MVRDV proposes a glowing Times Square Taiwan with interactive media facades

January 11, 2019 by  
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Prolific Dutch architecture firm MVRDV has unveiled a bold proposal to transform Taipei’s Main Station into a “Times Square for Taiwan.” Designed as part of a consortium led by Nan Hai Development, the Taipei Twin Towers aim to reactivate the area with two high-rises clad in interactive media facades. The mixed-use project would offer new retail, office space, two cinemas and two hotels, in addition to the unification and redevelopment of the existing plazas. Located on the east side of the city, Taipei Main Station is currently ensnared in an aging concrete jungle and offers an arrival sequence — the transportation hub includes access to inter- and intra-city buses, metro and the airport railway — that MVRDV principal and co-founder Winy Maas has described as an “anti-climax.” To revitalize the area as a tourist and shopping destination, the architects have proposed stacking a mix of small and large blocks together into “vertical village” skyscrapers. The smaller blocks, located near the bottom, would house different retail outlets while the larger blocks above would contain the offices, cinemas and two hotels. The blocks will be strategically stacked to not only create public atriums  but to also allow for natural ventilation. Landscaped terraces will be located on the top of the retail blocks and connected via escalators and elevated walkways. Some blocks would also be covered with interactive media displays that can be programmed to show major cultural spectacles, sporting events or advertising for the retail tenants. Related: Shimmering bamboo-shaped skyscraper to rise in Taipei “The Taipei Twin Towers will turn this area into the downtown that Taipei deserves, with its vibrant mixture of activities matched only by the vibrant collection of facade treatments on the stacked neighborhood above,” Winy Maas explained. “We break down the required program into pleasant small blocks that echo the surrounding urban quarters, thus fitting the density fit into its surroundings. People can climb over the blocks to the top — a true vertical village . And the space in between allows for social gatherings and natural ventilation.” + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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MVRDV proposes a glowing Times Square Taiwan with interactive media facades

MVRDV unveils a three-dimensional city skyscraper for Shenzhen

December 31, 2018 by  
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MVRDV is shaking up skyscraper design in its competition-winning proposal for Chinese real estate developer Vanke’s new headquarters building in Shenzhen. Envisioned as a “three-dimensional city,” the striking 250-meter-tall Vanke Headquarter Tower — dubbed the Vanke 3D City by MVRDV — will consist of eight mixed-use blocks stacked together in a sculptural arrangement optimized for views. Accessible green roofs top the staggered volumes to create a lush, park-like environment integrated with water collection and recycling systems. The Vanke Headquarter Tower will comprise eight interlinked mixed-use volumes, beginning with a base of four blocks and culminating into a single crowning tower. With 167,000 square meters of floor space, the development will consist of leasable offices, retail space, a restaurant, a hotel and plenty of outdoor space. The design and placement of each block was inspired by the core values of Vanke: ‘health’, ‘energy’, ‘open’, ‘team’, ‘green’, ‘nature’, ‘future’ and ‘creative’. In addition to the pedestrian-friendly ground level, four blocks also feature indented facades — dubbed “windows to the world” — to create semi-public spaces lined with greenery for engaging the urban fabric. “Vanke 3D City can be seen as a new type of skyscraper. By stacking the required programmatic entities, initially proposed for two separate plots, on top of each other, the two individual Vanke Group Headquarter buildings are turned into a Vanke City,” said Winy Maas, principal and co-founder of MVRDV. “They turn the ordinary into the extraordinary. By opening the buildings, a series of giant collective halls are created with a view over the bay and to the world. The plazas , gardens and halls are connected by a series of stairs and elevators, linking the many blocks into a continuous urban fabric high off the ground — a true three-dimensional city.” Related: MVRDV completes massive, mountain-like vertical village for 5,000 residents in India The development’s multiple green roofs and gardens are designed for responsible stormwater management in keeping with Shenzhen’s “sponge city” program that aims to reduce the impact of the city on the environment. Construction is expected to begin in the summer of 2019. + MVRDV Images by ATCHAIN via MVRDV

