Dead rabbits found at Iowa wind farm likely used to lure and kill eagles

November 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Dead rabbits found at Iowa wind farm likely used to lure and kill eagles

In a story that may have come  two days late , a local landowner-farmer in Delaware County, Iowa was shocked to discover over a dozen deceased rabbits, each with their necks broken, scattered beneath wind turbines on their land. The land is leased by RPM Access, a company that owns several wind farms throughout the state. “I don’t understand who would do something like this? I really don’t,” said Linda Slobodnik, an environmental consultant for RPM Access, according to KWWL News . Slobodnik, who has stated that this act of violence is the most disturbing incident she has seen in her 10 years in the wind industry, believes the rabbits were used to lure in eagles or other birds to the turbines, likely to kill them as well. Why would someone seek to lure and kill eagles, using dead rabbits as bait? “There are a lot of anti-wind people. At this time, we are looking at new places for projects, and I am thinking that possibly someone would like us to not build another wind farm in the area,” said Slobodnik. “I think there is a lot of people who will speak against the wind turbines. I think a lot of what they do is out of ignorance,” said RPM Access Project Manager, Kevin Lehs, according to KWWL News . Despite some local resistance, Iowa has made enormous progress towards a clean energy economy, primarily through wind power , which provided more than 36 percent of all electricity used in 2016. As it stands, Iowa is the most wind-powered state in the United States . Related: The world’s first floating wind farm just switched online Although the dead rabbits were deliberately placed, it is true that wind turbines can kill local wildlife. It is estimated that 300,000 birds are killed by wind turbines each year. That may sound like a lot, but it’s important to see these numbers in context. Wind power kills 1/15th the number of birds that fossil-fuel generated power does each year. Glass buildings in cities are also frequent bird killers. And, of course, outdoor and feral cats kill hundreds of millions of birds annually. Via Elektrek and KWWL News Images via Depositphotos (1)

Here is the original:
Dead rabbits found at Iowa wind farm likely used to lure and kill eagles

Tesla and Vestas team up to combine batteries and wind turbines

September 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tesla and Vestas team up to combine batteries and wind turbines

Two of the world’s leading renewable energy giants are teaming up to work towards a sustainable energy future. Vestas , the world’s largest wind turbine manufacturer, is working on a global program to combine wind power with batteries , and they’ve turned to none other than Tesla for help. Vestas aims to add energy storage to wind farms for days when the wind doesn’t blow, so they started a global program centering around about 10 projects. Tesla isn’t the only company to receive a call from the wind turbine manufacturer, which will work with other battery makers to determine how to best store wind power. Related: World’s most powerful wind turbine breaks 24-hour record for energy generation Vestas announced at their general meeting in April that they wanted to focus on energy storage, and Denmark’s Borsen publication reported the collaboration with Tesla. Chairman Bert Nordberg said the company wants a new competitive edge after surging past General Electric Company to claim the largest market share of wind energy in America. Meanwhile, Tesla has been looking for new ways to utilize their batteries beyond electric cars and Powerwalls . Their battery units have been popping up in grid-scale installations such as this one in Southern California , and Elon Musk signed a deal in July with the government in South Australia to build a massive energy storage facility to help combat their power woes. Vestas has been tinkering with the idea of integrating battery storage with wind turbines since 2012, when they launched a test project in Lem-Kaer, Denmark. They said they plan to commission other such projects around the world. In a Friday statement, the company said, “Across a number of projects, Vestas is working with different energy storage technologies with specialized companies, including Tesla, to explore and test how wind turbines and energy storage can work together in sustainable energy solutions that can lower the cost of energy.” Via Bloomberg Images courtesy of Vestas Wind Systems A/S and via Ernesto Sanchez/Edison International

More: 
Tesla and Vestas team up to combine batteries and wind turbines

Minimalist Timber Loft House gives you a birds-eye view of the Swedish landscape

September 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Minimalist Timber Loft House gives you a birds-eye view of the Swedish landscape

This minimalist timber Loft House (Lofthuset) is a serene getaway that offers a birds-eye view of northern Sweden’s mountainous landscapes. Architect Hanna Michelson, who works for Tham & Videga?rd Arkitekter , designed the building as a unique sanctuary and peaceful vantage point for visitors who want to escape into the treetops without damaging the forest landscape. The house is lifted from the ground by a timber framework in an attempt not to disturb the surrounding nature. The lower part of the house offers a more immediate connection to the forest, while the upper part, a roofed outdoor space stripped from walls, provides uninterrupted views of the valley below. Related: Dreamy summer retreat built of salvaged materials sends eclectic vibes in Austin The minimalist interior is stripped down to the essentials, with sleeping accommodations arranged on futon mattresses that can be hung on the wall in order to free the room for daily activities. A wooden bench by the window is a place for reflection, but can also be used as seating during mealtimes. Related: Swedish Örnsro Timber Town relies on wood to lower its carbon footprint Birch plywood and ash dominate the interior and complement the timber framework of the house. Flax fibers, traditionally used in Nordic building practices, provides insulation to the exterior walls made from heart pine and organically treated spruce wood. + Tham & Videga?rd Arkitekter Via Architizer

