Award-winning Australian winery adds new, sustainable building

December 25, 2019 by  
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Victoria’s Yarra Valley is an idyllic region known for its award-winning vineyards. Now, guests to the  Medhurst Winery  have a new, sustainable tasting area to enjoy the label’s delicious wine selection. The family-run winery has just added the Cellar Door — a contemporary extension that was built with resilient and  sustainable features . Designed by  Folk Architects , the new contemporary space allows visitors to view the entire wine-making process, from the vineyards and production area to the gorgeous tasting facility. The main building of the winery sits in a prestigious location, elevated on a sloped landscape overlooking the vineyards. A low-lying elongated volume, the contemporary building features one section made of heat-reflective, polycarbonate material. The translucent walls allow natural light to illuminate the wine-making area during the day, while at night revealing a picturesque view of wine-making equipment found within. Related: Modern timber winery blends Japanese and Viennese influences The winery’s rooftop features an expansive green roof with a state-of-the-art rainwater collection system. According to the winery, the roof collects around 500,000 liters of rainwater every year. This water is filtered and used in the wine-making process. Now, visitors to the winery will have a sophisticated place to taste the wonderful Medhurst wines. The new Cellar Door sits adjacent to the 250-ton wine-making facility and features a design that mimics its linear volume, while subtly curving around the ends. Located in a bushfire zone, the Cellar Door’s materials were chosen for their durable and sustainable qualities. The building’s main materials include a bold mix of oxidized steel and fire-resistant timber. Additionally, the roof eaves were carefully designed to jut out over the building’s frame to let in the maximum amount of sunlight during winter, while also reducing solar glare during summer. This passive feature allows the building to reduce its mechanical heating and cooling throughout the year. On the inside, visitors are greeted by a warm space designed for taking in the incredible views and tasting the award-winning wine. The entrance-way includes a 40-foot concrete bench that sits under a wall of thin timber slats . Raw steel accents throughout give the interior a modern industrial feel. With the addition of the Cellar Door, visitors can view the entire wine-making process. From the wine tastings offered at the Cellar Door, visitors can follow a winding path through the beautiful landscape to the production area, before making their way out to the vineyards beyond. + Folk Architects + Medhurst Winery Via ArchDaily Photography by Peter Bennetts

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Award-winning Australian winery adds new, sustainable building

Planned community embraces luxe, eco-conscious design in Bocas del Toro, Panama

December 25, 2019 by  
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More than 12 years in the making, the 457-acre planned community of Casi Cielo has just begun sales for its first phase. Located on Panama’s northern province of Bocas del Toro, the high-end resort will emphasize a sustainable, low carbon footprint with site-specific architecture informed by passive solar principles and the natural environment. Led by developer Circular Strategy Group, the Casi Cielo development was created with help from Mario Lazo & Unidad Diseño, WATG and XOC2 to create a “future-forward” masterplan on an undeveloped peninsula next to the ocean within close proximity of the 45,000-acre protected San San-Pond Oak natural reserve. The mixed-use site will include a grid of 75 turn-key sites with 118 hotel suites and 77 branded luxury residences designed by Zurcher Arquitectos, Wimberly Interiors and GOCO Hospitality. Related: This private island resort in Panama promises sustainable luxury “Being from Panama , I felt this was a golden opportunity, not only to preserve Bocas and make positive impact in the region but also introduce a new way for conscious communities to be built,” said Moshe Levi, co-developer of Casi Cielo. “With the infrastructure already in place, Casi Cielo essentially serves as a blank canvas that will continue to evolve, while remaining a true haven for those seeking a different way of life.” Indoor-outdoor living will be celebrated at Casi Cielo, which will also emphasize its connection with nature by offering outdoor-oriented wellness and eco-tourism programs that take advantage of the site’s proximity to world-class surf and a tropical jungle landscape. To optimize the energy performance of the community, the architects have taken passive solar strategies into account when placing and orienting the buildings. Solar thermal and rainwater collection systems are expected to be integrated into the design as well. Casi Cielo is slated to open in 2021. + Casi Cielo Images via Casi Cielo