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MVRDV unveils a three-dimensional city skyscraper for Shenzhen

Climate-responsive H House celebrates the heritage of Kosovo

December 31, 2018 by  
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Recycled materials, energy-saving systems and references to Kosovan culture have been woven throughout the H House, a handsome and contemporary residence in ?aglavica, a village near the Kosovo capital of Pristina. Designed by  4M Group , the home serves as a beacon of optimism and energy-efficiency for the self-declared independent state, which has been defined by a long and troubled history. Sustainability is paramount to the dwelling and is expressed through the adoption of passive deign principles, locally sourced and recycled materials  and sensor-activated fixtures. As a partially recognized state and disputed territory in Southeastern Europe, Kosovo is home to a rich culture and a long history of war. “Demonstrating awareness of the dichotomy of Kosovo’s recent history, the client wanted a house where safety and security was paramount, but with open, light-filled interiors,” said the architects, adding that they wanted to “reflect the cultural legacy and illustrate a renewed optimism in Pristina with the creation of the H House.” As a result, the outer appearance of the home takes inspiration from the Fustanella, the traditional Albanian dress worn by men, and mimics the folds of the white garment in its multifaceted facade. The angular exterior also has a practical purpose as well. The architects followed passive solar principles in the design of the airtight building to mitigate the region’s extreme temperature fluctuations and also installed heavily insulated reinforced concrete walls as well as deeply recessed triple-glazed windows. The construction materials and labor were sourced locally and recycled materials were used wherever possible. Consequently, the H House only takes a little energy to maintain a comfortable indoor environment year-round. Related: MVRDV will transform the Tirana Pyramid, a former communist monument, into an education center In addition to low-tech strategies, the architects installed smart systems for comfort control including automatically operating louvers and window fan lights. Heating is supplied via a dual air/water thermal heat pump that also powers the underfloor heating . A wood pellet boiler provides supplemental heating. Low-energy lighting and water-efficient fixtures have also been installed. + 4M Group Via ArchDaily Photography by Ilir Rizaj and Fitim Muçaj via 4M Group

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Climate-responsive H House celebrates the heritage of Kosovo

Giant gold spot draped over this building will catch the eye of anyone flying into Seoul

July 20, 2016 by  
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Created in partnership with Gansam Architects , Paradise City will comprise two buildings: the 3,600-square-meter Sandbox retail complex and the 6,200-square-meter Nightclub. The project will serve as the centerpiece of a new tourist hub for the Korean capital. Rather than insert two conventionally styled buildings, the architects designed two concrete monolithic forms that are distorted and manipulated to respond to the surrounding environment and take on a more fluid, rippled form. Related: South Korea Unveils Plans for Sustainable Mini-City in World’s Best Airport “The project takes two simple volumes, which create a new urban space. These masses then take an imprint of the facades around the site, stretching over the two buildings. Thus adapting themselves to the given environment, accepting these conditions as a sine qua non,” says MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas . “The buildings are opened by lifting them like a curtain, unravelling their interior. Then, to top it off is the golden spot, marking the entrance like a sunbeam, making its presence known even from the air and the landing planes at Incheon airport.” The project is expected to be completed in time for the 2018 winter Olympic games and will have a direct mono-rail connection to Incheon airport. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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Giant gold spot draped over this building will catch the eye of anyone flying into Seoul

