Hydroelectric art gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self-sustaining

February 27, 2020 by  
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London-based architect Margot Krasojevic has just unveiled a futuristic art gallery that runs on hydroelectric power. Slated for the coastal Russian region of Sochi, the Hydroelectric Sculpture Gallery will harness enough wave energy to not only be 100% self-sufficient, but it will also be able to channel surplus energy back into the grid, powering around 200 nearby houses and businesses as a result. The art gallery will be located on Sochi’s coastline, where it will use the exceptionally strong coastal swells from the Black Sea to power a water turbine system . Krasojevic’s vision depicts a sculptural volume that rises out of an existing wooden promenade. The building, which will be partly submerged into the sea, will be strategically angled at 45 degrees to the coastline for maximum wave exposure. Related: Oil rig off South Korea’s coast to become a floating hotel that operates on tidal energy According to the design plans, the building will “use the environment’s characteristics to generate clean, sustainable energy, without affecting the quality and nature of the landscape.” State-of-the-art engineering will allow the structure to harvest wave energy through oscillating water columns as the waves crash against it. Generating up to 300kW, the system will enable the gallery to operate completely off the grid and channel surplus energy back into the grid. It could supply clean energy to approximately 200 households and businesses in the same area. Visitors to the futuristic gallery will enter through a long walkway stretching out from the shore. The robust exterior of the building will comprise various walkways and ramps that wind around the steel structure. Sinuous volumes will conceal the building’s many turbines, which will also be partially submerged underwater. Inside, the spaces will reflect the building’s functions. The various galleries will be laid out into a power plant format, with steel clad ceilings that mimic the rolling waves that crash into the exterior. Irregularly shaped skylights will also create a vibrant, kaleidoscope show of shadow and light throughout the day. + Margot Krasojevic Images via Margot Krasojevic

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Hydroelectric art gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self-sustaining

First-of-its-kind device prototype harnesses renewable energy from ocean waves

October 16, 2019 by  
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Our planet is a water world, covered with 70 percent oceans. For centuries, it’s been widely known that the high seas can generate energy, if harnessed appropriately. With today’s renewables market rapidly expanding, it’s no wonder then that wave energy has recently gained traction as a contemporary, clean energy source. Two companies have jointly completed a marine hydrokinetic convertor, the OE Buoy, to leverage wave power as a renewable, green energy source. The city of Portland, Oregon is corporate headquarters to Vigor, a marine and industrial fabrication company that has had a long-standing record of cutting edge engineering projects. For this endeavor, Vigor teamed up with Irish wave-power pioneer Ocean Energy in a collaborative effort to push marine hydrokinetic technologies forward. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) helped to fund the $12 million design project. Related: Renewable energy surpasses fossil fuels in the UK Weighing 826 tons, the OE Buoy wave device measures 125 feet long, 59 feet wide and 68 feet tall. It will be deployed at the U.S. Navy Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) on the windward side of the Hawaiian island of Oahu, off the coast of Naval Base Pearl Harbor. The buoy has the potential to generate up to 1.25 megawatts of electrical power. In other words, it has enough utility-quality electricity supply to support marine-based data centers, desalination plants, naval autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) power platforms, offshore fish farming and off-grid applications for remote island communities. Besides that, the buoy has the capacity to greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, making it a cleaner, more sustainable source of renewable energy . “This first-of-its kind wave energy convertor is scalable, reliable and capable of generating sustainable power to facilitate a range of use-cases that were previously unimaginable or just impractical,” said John McCarthy, CEO of Ocean Energy. “This internationally significant project will be invaluable to job creation, renewable energy generation and greenhouse gas reduction. Additionally, technology companies will be able to benefit from wave power through the development of OE Buoy devices as marine-based data storage and processing centers. The major players in Big Data are already experimenting with subsea data centers to take advantage of the energy savings by cooling these systems in the sea. OE Buoy now presents them with the potential double-benefit of ocean cooling and ocean energy in the one device.” + Vigor + Ocean Energy Via OPB Image via Tiluria

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First-of-its-kind device prototype harnesses renewable energy from ocean waves