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Planned community embraces luxe, eco-conscious design in Bocas del Toro, Panama

LEED-seeking winery in Uruguay is built almost entirely of locally sourced materials

February 26, 2019 by  
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Nestled in the bucolic countryside of Garzón, Uruguay, the boutique winery Bodega Garzón produces estate-grown premium wines while keeping sustainability in mind. Designed by Argentina-based architecture firm Bórmida & Yanzón , the winery optimizes energy efficiency with insulating green roofs that total nearly an acre in size, rainwater harvesting and reuse, as well as a high-efficiency HVAC with heat recovery. Fitted with state-of-the-art technology, the 205,000-square-foot development is currently pursuing LEED certification. Set on property formerly overgrown with invasive species and marked by rocky and steep slopes, the Bodega Garzón winery has reintroduced the landscape to native species and more productive uses. Not only does the state-of-the-art winery encompass 500 acres of vineyards, but it also boasts a production facility, a tasting room for visiting guests, retail space, a wine club, an open-fire 120-seat restaurant, and caves for barrel storage, tours, private dining, and events. Views of the idyllic countryside are optimized in the design and placement of the buildings. As part of the winery’s commitment to sustainability, over 90 percent of the construction materials were locally sourced and include granite, concrete and stone. An earthy and natural material palette of raw steel, honed marble, brass accents, leathers, and rich textiles give the interiors, dressed by California-based Backen Gillam & Kroeger Architects, a luxurious and polished feel. The designers were also careful to select recycled and rapidly renewable materials, such as Forest Stewardship Council-certified timbers. Related: An award-winning winery in British Columbia elegantly steps down a hillside The 19 varieties of grapes grown on site — including the brand’s flagship Tannat and Albariño grapes — are connected to drip irrigation that uses recycled surface runoff harvested in newly dug man-made pond systems. All stormwater runoff is treated before leaving the site and recycled for not only all of the irrigation, but for cleaning the outdoor areas and for the water pond as well. + Bórmida & Yanzón

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LEED-seeking winery in Uruguay is built almost entirely of locally sourced materials

An award-winning winery in British Columbia elegantly steps down a hillside

August 2, 2018 by  
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After having completed the Mission Hill Winery in the heart of British Columbia, Seattle-based architecture practice Olson Kundig Architects was tapped yet again for the design of Mission Hill’s sister winery, Martin’s Lane. Set into a steep hillside in the picturesque Canadian city of Kelowna, the newest von Mandl Family Estates winery features a design that follows the existing topography to facilitate a gravity-flow winemaking process. In addition to production facilities, the winery—which has won awards for both its wines and architecture—includes a visitor’s center and tasting room with sweeping views of the surrounding vineyards and terrain. Completed in the summer of 2016, the Martin’s Lake Winery is largely built from a striking combination of glass, obsidian-painted structural steel, weathered corrugated steel and concrete. The massive rectangular volume—spanning 34,800 square feet—is defined by a “central daylighting ‘fracture’” that splits the building down the middle, separating the production side from the visitor area. That “fracture” is fitted with clerestory windows to pull natural light deep into the interior. The production side of the winery  stair-steps down the landscape, making use of the natural slope for the gravity-flow winemaking process. The grape-receiving area is located at the top, followed by the fermentation and settling room, then the bottling room on the aboveground level and, finally, the underground barrel storage area. The cantilevered visitor’s area includes an office, wine lab, tasting room, dining room and a variety of publicly accessible areas that offer glimpses into the production process. Large windows frame views of nearby Okanagan Lake, the iconic winery bell tower, and the vineyards. Related: Elegant LEED Gold winery mimics Napa Valley’s curves “The idea of the building is to embrace both the landscape and the nature of gravity-fed wineries,” explains principal architect Tom Kundig. “Because it’s on a hillside, it was an ideal location amongst the vineyards of the area. The building falls along the topography of the land where production happens, while the hospitality portion of the program cantilevers out over the landscape, opening the space to the lake, the vineyards, and the mountains beyond.” + Olson Kundig Images by Nic Lehoux and James O’Mara

