The Springingstream Guesthouse mimics the mountains of China with an undulating roof

January 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Springingstream Guesthouse mimics the mountains of China with an undulating roof

Beijing-based studio WEI Architects renovated an abandoned building in China’s remote Fujian province into a beautiful guest home using traditional materials and construction techniques. The architects breathed new life into the Springingstream Guesthouse by installing reclaimed materials and creating a series of undulating roofs that mimic the outline of the mountainous landscape. The guest home is located in a remote valley that has been abandoned over the years. Although the majority of the homes in the area are derelict, there is a new movement to preserve the history of the area . WEI Architects were commissioned to develop a project that could serve as a prototype for restoring the existing properties in an attempt to revitalize the village. The project was even part of a national TV program, which drew a lot of attention to the efforts. Related: Wavy green-roofed Casa Jura disappears into France’s rolling hills The existing structure was an old home that had been abandoned for years. The architects worked carefully to bring it back to life while retaining as much as the existing structure as possible. The home’s old timber panels and various materials were used in the new structure, while stone bases and other materials were locally-sourced. Local labor was also used to restore the old building using traditional methods. “Local villagers with building techniques were hired to ensure the traditional construction methods, like the mortise-and-tenon structure and special transformational window-door framing,” said the architects. The architects were also inspired by the local scenery, which they used as a guide to create a serene atmosphere. The home is located on the banks of a stream that cuts through the mountainous landscape, and its undulating roof mimics its stunningly beautiful backdrop. Additionally, the undulating roof juts out over the structure, creating covered verandahs for the main home, as well as for a guest home that was erected on the site of the former sheep pens. Landscaping made of local plants and stones creates a rustic walking path that connects the two structures. The completed building will serve as a bed and breakfast that generates income for the community. Accordingly, the interior design blends tradition with modern comforts for visiting guests. The interior layout follows the local tradition of arranging the rooms around a central hearth. Exposed brick and traditional furniture also pay homage to the home’s history. Although seeped in tradition, the renovated guest home does have a few modern touches. A copper path set within the poured concrete flooring runs from the entrance to a lounge space and then a covered outdoor terrace that serves as the tea room. The second floor of the structure houses two bedrooms that feature large windows with movable wooden panels that provide natural ventilation and stunning views of the scenery. + WEI Architects Via Dezeen Images via WEI Architects

Read the original here:
The Springingstream Guesthouse mimics the mountains of China with an undulating roof

Ice melting due to climate change in Norway reveals pre-Viking artifacts

January 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ice melting due to climate change in Norway reveals pre-Viking artifacts

Climate change is melting ice in high mountains, enabling archaeologists to discover artifacts once preserved in glacial ice in Scandinavia, North America, and the Alps. A team led by Lars Pilø of the Oppland City Council recently published their discoveries on artifacts, many related to reindeer hunting, in Royal Society Open Science , and Pilø wrote in a Secrets of the Ice blog post , “This is a new and fantastic archaeological record of past human activity in some of the most remote and forbidding landscapes.” Pilø said in the post, “The ice has acted like a time machine, preserving the finds through millennia like a giant prehistoric deep-freezer.” His team has conducted fieldwork in the mountains of Oppland County in Norway over more than ten years, and they’ve come up with some impressive finds. Pilø said they’ve recovered over 2,000 artifacts. Related: Archaeologist may have uncovered the second Viking settlement in North America Some of their discoveries date all the way back to 4,000 BC. They’ve uncovered arrows; remains of pack horses, sleds, and skis; and clothing from the Iron Age and Bronze Age . Ice melting is unveiling what the research paper abstract described as “a fragile record of alpine activity, especially hunting and the use of mountain passes.” In the article, the researchers share radiocarbon dates of 153 items, and they compared those dates against the timing of economic changes or environmental changes, like periods of warming or cooling. They came up with a few surprises; for example, while you’d expect cold temperatures to keep people out of the highest elevations in Norway, like in the Late Antique Little Ice Age from around 536 – 660 CE, it seems hunters kept going into the mountains. Archaeologist James Barrett of the University of Cambridge told Ars Technica , “Remarkably, though, the finds from the ice may have continued through this period, perhaps suggesting that the importance of mountain hunting (mainly for reindeer), increased to supplement failing agricultural harvests in times of low temperatures.” Nine researchers from multiple Norwegian universities, the University of Oxford, and the University of Cambridge contributed. + Glacial Archaeology, Ancient Reindeer Hunting, and Climate Change + Secrets of the Ice Via Ars Technica Images via Øystein Rønning-Andersen, Secrets of the Ice/Oppland Count Council; Johan Wildhagen, Palookaville; and secretsoftheice.com/Oppland County Council

View original here:
Ice melting due to climate change in Norway reveals pre-Viking artifacts

Bad Behavior has blocked 1327 access attempts in the last 7 days.