View original post here: 
Minimalist Timber Loft House gives you a birds-eye view of the Swedish landscape

Wind power now runs all electric passenger trains in the Netherlands

January 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wind power now runs all electric passenger trains in the Netherlands

All of the electric passenger trains running in the Netherlands are now powered entirely by wind . One year ahead of schedule, Dutch railway company NS announced its entire electric train fleet is running on 100-percent wind power as of January 1, 2017, ushering in a new era of green transportation . Renewable energy advocates hope the early success will inspire planners to incorporate wind-powered trains in other high-speed rail projects around the world, including some proposed in the United States. In late 2015, the Dutch government announced its goal to power the country’s electric trains entirely with wind power by 2018. However, early successes in rolling out the clean energy program resulted in 75 percent wind power for the trains in 2016, so the initiative made a final push and achieved 100 percent effect January 1, 2017. One of the Netherlands ’ largest railway companies, known as NS , partnered with the Eneco energy company in 2015 to funnel renewable energy into its fleet of electric trains, which carry 600,000 people per day. Related: All Netherlands Railways trains will be 100% wind powered by 2018 Electric trains on the NS use around 1.2 billion kWh of electricity a year, which is roughly the equivalent of all the households in the city of Amsterdam. Switching to a renewable source for the energy-hogging transportation will make a huge dent in the nation’s carbon footprint, which has already been shrinking over the years due to investments in renewable energy projects. The electricity used to power the Dutch trains comes from wind farms in the Netherlands, Belgium, and Finland, many of which were just recently built. Because some of those farms opened ahead of schedule, it became possible to move up the timeline for powering electric trains with clean energy. Via Clean Technica Images via Wikipedia ( 1 , 2 )

See more here: 
Wind power now runs all electric passenger trains in the Netherlands

Costa Rica ran almost entirely on renewables in 2016

January 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Costa Rica ran almost entirely on renewables in 2016

It’s a happy new year in Costa Rica, where the nation’s Electricity Institute has reported that 98.1 percent of the electricity used in 2016 came from renewable energy sources . This is the second consecutive year that Costa Rica has proven the power and reliability of renewables, after hitting 99 percent in 2015. While the achievement isn’t surprising, given that the country’s leaders have been ambitiously pursuing (and coming close to) this goal for several years, it is still important. What Costa Rica has accomplished shows the world that relying on renewable energy is not only possible, but that it can become a reality much earlier than many skeptics believe. The reasons behind Costa Rica ’s high renewable usage are numerous, and sort of complicated. For starters, the per capita electricity consumption in the nation of 4.9 million people is much less than, say, that of the typical American. In fact, the average Costa Rican uses just one-seventh the electricity that Americans do. With less electricity in demand, it’s much easier to supply those needs with renewable sources, but that’s not to say it wouldn’t be possible for the United States to reach the same astounding figures with the proper infrastructure. Related: Costa Rica celebrates 113 days of 100-percent renewable energy (and counting) Costa Rica’s climate has also made it a bit easier to become powered almost entirely by renewables . The area’s plentiful rainfall positions hydropower as the primary renewable energy source, supplying around 75 percent of the electricity used each year. Solar and wind power make up most of the remaining portion, again due to the perks of the geographic region. While 99 and 98 percent in 2015 and 2016 are insanely respectable figures, the Costa Rican government is aiming higher for 2017 and beyond, with four new wind farms to generate even more clean energy. Via Grist Images via Wikipedia ( 1 , 2 )

Original post:
Costa Rica ran almost entirely on renewables in 2016

Discreet new home in North Carolina acts like a gateway to the surrounding wilderness

January 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Discreet new home in North Carolina acts like a gateway to the surrounding wilderness

The cypress-clad Carolina Hillside House perches over a thick forest near North Wilkesboro’s Kerr Scott Lake, providing stunning views of untouched nature. ARCHITECTUREFIRM designed the building as a habitable gateway that connects an abandoned logging road, the only access to the house, with the surrounding wilderness. The house is located above North Wilkesboro’s Kerr Scott Lake and is accessed by an abandoned logging road. Clad in untreated cypress that acquires a beautiful patina over time, the house blends into its wooded surroundings. Related: Snøhetta’s New Library at North Carolina State University Aims for LEED Silver A large opening separates the main living area and sleeping quarters, forming a sheltered patio with a beautiful outdoor fireplace . This space provides sensational views of the surrounding forest and allows the owners to enjoy the outdoors even during harsh winters. + ARCHITECTUREFIRM Via Uncrate Photos by James Ewing

More: 
Discreet new home in North Carolina acts like a gateway to the surrounding wilderness

Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

July 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

Bacteria are often associated with disease – but in the future they could serve as a potent power source. University of Oxford researchers recently used bacteria to spin rotors in tiny ‘ wind farms ‘ – and they think these microscopic engines could power small electronic components like smartphone microphones. If you’ve ever looked at bacteria under a microscope, you’ve probably seen a lot of random movement. Under ordinary circumstances, there’s not yet a way to get power from that spontaneous motion. Oxford researchers immersed a ” lattice of 64 symmetric microrotors ” into fluid filled with bacteria, and found the bacteria organized their movement in such a way that the microrotors spun in opposite directions – kind of like a wind farm. This organized movement creates a steady stream of power. Related: Can bacteria help curb the spread of the Zika virus? The paper’s co-author Tyler Shendruk said in an Oxford press release , “When we did the simulation with a single rotor in the bacterial turbulence, it just got kicked around randomly. But when we put an array of rotors in the living fluid, they suddenly formed a regular pattern, with neighboring rotors spinning in opposite directions.” We probably won’t be powering homes with bacteria any time soon – but this teeny power source could be beneficial for micromachines . The team said these little wind farms could also drive ” devices that are self-assembled and self-powered .” Another paper co-author, Julia Yeomans, said ” Nature is brilliant at creating tiny engines, and there is enormous potential if we can understand how to exploit similar designs.” + Science Advances Via Gizmag Images via Sumesh P. Thampi1, Amin Doostmohammadi, Tyler N. Shendruk, Ramin Golestanian, and Julia M. Yeomans

Excerpt from:
Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

Cleveland offshore wind farm project awarded $40 million DOE grant

June 28, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Cleveland offshore wind farm project awarded $40 million DOE grant

Could the Rust Belt turn into the Wind Belt? The Great Lakes represent 20 percent of the United States’ total offshore wind energy capacity, but not a single wind turbine has yet to be seen. That could start to change soon thanks to a $40 million grant from the Department of Energy for North America’s first offshore freshwater wind farm, located on Lake Erie about eight to 10 miles northwest of downtown Cleveland, Ohio. The funding was awarded to Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation (LEEDCo) for its “Icebreaker” project that will consist of six 3.45 megawatt turbines (20.7 MW). “Lake Erie is the Saudi Arabia of wind, and today’s award should be a gusher for northern Ohio,” Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur (OH-09) said in a recent statement . “This wind power project will begin to unleash Lake Erie’s full renewable power potential and contribute to creating a more competitive energy marketplace. LEEDCo’s innovative vision can help transform energy production and distribution for northern Ohio’s residents and thousands of businesses. Because Lake Erie serves both the U.S. and Canada this development also harkens toward a future that could link Ohio and Ontario in a new energy partnership.” Related: The world’s largest floating wind farm will be operational next year Acccording to the Cleveland Plain Dealer, LEEDCo’s decision to adopt the European-designed “Mono Bucket” foundation, which “eliminates pile driving in the bedrock below the lake bed,” might have played a role in DOE’s decision to fully fund the project. The total cost of the project is estimated to be around $120 million. In addition to previous federal grants totalling $10 million, Fred Olsen Renewables, the largest independent power producer in the United Kingdom, is expected to raise the remaining $70 million. The nation’s first offshore wind farm is on schedule for completion later this year. The Block Island Wind Farm is located in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Rhode Island. The 30-megawatt, five-turbine project is expected to produce more than 125,000 megawatt hours annually. The Lake Erie offshore wind farm is expected to be completed and operational by the end of 2018. + Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation Via Renewable Energy World Images via Flickr and Wikimedia

Read more from the original source: 
Cleveland offshore wind farm project awarded $40 million DOE grant

The UK will soon house the world’s largest offshore wind farm

February 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The UK will soon house the world’s largest offshore wind farm

A Danish wind energy giant recently announced a plan to build the world’s largest offshore wind farm  near the Yorkshire coast. The Hornsea project, as it’s being called, will take up more than 400 square kilometers about 120 km off the coast, and it should be fully operational sometime in 2020. The company behind this ambitious project is DONG Energy , Denmark’s state-backed energy utility. Read the rest of The UK will soon house the world’s largest offshore wind farm

Original post:
The UK will soon house the world’s largest offshore wind farm

Large Offshore Wind Farms Could Slow Down Incoming Hurricanes, New Study Concludes

February 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Large Offshore Wind Farms Could Slow Down Incoming Hurricanes, New Study Concludes

Research from the University of Delaware and Stanford University concludes that offshore wind turbines could have an unexpected benefit alongside their primary goal of generating renewable energy. The research team suggests that offshore wind farms could reduce wind speeds , wave heights and storm surges resulting from hurricanes, weakening their impact before they reach land. Read the rest of Large Offshore Wind Farms Could Slow Down Incoming Hurricanes, New Study Concludes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , flooding , Hurricane Katrina , Hurricane Sandy , nature climate change , offshore wind farms , offshore wind farms slow down hurricanes , renewable energy , standford university , storm surge , unversity of delaware , Wind Farms        

View post: 
Large Offshore Wind Farms Could Slow Down Incoming Hurricanes, New Study Concludes

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1137 access attempts in the last 7 days.