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An award-winning winery in British Columbia elegantly steps down a hillside

Mexican winery built from recycled wood and rammed earth blends into the valley landscape

December 28, 2016 by  
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Mexico’s booming wine country of Valle de Guadalupe in Baja California recently welcomed the chic BRUMA winery , a large complex constructed with a natural materials palette to blend beautifully into its surroundings. TAC Taller de Arquitectura Contextual designed the BRUMA winery as part of a 75-acre masterplan that includes a bed and breakfast, pool, spa, event space, and restaurant. Rammed earth and recycled wood feature prominently in the rustic winery building. Despite its 22,000-square-meter size, the BRUMA winery visually disappears in the dusty red and green landscape of Valle de Guadalupe. Part of the winery is tucked underground to take advantage of the earth’s thermal mass that protects against volatile temperature changes. A large reflecting pool nearby also serves as a natural heat insulator. Related: Rammed earth house blends traditional materials with modern techniques in Vietnam’s last frontier Recycled wood and steel are the primary materials used to construct the winery. The timber slats are naturally weathered and are of varying shades to give the building an interesting and earthy texture and parts of the wooden walls are punctuated by small glass openings for beautiful effect. Pieces of natural unmilled wood are used as seating or decorative objects. Native plants cover the roof of the winery. Curving rammed earth walls also make up part of the complex, further integrating the building into the landscape. + TAC Taller de Arquitectura Contextual Via ArchDaily Images © Humberto Romero

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Mexican winery built from recycled wood and rammed earth blends into the valley landscape

An old Swiss farmhouse gets a striking wooden extension that juxtaposes past and present

December 28, 2016 by  
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Studio Marazzi Reinhardt recently updated an old farmhouse in the quiet Swiss village of Löhningen  with a striking wooden extension that seamlessly melds modern and classic architecture. ‘Haus Zur Blume’ ads extra living space to an existing home while juxtaposing the past against the present. The modern structure is wrapped in a wooden slat facade that filters natural light.

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An old Swiss farmhouse gets a striking wooden extension that juxtaposes past and present

Automated battery parasols modulate temperature at Argentina’s divine Hotel Casa de Uco

January 15, 2016 by  
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The Winery That’s Never Purchased A Wine Bottle

December 16, 2015 by  
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At Bunker Hill Winery, things are just a little bit different. Well, make that a LOT different. This family-owned sustainable winery in Parrish, Florida is serving up unique wines in eco-friendly packaging and sharing their commitment to the…

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The Winery That’s Never Purchased A Wine Bottle

New Foster + Partners building helps Château Margaux produce more wine in Bordeaux

June 18, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of New Foster + Partners building helps Château Margaux produce more wine in Bordeaux Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bordeaux , Château Margaux winery , Foster + Partners , france , green architecture , green renovation , natural light , pitched roof , vernacular architecture , wine cellar , winery

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New Foster + Partners building helps Château Margaux produce more wine in Bordeaux

Spanish Winemaker Obtains Permission to Cut Down 154 Acres of California Redwoods

October 23, 2013 by  
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As California’s wine industry continues to grow, it has extended its search for suitable areas to grow grapes outside of the valleys and closer to the coast. But Spanish winemaker Artesa Vineyards and Winery is taking this quest too far with plans to destroy 154 acres of coastal redwoods and Douglas firs to make space for new grapevines. With one study indicating that areas suitable for vineyards in the world’s major wine-producing regions could shrink between 19 and 73 percent by 2050, it’s likely that the situation will get worse before it gets better. Read the rest of Spanish Winemaker Obtains Permission to Cut Down 154 Acres of California Redwoods Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 154 Acres of Redwoods , Artesa Vineyards and Winery , Calfornian Redwoods , california wine industry , Deforestation in California , Friends of the Gualala River , redwoods threatened by wineries , Sierra Club’s Redwood Chapter , Sonoma county , Spanish winery to cut down California Redwoods , The Center for Biological Diversity        

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