New double-pane quantum dot solar windows generate power with better efficiency

January 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New double-pane quantum dot solar windows generate power with better efficiency

Researchers at an American national laboratory have now employed quantum dots for double-pane solar windows that offer shading, insulation, and, of course, generate energy – with greater efficiency. The Los Alamos National Laboratory team drew on a new window architecture utilizing two layers of low-priced quantum dots, tuned to take in distinct parts of the solar spectrum. The double-pane windows were equipped with manganese-doped quantum dots, absorbing blue and ultraviolet, on the surface of the front glass pane, and copper indium selenide quantum dots, absorbing the rest of the spectrum, on the back pane’s surface. Once light is absorbed, dots re-emit it at a longer wavelength. Total internal reflection guides the light to the edges, where it can be gathered and turned into power by solar cells in the window frame. Related: National laboratory scales up quantum-dot solar windows that can power entire buildings Solar-spectrum splitting – in which higher- and lower-energy solar photons can be processed separately – is key to the research, according to Los Alamos. And the dots in the front layer are essentially reabsorption free, which the laboratory said the team accomplished by incorporating into quantum dots manganese ions “that serve as highly emissive impurities. Light absorbed by the quantum dots activates these impurities. Following activation, the manganese ions emit light at energies below the quantum-dot absorption onset. This trick allows for almost complete elimination of losses due to self-absorption by the quantum dots.” The journal Nature Photonics published the research online on New Year’s Day. Per the article’s abstract, the researchers’ prototype “exhibits a high optical quantum efficiency of 6.4 percent for sunlight illumination and solar-to-electrical power conversion efficiency of 3.1 percent. The efficiency gains due to the tandem architecture over single-layer devices quickly increases with increasing LSC [luminescent solar concentrator] size and can reach more than 100 percent in structures with window sizes of more than 2,500 centimeters squared.” Double-pane quantum dot solar window research could lower the cost of solar power , according to lead researcher Victor Klimov, who said in a statement , “Because of the strong performance we can achieve with low-cost, solution processable materials, these quantum-dot-based double-pane windows and even more complex luminescent solar concentrators offer a new way to bring down the cost of solar electricity.” Via Los Alamos National Laboratory Images via Los Alamos National Laboratory Twitter and Depositphotos

Here is the original: 
New double-pane quantum dot solar windows generate power with better efficiency

NREL’s solar-powered window breaks new ground with 11% efficiency

November 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NREL’s solar-powered window breaks new ground with 11% efficiency

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has revealed its prototype of a solar-powered “smart window,” which has broken new ground by achieving 11 percent efficiency, enough to potentially provide 80 percent of electricity needs in the United States. The NREL smart window is also able to lower building temperatures and generate electricity by changing the window’s appearance from clear to tinted. Not only does this decrease the amount of sunlight entering a building, thus lowering its heat intake, but also turns the windows into photovoltaic panels. Upon shifting to the darker, hazy view, the smart window then starts its energy production . “There is a fundamental tradeoff between a good window and a good solar cell,” said Lance Wheeler , a scientist at NREL. “This technology bypasses that. We have a good solar cell when there’s lots of sunshine and we have a good window when there’s not.” The smart window’s functionality depends upon advanced materials such as perovskite, a calcium titanium oxide mineral that is able to absorb sunlight and generate electricity, and single-walled carbon nanotubes, microscopic structures with incredible strength. While existing solar windows are typically not responsive to changes in sunlight, thus remaining at one set level of transparency, NREL’s prototype breaks new ground by demonstrating a dynamic ability to react to light conditions. Related: New silicon nanoparticles could finally make solar windows commercially viable The window’s ability to transform is made possible by molecules of methylamine, which move in and out of the window depending on the circumstances. When the sun heats up the window, the molecules are absorbed into it, darkening the window. When the sun is not shining directly on the window, the molecules are expelled, which makes the window transparent. In its solar panel form, the smart window has been able to achieve 11 percent efficiency in capturing solar energy and translating it into electricity. The research team at NREL believes that their smart window design could be used to charge mobile devices and on-board electronics such as fans, rain sensors and motors. While research is ongoing, the team is already focusing on how their design could be commercialized and made available to the public. Via Electrek and NREL Images via Dennis Schroeder/NREL and NREL

Read the original post:
NREL’s solar-powered window breaks new ground with 11% efficiency

19th-century church converted into gorgeous modern lofts in Brooklyn

November 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 19th-century church converted into gorgeous modern lofts in Brooklyn

