Touring restored wetlands at a Wisconsin nature conservancy

November 1, 2019 by  
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The village of Williams Bay, Wisconsin hasn’t changed much since Harold Friestad was a kid, he told me as we walked through Kishwauketoe Nature Conservancy (KNC). Now almost 80 and the conservancy’s chairman, Friestad is proud of being a factor in stunting the small town’s growth. He was president when the village board bought 231 acres of lakefront property in 1989 to create KNC. “What I want on my tombstone,” he said as our sneakers sank into the wetlands , “is, ‘Because of Harold, there will never be a stoplight in Williams Bay.’” Nature conservancy history The nature conservancy sits against Geneva Lake , long a summer playground for rich Chicagoans . Before that, it was home of the Potawatomi people. The name Kishwauketoe comes from a Potawatomi word meaning “lake of the sparkling water.” The current conservancy land was once a rail yard. But when the train was decommissioned, developers swooped in, wanting to build hotels, golf courses and shopping centers. Area residents wished to stop the developers and keep Williams Bay small and quiet. The Williams Bay Village Board, led by Friestad, negotiated a price of $1.575 million for the 231-acre parcel. “People knew I was a businessman,” said Friestad, who worked for Lake Geneva Cruise Line for 50 years, retiring as general manager in 2015. “They didn’t know I love nature so much.” Even though he got an excellent price — a 10-acre estate could now cost $15 million — Friestad said, “A lot of people didn’t like the idea of me spending all that money to buy it.” But now people value the conservancy, and some of Williams Bay’s 2,500 residents even bought their homes in the village so they could walk the wetland trails every day. “It’s almost sacred now,” Friestad said. “I don’t know how you put a value on it. But it’s priceless to me, and it’s priceless to many, many people.” Donations, volunteer hours, summer interns and a few part-time workers power the conservancy, which has never received tax dollars. During my weekday visit, one woman was chainsawing dead branches, a couple of folks were repairing a boardwalk and a controlled burn was going on in the distance. In the conservancy’s nearly 30-year run, the crew has restored more than 65 acres of prairie, planted a 15-acre arboretum, created a spawning area for lake trout, installed boardwalks over the wettest wetlands, cleared invasive species and constructed a four-story viewing tower. They’ve also built and continue to maintain more than 4 miles of trails. Visiting the Kishwauketoe Nature Conservancy On the October day I visited, the conservancy was quiet. I saw only a half-dozen other walkers during the hour or two I was there. Things are busier in summer, Friestad said, when up to 500 people may visit in a day. Non-human residents include deer, coyotes, foxes and raccoons. Some years, beavers move in. The conservancy has a public education campaign about the benefits of beavers, not the most-loved local animal. Reptile-wise, the conservancy is home to garter snakes and the rare Blanding’s turtle, which has a striking yellow throat. People can walk through the area on their own 365 days a year. The conservancy also offers many guided walks, some focusing on particular aspects, such as history, geology, botany or trees . Those who want to get dirt under their nails can join volunteer workdays and autumn seed harvesting. Every summer, the conservancy hosts a 5K run/walk. I’d recommend the Friday morning walk, which Friestad usually leads. Trail cams Kishwauketoe participates in the statewide Snapshot Wisconsin program, a network of trail cameras. The project provides information for wildlife managers and lets citizen scientists get involved in monitoring Wisconsin’s natural resources. Jim Killian, KNC board member, Wisconsin master naturalist program instructor and coauthor of an upcoming book on the conservancy , learned about Snapshot Wisconsin while attending a master naturalist conference in March 2018. “I immediately sought permission from the Wisconsin DNR [Department of Natural Resources] to host a wildlife trail camera for the Wisconsin Snapshot Wisconsin in KNC,” Killian said. “Because of the location and size of KNC, I learned that I qualified to host two trail cameras in our conservancy. While the program participation requirements are quite stringent, I thoroughly enjoy this volunteer work.” The cameras work with a motion sensor. “At night and in low light, the cameras utilize an infrared flash to capture images,” Killian said. “That is why they appear as black and white. One camera is located on the edge of a small open field/prairie area, while the other is located on the edge of a very dense, wooded area and on the bank of a small stream, which is a popular watering spot for wildlife of many varieties. This stream remains as a source of open water all year, including in the midst of a very cold winter.” Killian services each trail camera at least once every three months to replace the memory card and batteries and to upload the captured images to the Wisconsin DNR. The DNR places the images on a website and invites the public to help classify them. Of the thousands of images captured at KNC so far, Killian said deer are No. 1, followed by squirrels, turkeys , coyotes, raccoons, opossums, cottontail rabbits, redtail foxes, woodchucks, blue jays, cardinals, sandhill crane, northern flickers and mink. Do the trail cams reveal any surprises? “The humor of wildlife,” he said. “I would have never suspected that animals do the funniest things, including selfies, when they know or sense that their image is being captured by a camera. This is particularly true for deer.” KNC is open year-round. If you’re looking for immense peace and quiet, visit in winter … and bring your cross-country skis . + Kishwauketoe Nature Conservancy Images via Harold Friestad / Kishwauketoe Nature Conservancy, Wisconsin DNR Snapshot Wisconsin (trail cam imagery) and Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Touring restored wetlands at a Wisconsin nature conservancy

