Louisiana wants to divert the Mississippi River to restore its coast

May 15, 2018 by  
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Of all the states dealing with global warming, Louisiana may have been hit the hardest. According to NPR , Louisiana has lost a staggering amount of coastline – more than 2,000 square miles – over the past 100 years. State officials have attempted various solutions, including levees, barrier islands, and artificial marshes, and now they want to get the Mississippi River involved to build new land. Over time, Louisiana’s levees have impeded the Mississippi from flooding land and providing necessary water and sediments to marshes, making it harder for the marshes to survive. To help with this problem, Louisiana officials hope to create sediment diversions. This would entail removing parts of the levee and directing the Mississippi to marshes in channels, with the goal of allowing silt and sand to pile up and, ultimately, build land. The state has set aside $1.3 billion for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion , the first of multiple planned diversions, and is applying for permits for the project. Related: ‘Provocative’ RIG eco-lodge designed to conserve Louisiana’s vanishing marshes Will it work? NPR cited an April 2018 Tulane University -led study scrutinizing whether or not the Mississippi River can build land fast enough. The study found that, around 1,000 years ago, the Mississippi Delta grew about two to three square miles a year. But Louisiana’s land loss has averaged 15 to 20 square miles a year during the last 100 years. Tulane’s press release on the study said, “Although river diversions that bring land building sediment to shrinking coastlands are the best solution to sustaining portions of the Mississippi Delta…the rate of land building will likely be dwarfed by the rate of wetland loss.” A net loss of land will happen, even if restoration projects do go through. But Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority engineer manager Rudy Simoneaux told NPR that it’s urgent they divert the Mississippi, saying, “The longer we wait to start doing projects, it will become more difficult to catch up.” Via NPR Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Louisiana wants to divert the Mississippi River to restore its coast

EU vote clears the way for GM crops in Europe

January 15, 2015 by  
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The European Union just opened the door for genetically modified crops in Europe after the Member Elected Parliament voted to allow countries to decide whether or not to grow them . If the crop has already been approved by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), then member states can decide to grow them or not. Read the rest of EU vote clears the way for GM crops in Europe Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: EU ban on GMO’s , european union gmo , gmo crops European Union , gmo crops UK , gmo fight , gmo’s in UK , greenpeace and gmo’s , UK gmo’s

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EU vote clears the way for GM crops in Europe

Ireland’s first shipping container home was built in just three days

January 15, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Ireland’s first shipping container home was built in just three days Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cargotecture , Ceardean Architects , container home , IMMA , Ireland , Irish architecture , Ripple Container Homes Project , shipping container housing , Solar Power , solar powered home

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Ireland’s first shipping container home was built in just three days

Scientists may have discovered life on Mars

December 17, 2014 by  
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Almost everyone has heard that there was once water on Mars, but that doesn’t answer the question of whether or not there is or was life there . But new information from NASA’s Curiosity rover might help us get one step closer to an answer. Scientists found evidence of methane spikes on the red planet’s surface, which may have come from bacteria-like organisms. If so, it could be the first time humans have ever detected alien life. Read the rest of Scientists may have discovered life on Mars Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: biology mars , curiosity rover , life on mars , mars , mars curiosity , methane life , methane mars , methane on mars , nasa , NASA Curiosity , NASA Mars , nasa missions , organic matter mars , water on mars

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Scientists may have discovered life on Mars

Glumac’s pioneering net-zero Shanghai office paves the way to greener buildings in China

December 17, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Glumac’s pioneering net-zero Shanghai office paves the way to greener buildings in China Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “leed” , “sustainable architecture” , china , Gensler , GIGA , Glumac , Glumac Shanghai , lbc , lbc full petal , LED , LEED v4 Platinum , Living Building Challenge , living building challenge full petal , net zero carbon , net zero-water , net-zero energy , shanghai , shimizu , sustainable design , sustainable interior , sustainable shanghai

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Glumac’s pioneering net-zero Shanghai office paves the way to greener buildings in China

Cass & Co.’s Copper-Infused Shapewear Claims To Reverse the Effects of Aging

May 6, 2012 by  
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Whether or not you believe that Cass & Co. ‘s new copper-infused shapewear has anti-aging properties probably depends at least in part on how much you want it to be true. Derived from Cupron, a patented form of copper oxide that supposedly grants polymers antimicrobial and antiviral properties, the fabric contains 66% raw copper, and the company claims that it’s works like a firming cream but in fabric form. Does Cass & Co.’s shapewear actually have restorative power, or is it just a bunch of pseudoscientific gobbledegook? Head over to Ecouterre and vote in our poll. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: anti-aging fashion , Cass & Co. , Cass and Company , compression garment , copper-infused shapewear , Cupron shapewear , Gadi Borkow , repair collection , shapewear

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Cass & Co.’s Copper-Infused Shapewear Claims To Reverse the Effects of Aging

Xcel Energy Threatens to Cut Solar Rebates & Efficiency Programs for Boulder Customers

