The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

November 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

From the Wyoming-based company Wheelhaus comes the amazing Roadhaus – a tiny house/RV hybrid that measures 10.5 feet wide and 38 feet long, but feels a lot larger. Wheelhaus wrapped the roof of the wedge-shaped home in glass, so the interior is open, airy and gets plenty of sunlight – something many small houses lack. The Roadhaus wedge, which comes with a price tag of $76,000, is certified as an RV, meaning it can be towed and parked in any RV park or campground. Its compact size of only 400 square feet provides the option of traveling the world in this beautiful tiny home on wheels. Related: Solar-powered Tesla Tiny House hits the road in Australia The little wedge is filled with some seriously smooth design features, namely the use of glass to open up the interior space. The living area, as well as the rest of the home, is flooded with natural light thanks to a spectacular raised roof that is part glass and part wood panels. In fact, the strip of wood panels that run the length of the home seems to float over the interior space. The tiny home has a comfy living room on one side and a bedroom with sufficient space for a queen-sized bed on the other. The kitchen is a beautiful space-efficient design with a sink and small stovetop, and plenty of crafty storage options. A gleaming bathroom is covered in silver tiles, adding a touch of bright modernity to the home. The entrance to the home is completely wrapped in glass, including the large door that leads out to a wooden deck jutting out from the interior. + Wheelhaus Via Treehugger Images via Wheelhaus

Go here to see the original: 
The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

"The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

November 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on "The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

A couple happened upon an astounding sight recently while strolling on the beach in Australia . At Barlings Beach in New South Wales, Brett Wallensky and partner Claudia came across thousands of bluebottles, or Portuguese man o’wars, washed up on land. Such a freaky sight could be more common as climate change impacts our world. The couple came across the horde of Portuguese man o’wars in late October. Brett Wallensky, who said he’d been stung multiple times by bluebottles as a boy, said, “There must have been thousands of them beached and they were all alive and wriggling. It was the stuff nightmares are made of…If you fell in there and got that any stings all over you I can’t imagine you would survive…The color of them was just amazing, it is so bright – almost alien.” He said he’d never seen so many bluebottles together in his life. Related: Thousands of mysterious gelatinous creatures washed up in California According to The Sydney Morning Herald , each year in Australia over 10,000 people report bluebottle stingings. The venomous creatures deliver painful stings, and according to marine biologist Christie Wilcox of the University of Hawai’i at M?noa, the stinging cells can still be active for weeks after they’re beached, so even dead bluebottles can cause pain. Wilcox recommended a vinegar rinse and the application of heat to treat a sting. Wilcox told Gizmodo mass beachings can occur when conditions are right, and that there doesn’t seem to be anything special about this specific stranding. But there’s some question of whether climate change will allow Portuguese man o’wars to thrive. According to marine biologist Lisa-ann Gershin, warmer waters amp up jellyfish metabolism, and the creatures live longer and breed more. Bluebottles could benefit from climate change like jellyfish, according to Gizmodo , and beachings could occur more often. Via Gizmodo , The Sydney Morning Herald , and StoryTrender Images via Caters Clips on YouTube and Depositphotos

Read the original post:
"The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

November 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

German architecture takes a playful turn in WERK12, a mixed-use building designed by MVRDV that’s just broke ground in Munich . Located in a post-industrial site in the emerging Werksviertel neighborhood, WERK12 draws inspiration from its industrial heritage and modern graffiti culture. To set the mood for the stylish spaces within, MVRDV teamed up with artists Engelmann and Engl to wrap the building in 5-meter-tall German slang lettering that light up at night. Located near Munich’s East Station, the 9,600-square-meter WERK12 was commissioned by OTEC GmbH & Co. KG as part of a 40-hectare urban regeneration masterplan that will create approximately 1,200 new homes and up to 7,000 new jobs. The mixed-use building will comprise loft-style offices, restaurants, sports facilities, a skyline swimming pool, and restaurants for nightlife and gastronomy. The façade’s use of giant German words, found in various youth and subculture groups, as public signage is a nod to the graffiti culture and extensive use of signage found around the area. “WERK12 is totally unique and entirely new for Munich and is a strong contrast to the historic centre just ten minutes away”, says Jacob van Rijs, MVRDV co-founder. “It is a flexible and completely user adaptable building with spaces that can transform over time with bold and expressive texts on the façade are visible from a distance. This transparent building becomes a new focal point on the new Plaza that will form the heart of the Werksviertel.” Related: China’s new futuristic library is unlike any we’ve seen before The five-floor building will be optimized for natural daylight and feature tall ceilings and airy, open spaces flexible enough for multiple uses. The high ceilings, all over 5 meter in height, allows for split levels to break up the space and add visual interest. MVRDV pushed the elevator shaft and fire escape stairs to the outside of the building to create the deep and flexible interiors, while turning the outdoor stairways into a focal point punctuated by 3.25-meter-wide terraces . WERK12 is slated for completion in February 2019. + MVRDV

Here is the original post:
German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

This tiny home looks great and has a place for everything

January 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This tiny home looks great and has a place for everything

Read the rest of This tiny home looks great and has a place for everything Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: house on wheels , portable house , small cabin , small house , tiny cabin , tiny home , tiny home living , tiny home on wheels , tiny homes , Tiny Homes on Wheels , tiny house , tiny house living , wedge , Wedge cabin , wheelhaus , wheely house

More:
This tiny home looks great and has a place for everything

Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum Berlin remembers the Holocaust to prevent future acts of genocide

January 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum Berlin remembers the Holocaust to prevent future acts of genocide

Read the rest of Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum Berlin remembers the Holocaust to prevent future acts of genocide Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Auschwitz , berlin , Daniel Libeskind , deconstrucivist architecture , germany , Holocaust , Holocaust memorial , Holocaust monument , Holocaust remembrance , Holocaust Tower , International Holocaust Remembrance Day , Jewish culture , Jewish Museum , jewish museum berlin , memorial , Museum

View original here:
Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum Berlin remembers the Holocaust to prevent future acts of genocide

Chemical pollutants are breaking polar bears’ penises

January 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Chemical pollutants are breaking polar bears’ penises

Of all the creatures on Earth impacted by reckless human activity, polar bears are having a remarkably lousy time of it. First, climate change eats away at their habitat and makes it harder to hunt , and now it looks like chemical pollutants released into the atmosphere over previous decades are causing polar bears to experience weakness or even breakage in the most sensitive of bones. As one might imagine, this doesn’t bode especially well for the continued re-population of the species. Read the rest of Chemical pollutants are breaking polar bears’ penises Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Animals , Arctic , carcinogen , chemical pollutant , edcs , global warming , limate change , north pole , pcbs , penile bone , penis bone , polar bear , Pollution

Excerpt from: 
Chemical pollutants are breaking polar bears’ penises

The solar industry is putting people to work 20 times faster than any other energy sector

January 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The solar industry is putting people to work 20 times faster than any other energy sector

It turns out that solar isn’t just the way to go for power needs, but jobs as well . While “green jobs” may not be a huge political buzz word this year, it should be, because the solar power jobs sector grew 20 times faster than any other sector, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, the number of solar jobs has surpassed the number of coal mining jobs, a hopeful sign for both alternative energy and job growth. Read the rest of The solar industry is putting people to work 20 times faster than any other energy sector Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alternative energy , alternative energy jobs , green jobs , green power , job creation , new jobs , oil and gas jobs , oil layoffs , solar jobs , solar panels , Solar Power

See the original post here: 
The solar industry is putting people to work 20 times faster than any other energy sector

Bad Behavior has blocked 2965 access attempts in the last 7 days.