Tom Di Liberto: Plan for extreme weather but be optimistic

August 31, 2015 by  
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“America’s Science Idol” DiLiberto says data tools are available to provide a fairly accurate picture of what extreme weather events will happen in the future. He’s a meteorologist with the Famine Early Warning System, which forecasts flooding and droughts in the developing world, Along with working to mitigate climate change, Di Liberto suggests that businesses plan around a future of extreme weather, using data to figure out where it will occur.

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Tom Di Liberto: Plan for extreme weather but be optimistic

How a new tool can help make supply chains stronger, more sustainable

September 3, 2012 by  
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Building resilient supply chains is essential in an era when increasing extreme weather events around the world are disrupting commerce, and human rights concerns can quickly damage reputations.

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How a new tool can help make supply chains stronger, more sustainable

Hailstorms and Tornadoes Thrive on Car Exhaust

January 3, 2012 by  
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If you wanted something else to blame on the internal combustion engine, you can now add tornadoes and hailstorms to the list.  Scientists have found that both weather events are more likely to occur during the week than the weekend due to the higher levels of pollution in the air from our workday commutes. The study, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres , looked at summer storm patterns in the eastern U.S. from 1995 to 2009 and found that hailstorms were occurring at a rate of about 20 percent above average midweek and about 20 percent below average on Saturday and Sunday. The team then looked at EPA records of summertime air pollution in the eastern U.S. and found that it peaks midweek. The reason is that water particles cling to pollutants in the air, floating up higher in the atmosphere where it’s colder and creating more hail.  Pollutants also create tornado-friendly conditions by making the air warmer. The western U.S. doesn’t experience this same phenomenon since the air is dryer and cloud masses are too high and cold for the air pollution to interfere with. via National Geographic

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Hailstorms and Tornadoes Thrive on Car Exhaust

Progression of US Cities Reaching Solar Grid Parity

December 31, 2011 by  
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Grid parity in cost between solar power and grid-supplied electricity is likely to begin being reached in the US in as little as 2 years, and within the next 25 years, many of the largest metropolitan areas will reach the point where solar is less expensive. An animated map from Energy Self Reliant States shows the picture. This timeline includes no government subsidies in the calculations. It uses a baseine cost of solar power in 2011 at $4.00 per watt, installed. Using the average residential grid supplied electricity price for each metro area, it makes the two assumptions based on present trends to determine when the price of solar drops below grid: the cost of solar decreases by 7% per year, and the grid electricity price increases by 2% per year. Based on these assumptions, the San Diego CA metropolitan area will be at solar parity in 2013, and within the next 25 years, many of the largest metropolitan areas will reach the point where solar is less expensive. via: BoingBoing

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Progression of US Cities Reaching Solar Grid Parity

Turn the Eiffel Tower Green?

December 30, 2011 by  
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A concept to turn the Eiffel Tower into a giant green wall has been proposed as a symbolic statement of “the reconciliation of nature and mankind.”The plan calls for 600,000 plants to be attached to the structure using hemp sacks filled with soil as the growth media. An irrigation system comprising 12 tons of tubing would be used to provide water for the plants. The installation would not be permanent, and would be removed after a few years. But, once in place, the installation would help remove an estimated 87.8 tons of CO2 from the atmosphere. “Should it not be the duty of engineers to imagine a new future where nature is brought back into the heart of the city,” said a statement from Ginger, the company behind the proposal. With an estimated cost of nearly 100 million dollars for the project, that’s more than a million dollars per ton of CO2. Hardly the most cost effective carbon sequestration, but certainly a visible one. image: CC-BY 3.0 by Taxiarchos228 via: Sustainablog

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Turn the Eiffel Tower Green?

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