October 20, 2011 by  
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Emerson 12 via flickr / CC BY 1.0 A big question in Boulder right now is whether or not voters will grant the city permission to establish a municipal utility and formally break away from Xcel Energy , which has supplied the city with power for decades. It has also provided rebate incentive programs for solar power and energy efficiency. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Xcel Energy Threatens to Cut Solar Rebates & Efficiency Programs for Boulder Customers

Evaluating Energy Sources by Human Deaths

July 13, 2011 by  
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In all the furor during the Fukushima Reactor Complex crisis , there has been a lot of discussion about whether or not nuclear power is a good option and, more generally, what kinds of power should be used to meet increasing demand. An unusual piece that was making the rounds on this topic was an article about the number of deaths per terawatt-hour (TWh) for different kinds of power production. It’s an interesting metric to use to weigh different methods of generating power. Nuclear power, interestingly, is at the bottom of the list, with only 0.04 deaths per TWh, while coal tops the list with a world average of 161 deaths per TWh. The numbers for this were calculated looking at not only at direct impacts from power station accidents, but also indirect effects, such as coal miners’ deaths and deaths due to air pollution, as well. The list gets difficult, though, when it starts to ascribe deaths in supporting industries to the total. Steel and concrete are needed to construct wind turbines, and the calculations extend to include industrial deaths in the mining and manufacture of those components, as well as transportation deaths. While it’s not unreasonable to ascribe those fractions to the overall calculation, it does make it start to get a bit tenuous. Rather than take any of these numbers as hard and fast conclusions (any two reasonable people could have long arguments over any number of assumptions in these statistics), the general trends and relative scale of each could instead be given consideration in weighing options. Although nuclear power may have a low associated death rate, the economic cost of the energy produced this way is quite high, and there is a great deal of public opposition and NIMBY reaction to new nuclear power plants. A lot of the investment in nuclear power goes to safety and security, rather than to producing power. The money spent on backups and redundant safety systems for a nuclear plant isn’t increasing power efficiency. A nuclear plant might cost as much as $8,000 (or more) per kW of electrical generating capacity (though this number is speculative, since no new nuclear plants have been built for many years), while a wind turbine might cost $1,200 to $2,600 per kW. A wind turbine won’t necessarily generate power as steadily as a reactor, but it’s a lot less expensive to build. Operating costs are another big, but rarely discussed element in favor of many renewable power systems. Actively operated electrical generating facilities need many full-time employees operating the plant’s various systems. However, solar and wind power facilities do not typically need the same active management. While the construction and installation costs may be higher, the operating costs might be far lower. Construction costs, environmental costs, operating costs, financing and regulatory costs all enter into the power generation equation. All of these factors need to be taken into account to make more reasonable decisions about power generation. link: Economics_of_new_nuclear_power_plants (Wikipedia) images: CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported by KEI at ja.wikipedia ; Wikimedia Commons

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Evaluating Energy Sources by Human Deaths

Toyota to Introduce All-Electric Scion iQ Next Year

July 11, 2011 by  
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Now that Toyota has dominated the hybrid market for a decade, the automaker is finally coming out with an all-electric in the U.S. to compete with other leading automakers’ offerings.  At a dealer meeting in Las Vegas, Toyota announced that it will launch the Scion iQ sometime next year. The Scion iQ is known as the Toyota iQ outside the U.S. and has existed as a super efficient gasoline engine car in other countries for a few years now.  The urban ultra compact EV will be a small four-passenger car that will have a 50 mile range, good for those who just need to get around town. The car has a 3+1 seating arrangement to optimize seating room within the small car.  Because of its smaller size, it will be interesting to see how much lower it’s priced compared to something like the LEAF, since we’ve recently seen that when it comes to EVs, price seens to be the biggest factor of all . Through its partnership with Tesla, Toyota will be coming out with an all-electric RAV4 in 2012 as well. via Treehugger

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Nissan LEAF Outselling Chevy Volt

July 7, 2011 by  
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The Nissan LEAF and Chevy Volt launched around the same time, both offering American drivers electric vehicle options.  Automobile magazine decided to see which car was most capturing the consumers’ attention and the LEAF came out as the clear winner so far.  Nissan has sold 3,875 LEAFs so far in 2011 while Chevy has sold 2,745 Volts. One would assume that the combination of all-electric and gasoline engine like the Volt offers would be more desirable to drivers right now since electric charging infrastructure is slowly expanding, but it seems that a price difference of $8,000 is a bigger factor. The LEAF costs $32,780 before tax incentives and rebates while the Volt starts at $41,000 . These sales numbers only reflect six months of activity, but this could be a great sign for automakers getting ready to release all-electric models, especially since these sell numbers include the production setback Nissan faced after the tsunami that hit Japan in March.  Nissan expects to deliver 10,000 – 12,000 vehicles by the end of 2011. via Automobile

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Nissan LEAF Outselling Chevy Volt

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