This 19th-century church in Brooklyn was converted into a modern residential building that lets the original details of the historic structure shine through. The Bushwick church was gutted and turned into a series of daylit lofts available for rent through Nooklyn . Living units are spread over three stories, and they feature beautiful oak floors, antique arched windows, and gold mosaic ceilings. The Victorian Gothic church from the 1890s is located at 618 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn. Known as The Saint Marks, the conversion project offers 99 apartments with up to two bedrooms. The units come in different loft -inspired layouts, with large windows and high ceilings , hardwood floors and recessed lighting. Related: A massive London church is transformed into an extraordinary luxury home The developer removed the original spire due to structural instability and zoning rules. They introduced bike storage and onsite parking, central air conditioning in all units. The kitchens feature pale veneer cabinetry and stainless steel appliances. Some of the units, like the one shown in the images, have private decks as well. + Nooklyn Via Uncrate

See the rest here:
19th-century church converted into gorgeous modern lofts in Brooklyn

‘Geomagnetic spike’ 3,000 years ago could offer insight into Earth’s hidden interior

November 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ‘Geomagnetic spike’ 3,000 years ago could offer insight into Earth’s hidden interior

Earth’s magnetic field shields us from damaging radiation from the sun, but its strength and ability to protect us, is variable. Scientists uncovered details about a geomagnetic spike that happened around 1,000 BC that could alter our understanding of the magnetic field and the planet’s interior – and are exploring how a similar event might impact us if it occurred today. Scientists identified 1,000 BC’s geomagnetic spike after investigating copper from slag heaps in Jordan and Israel. They began to explore what Earth’s magnetic field might have been like way back then, and found something surprising: the copper recorded Earth’s magnetic field strength rising and then falling by more than 100 percent in 30 years. Related: Molten jet stream found hurtling through Earth’s core That research was published in 2010 , but University of Leeds lecturer Christopher Davies, in a piece for The Conversation , highlighted other discoveries since pointing to high field strengths around the same time in Turkey, China, and Georgia. Meanwhile, field strengths in Egypt, India, and Cyprus were normal – so the spike may have been only around 2,000 kilometers, or around 1,243 miles, wide. Davies wrote, “Such a rapid change over such a small area marks out the geomagnetic spike as one of the most extreme variations of Earth’s magnetic field ever recorded.” Researchers aren’t quite sure what caused the spike, but the flow of iron in the core could have played a role. That said, explaining the changes that came with the geomagnetic spike requires flows five to 10 times greater than what we observe today. “The prospect that the iron core could flow faster and change more suddenly than previously thought, together with the possibility that even more extreme spike-like events occurred in the past, is challenging some conventional views on the dynamics of Earth’s core,” Davies said. Spikes must be accompanied by weak spots, which is where geomagnetic storms tend to be prevalent. So if a spike happened today, part of the planet could see power outages or satellite disruption because of a geomagnetic storm. But Davies said it’s hard to say if another spike will happen – until recently, the Jordan spike was the only such event scientists had observed. There’s now some evidence a spike also occurred in Texas around 1,000 BC. Via The Conversation Images via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr and U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Joshua Garcia

View original here:
‘Geomagnetic spike’ 3,000 years ago could offer insight into Earth’s hidden interior

MIT’s breakthrough self-shading windows change from clear to dark in an instant

August 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MIT’s breakthrough self-shading windows change from clear to dark in an instant

Three MIT chemists just gave us a glimpse into the future of smart windows . Their groundbreaking “self-shading” window can quickly change from clear to dark – and then stay that way without using any electricity . The windows could help everyone from homeowners looking to save on heating and cooling costs to pilots trying to get a clearer view out the cockpit window. The MIT researchers’ work was published this week in the journal Chem . In the paper, the chemists detail their innovative use of electrochromic materials to bypass issues involved with creating self-shading windows. For example, transition lenses in eyeglasses are able to change from clear to dark, but the process is relatively slow. Related: MIT researchers discover silk holds the key to vastly improved filtration This isn’t the first time electrochromic materials have been used – they can be found in Boeing 787 windows that darken over time with the flip of a switch. But those Boeing windows still take a few minutes to change. The positive ions that help with the color change move slowly, delaying the darkening process. To solve that issue, the MIT chemists used materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which conduct ions and electrons quickly. Again, the use of MOFs isn’t new, but the MIT team is the ” first to harness them for their electrical and optical properties ” so their windows darken quickly. Further, it’s easier to create windows that can tint blue or green, but the MIT’s windows are nearly black. Once the windows turn dark with the help of a little electricity, they stay dark without using any power until a switch is flipped to clear them up again. Paper co-author Mircea Dinc? said , “It’s the combination of these two, of a relatively fast switching time and a nearly black color, that has really got people excited…These could lead to pretty significant energy savings.” Via MIT News Images via Wikimedia Commons and Khalid Abdulaziz Kaabi and Dennis Sheberla/MIT

