it will have a small battery to allow the bus to drive up to five kilometers without an electric current. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQ-DzXirW08 “We remove the energy source,” said Ezer. “The electricity will come from renewable energy transferred to the road. This is a really sustainable solution. A battery for an electric bus can cost $300,000 and weigh 5 tons. If you remove the battery then the bus is much lighter and requires less energy. This technology is cost saving. If you compare it to diesel buses, it’s half the price. If you just start with public transportation it will save money and then you can open it up to taxis and trams. Payback is very fast.” Ezer has a dream to turn all of Israel’s transportation electric with inductive charging. Electroad received a research and innovation grant from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 and recently completed a program at Capital Nature , an accelerator that focuses on emerging renewable energy in Israel. The startup plans to test their technology on a public bus route in Tel Aviv next year. + Electroad + Vibe Israel Tour courtesy of Vibe Israel Images © Electroad , last image © Lucy Wang

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Google is working on wireless charging for its driverless cars

February 8, 2016 by  
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Several automakers are floating plans to add wireless induction charging capability to electric cars, but Google may be among the first to actually release the technology. A new report reveals the company is currently in the process of installing wireless charging systems at its headquarters, which will be used for its own fleet of self-driving cars . Read the rest of Google is working on wireless charging for its driverless cars

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Freevolt harvests perpetual power from thin air by converting radio signals into free energy

October 1, 2015 by  
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Imagine being able to power up your small electronics anytime, anywhere, and at no cost. Now you can with Freevolt , a technology developed by UK-based Drayson Technologies that  converts energy from radio frequency signals into a never-ending stream of useable electricity. Leaning on RF energy harvesting to power the devices in our life would make use of something that is otherwise wasted, while bringing a lot of convenience and peace of mind to our lives. Read the rest of Freevolt harvests perpetual power from thin air by converting radio signals into free energy

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Freevolt harvests perpetual power from thin air by converting radio signals into free energy

MOW is the world’s first inductive wireless charging lamp

June 5, 2015 by  
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Powerful, handy and elegant, MOW is a portable lamp with no buttons and no wires that claims to be the world’s first inductive wireless charging lamp.  The lamp is intuitive by design, just tip over to switch it on and, with a simple gesture, it is possible to change the strength of the light, the color or the effect. Created by Emilie Deltort, a French designer who has always been passionate about industrial design, she started to develop MOW when she was a student, about 2 years ago, refining  the shape and user interface to create a perfectly simple light for any space. + MOW on Kickstarter + Emilie Deltort The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: buttonless light , induction lamp , induction light , MOW induction light , MOW light , wireless charging , wireless charging lamp , wireless lamp , wireless light

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MOW is the world’s first inductive wireless charging lamp

IKEA’s new furniture line will wirelessly charge your smartphone

March 2, 2015 by  
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Are you always losing your smartphone charger ? Not to worry, with IKEA’s new furniture line misplaced smartphone chargers will be a problem of the past. The Swedish furniture maker unveiled on Sunday a new and affordable furniture collection that can wirelessly charge certain mobile devices. The lineup of bedside tables, desks, and lamps are equipped with Qi wireless charging pads to make juicing up your phone as easy as setting it down on the charging surface. Read the rest of IKEA’s new furniture line will wirelessly charge your smartphone Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ikea , QI , Qi technology , Qi wireless , smart furniture , smartphone , wireless charging , wireless charging furniture , wireless charging pads , Wireless Power Consortium

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IKEA’s new furniture line will wirelessly charge your smartphone

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