A giant eye looks out from MVRDVs futuristic library in Tianjin

June 24, 2016 by  
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Created as part of the new Binhai Cultural Center, the 34,200-square-meter Tianjin Library was created in collaboration with Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute (TUPDI) to serve as an education center and connector from the park to the burgeoning cultural district. The building is glazed to promote transparency and is punctured by an oval opening that provides clear views both into the library atrium and of the surrounding park landscape. The mirrored and spherical auditorium set at the center of the oval gives the space an eye-like and surreal effect. Related: MVRDV’s massive staircase made of scaffolding opens in Rotterdam “The Eye is the centre of the library. It ‘hollows out’ the building and creates, out of bookshelves, an environment to sit, to read, to hang out, to climb and to access, to create an organic social space,” said MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas. “In its heart is the auditorium which mirrors the environment, giving a 360 degree panorama of the space inside; a truly reflective and pensive environment.” Curvaceous and terraced bookshelves located around the auditorium echo the spherical shape and lead up into an organic ceiling pattern. The contour-like lines are extended to the facade, where they’re used as sun-shading louvres . The Tianjin Binhai library is estimated to open to the public by mid 2017. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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A giant eye looks out from MVRDVs futuristic library in Tianjin

MVRDV transforms a Hong Kong factory into a glass office with ultimate transparency

June 6, 2016 by  
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Commissioned by project developer GAW Capital , the office transformation also includes retail and restaurants on the lower levels. The original factory was enclosed in concrete and comprised dark and labyrinth-like passageways. The architects gutted the structure to remove all unnecessary trimmings until only the building skeleton was left. They preserved the “purity” of the stripped-down building by adding only white paint, glass, and stainless steel infill. The dedication to transparency was extended to the furnishings, which are also all made from glass to create an entirely glass office. Even the elevators are made of glass sheathed in glass shafts. Related: Glass bricks “stronger than concrete” clad Amsterdam’s Crystal Houses “We are moving into a transparent society, businesses are becoming more open with the public, and people care more about what goes on behind closed doors. In that way, a clear workspace leaves nothing questionable, nothing hidden; it generates trust,” said MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas. “But also it is an opportunity for the building to become a reminder of the industrial history of the neighbourhood, monumentalised in a casing of glass.” Despite the generous amounts of glazing, the building has a 17% lower annual energy consumption rate and a 15% lower peak electricity demand as compared to the average Hong Kong office. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV , © Ossip van Duivenbode

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MVRDV transforms a Hong Kong factory into a glass office with ultimate transparency

Glass Farm: MVRDV’s Modern Glass Building is Printed With a Traditional Farmhouse Facade

January 17, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Glass Farm: MVRDV’s Modern Glass Building is Printed With a Traditional Farmhouse Facade Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Daylighting , eco design , farmhouse , Frank van der Salm , fritted glass , fritting , glass farm , glass farmhouse , glass house , green architecture , Green Building , green design , MVRDV , schijndel , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , the netherlands , Winy Maas

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Glass Farm: MVRDV’s Modern Glass Building is Printed With a Traditional Farmhouse Facade

Vilamarina Housing Complex Faces a Self-Irrigating Park Outside of Barcelona

January 17, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Vilamarina Housing Complex Faces a Self-Irrigating Park Outside of Barcelona Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Barcelona city planning , Batlle i Roig , eco design , green design , self irrigating complex , sustainable design , urban planning spain , Vilamarina Building

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Vilamarina Housing Complex Faces a Self-Irrigating Park Outside of Barcelona

Rising Sea Levels Threaten to Drown Some of the World’s Most-Loved Beaches

January 17, 2013 by  
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As sea levels rise , beaches are the first things to go as waters engulf the lowest-lying land. But a recent study by Andrew Cooper, Professor of Coastal Studies, indicates that beaches naturally adapt to survive rising oceans – the real problem is that human development limits the ability of beaches to expand. Read the rest of Rising Sea Levels Threaten to Drown Some of the World’s Most-Loved Beaches Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: climate change beaches , Climate Change impacts , drowning beaches , global warming ocean levels , Iconic Beaches Drowned Rising Sea Levels , Professor Andrew Cooper , School of Environmental Studies , University of Ulster Environmental Studies

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Rising Sea Levels Threaten to Drown Some of the World’s Most-Loved Beaches

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