The No. 1 way to win buy-in through hearts and minds

March 29, 2018 by  
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David Williams, chief executive at Impact International, reveals the biggest pain point for managing change and the “nemawashi” opportunity.

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The No. 1 way to win buy-in through hearts and minds

How a post-growth economy can create stability

March 29, 2018 by  
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On a finite planet, endless economic growth is impossible.

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How a post-growth economy can create stability

Could auto innovation be key to closing the emissions gap?

March 29, 2018 by  
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As auto giants boost investment in autonomous and electric vehicle technology, fresh PwC research suggests which technologies could help bridge the emissions gap.

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Could auto innovation be key to closing the emissions gap?

Your Currency for Change: How to Focus Environmental Giving

June 8, 2017 by  
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By Kate Williams, CEO of 1% for the Planet Currency is something we normally think of in narrow terms: the bills or coins we fish out of wallets and pockets to pay for our morning cuppa. But we can also think of it in broader terms: the influence…

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Your Currency for Change: How to Focus Environmental Giving

Amazon data centers and the Ohio energy conundrum

June 10, 2015 by  
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Samantha Williams of the NRDC argues that Ohio’s renewable energy restrictions present a difficult obstacle for Amazon’s newly proposed data center in the state.

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Amazon data centers and the Ohio energy conundrum

Lady Liberty, Uncle Sam, and 23 Others Arrested in Cove Point Civil Disobedience

August 25, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Lady Liberty, Uncle Sam, and 23 Others Arrested in Cove Point Civil Disobedience Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , Atlantic Sunrise , Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Project , Cabot , cabot oil and gas , Climate Change , climate chaos , climate justice , Cove Point , destruction , dirty energy , drilling violations , earth , energy industry , Energy Justice Network , Energy Justice Summer , engineering , Environment , environmental engineering , environmental justice , extraction , FERC , Fossil Free , fossil fuels , fracked gas , fracked gas exports , fracking , fracking well violations , Future , gag orders , gas exports , green jobs , industry , inhabitat , livable future , Maryland , methane , natural gas , pennsylvania , pipelines , renewable energy , renewables , Susquehanna , susquehanna county , toxic , Williams , Williams companies

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Lady Liberty, Uncle Sam, and 23 Others Arrested in Cove Point Civil Disobedience

Students Design an Adorable Wedge Cabin for California’s State Parks

August 25, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Students Design an Adorable Wedge Cabin for California’s State Parks Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ACX Plywood , California State PolyTechnique University of Pomona , Cavco Industries , eco design , green design , micro cabin , off the grid cabin , sustainable design , The Wedge Cabin , tiny cabins

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Students Design an Adorable Wedge Cabin for California’s State Parks

Brilliant Pascal Stool Lights Up When You Sit on it!

August 25, 2014 by  
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Looking for a perfect energy-efficient gift for that special bookworm in your life? Well, you’re in luck because New Zealand industrial designer Holly Bradshaw-Clegg’s light-up Pascal Stool is perhaps the most energy-efficient stool on the market these days. Built to provide contoured ergonomic comfort, the stool has an integrated reading light that only turns on when pressure is applied to the seat, taking away that pesky chore of actually switching on the light. Read the rest of Brilliant Pascal Stool Lights Up When You Sit on it! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) technology , ergonomic design , furniture design , Holly Bradshaw-Clegg , New Zealand Best Awards 2014 , New Zealand industrial designer , Pascal Stool , pine wood furniture

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Brilliant Pascal Stool Lights Up When You Sit on it!

Great Glass House Holds Mediterranean Treasures at the National Botanic Garden of Wales

August 25, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Great Glass House Holds Mediterranean Treasures at the National Botanic Garden of Wales Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , energy reduction , England , Foster + Partners , Foster and Partners , garden of wales , glass hill , glass house , great glass house , green architecture , green design , greenhouse

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Great Glass House Holds Mediterranean Treasures at the National Botanic Garden of Wales

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