Original post:
MIT’s breakthrough self-shading windows change from clear to dark in an instant

This window transforms into a balcony right before your eyes

March 3, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This window transforms into a balcony right before your eyes

Read the rest of This window transforms into a balcony right before your eyes

More here: 
This window transforms into a balcony right before your eyes

GREEN BUILDING 101: Indoor Environmental Quality—Clean Air and Comfort for Homes and Office Spaces

May 22, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on GREEN BUILDING 101: Indoor Environmental Quality—Clean Air and Comfort for Homes and Office Spaces

Feeling good in our homes or offices isn’t just a matter of having a beautiful space: No matter how fabulous your furnishings, a poorly designed indoor environment can literally make you sick . Building green means considering not only the environmental impact of materials and construction, but also the physical and psychological health of the occupants. The next phase of our series covers Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ)—one of the criteria of the  USGBC ‘s  LEED  rating system—and how you can achieve it in your own space. Read the rest of GREEN BUILDING 101: Indoor Environmental Quality—Clean Air and Comfort for Homes and Office Spaces Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “leed” , air , Air quality , bright office , clean air , Environmental quality , Green Building 101 , Green Walls , healthy building , healthy home , healthy office , Indoor , indoor air quality , indoor environment , indoor environmental quality , indoors , LEED-H , pure air , sick building , sick building syndrome , skylight , voc , volatile organic compounds , window

Go here to read the rest: 
GREEN BUILDING 101: Indoor Environmental Quality—Clean Air and Comfort for Homes and Office Spaces

3,200 People Prepare to Evacuate as Arizona ‘Slide Fire’ Burns Out of Control

May 22, 2014 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 3,200 People Prepare to Evacuate as Arizona ‘Slide Fire’ Burns Out of Control

A wildfire burning out of control between the towns of Sedona and Flagstaff in northern Arizona was most likely “human caused,” say authorities. The blaze has been dubbed the “Slide Fire” due to its proximity to Slide Rock State Park, which was recently named one of America’s 10 Best State Parks . The fire began on Tuesday but “exploded” yesterday, threatening hundreds of homes and businesses and putting over 3,000 residents on evacuation alert. 300 homes are under mandatory evacuation. Read the rest of 3,200 People Prepare to Evacuate as Arizona ‘Slide Fire’ Burns Out of Control Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arizona Slide Fire , Arizona wildfire , Flagstaff , forest fire , Hotshot firefighters , Oak Creek Canyon , Sedona , Slide Fire , Slide Rock State Park , wildfire , Yarnell Fire

Excerpt from: 
3,200 People Prepare to Evacuate as Arizona ‘Slide Fire’ Burns Out of Control

Tiny Window House Offers Unobstructed Views of Japan’s Sagamo Bay

February 3, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tiny Window House Offers Unobstructed Views of Japan’s Sagamo Bay

Read the rest of Tiny Window House Offers Unobstructed Views of Japan’s Sagamo Bay Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , homes with small footprint , Japanese design , Kanagawa Japan , sustainable design , tiny home in Japan , tiny homes , tiny japanese homes , tiny living , Window House , yasutaka yoshimura        

Excerpt from: 
Tiny Window House Offers Unobstructed Views of Japan’s Sagamo Bay

Another Apartment’s Long Window House Takes a Unique Approach to Privacy in Overcrowded Tokyo

January 6, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Another Apartment’s Long Window House Takes a Unique Approach to Privacy in Overcrowded Tokyo

Read the rest of Another Apartment’s Long Window House Takes a Unique Approach to Privacy in Overcrowded Tokyo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Another Apartment , full-height sliding window , hidden sink , Long Window House , micro house in Tokyo , multi-purpose residential room , privacy house in Tokyo , sliding partition room , Tsuyoshi Kobayashi        

Go here to read the rest: 
Another Apartment’s Long Window House Takes a Unique Approach to Privacy in Overcrowded Tokyo

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1281 access attempts in the last 7 days.