Self-sustainable childrens center in Tanzania harvests water like a baobab tree

October 16, 2019 by  
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In northern Tanzania, a Swedish team of architects, engineers and a non-profit collaborated with local workers to complete the Econef Children’s Center, a self-sustaining facility for orphans in the King’ori village. Asante Architecture & Design , Lönnqvist & Vanamo Architects , Architects Without Borders Sweden, Engineers Without Borders Sweden and Swedish-Tanzanian NGO ECONOF created the center to provide sleeping quarters and classrooms to orphaned children, as well as to also increase ECONEF’s independence by reducing building maintenance and operation costs. The off-grid buildings are powered with solar energy and harvest rainwater in a system inspired by the African baobab tree. Built to follow the local building vernacular, the Econef Children’s Center uses locally found materials and building techniques to keep costs low and to minimize the need for external construction expertise. The new center provides sleeping quarters and classrooms for 25 children. “The aim of the Children’s Center Project is to increase ECONEF’S independence and reduce its reliance on private donations,” explains the team in a project statement. “To help achieve this goal the new buildings are planned to be ecologically and economically sustainable and largely maintenance free. The center produces its own electricity through the installation of solar panels. Systems for rainwater harvesting and natural ventilation are integrated into the architectural design.” Related: Timber-clad waterfront house in Norway epitomizes modern Scandinavian design Inspired by the African baobab tree that can retain up to 120,000 liters of water in its trunk to survive in the desert, the building’s rainwater harvesting system draws rainwater from the roof’s spine through a central gutter that funnels the water into two water tanks tucked beneath the two of the inner courtyards. The collected rainwater is used for showers and laundry. + ECONEF Images by Robin Hayes

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Artist unveils furniture collection for insects

October 16, 2019 by  
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As the world’s insect population plummets , it is becoming more and more important to create insect-friendly habitats. Now, you can have one right in your own backyard! French designer Marlène Huissoud has just unveiled “Please Stand By” — a series of sculptures designed to be safe shelters for insects living in urban areas. The collection comprises a series of “hotels” designed specifically for pollinators such as bees , wasps and butterflies. Made out of unfired clay in neutral tones to keep them as primitive as possible, the furnishings are covered in a natural binder to make them resistant to extreme weather. The insect accommodations are punctuated with multiple holes to let the insects move around freely. Related: MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees According to Huissoud, her inspiration for creating the insect homes comes from a recent scientific study that shows that more than 40 percent of insects are in decline, and the situation is getting worse every year. In order to bring attention to the plight of the world’s insect population , the artist created the insect-friendly habitats to offer a safe refuge for the critters to nest and hibernate within urban areas. “We have been selfish,” Huissoud said. “We all have used resources of our dear planet. But it is not a time to cry, it is a time to act. As a designer, it is important to design a chair at some point in your career, and I liked the idea of dedicating my first chair to insects and not humans, asking humans to ‘Please Stand By’ and look at nature and wildlife in general with a new eye.” The unique collection was first unveiled during London’s Design Week , but it can now be found in Huissoud’s studio in Paris. She hopes to install the pieces in various gardens in order to help support the insect population. + Marlène Huissoud Via Dezeen Photography by Valentin Russo and Chloe Bell via Marlène Huissoud

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Artist unveils furniture collection for insects

This carbon nanotube yarn generates power when pulled

August 28, 2017 by  
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Power-producing materials are the stuff of wearable inventors’ dreams. And scientists just created a yarn that generates electricity with a simple tug. The yarn, comprised of carbon nanotubes and submerged in an electrolyte gel, isn’t ideal for sweaters – but can harvest power from a wearer’s breathing. And there’s another surprising application: it could collect energy from ocean waves . An international team of 29 researchers devised the the yarn material, known as twistron harvesters, “by tying a carbon nanotube string into a tangled weave of carbon and submerging it into an electrolyte gel,” according to Science Magazine. When covered in gel and tugged, the yarn can illuminate a light-emitting diode with a small current. The yarn’s peak power generation – when strands are hooked together – is 250 watts per kilogram, and Ars Technica pointed out a professional cyclist’s peak exertions are only around 10 percent of that figure. Related: New type of fabric harvests energy from the sun and movement The researchers tested the yarn by sewing it in to a shirt, and saw it generated a tiny amount of electricity as the wearer breathed in and out. The researchers also connected the yarn to an artificial muscle – a polymer that contracts when warmed, according to Ars Technica – and were able to convert fluctuations in temperature into energy . A still more unexpected way the yarn could be used is in wave power . The material operates when it’s placed in saltwater similar to the ocean, and the motion of the waves moves the yarn, allowing it to generate power. Ars Technica notes the device does need a platinum electrode as seawater can be corrosive. The proof of concept yarn strands aren’t yet powerful enough to brighten a home, but the scientists say their technology is scalable. The journal Science published the research in late August. Scientists from institutions in South Korea, the United States, and China contributed to the study. Via Science Magazine and Ars Technica Images via The University of Texas at Dallas and screenshot

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This carbon nanotube yarn generates power when pulled

World’s first wave energy microgrid project due off Western Australia coast

November 4, 2015 by  
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Wave power offers huge promise as a source of clean energy, and now Australia’s Carnegie Wave Energy is taking the technology to bold new places with the world’s first wave-integrated renewable energy microgrid project to be connected to an electricity network. Cleantechnica reports that Carnegie’s Garden Island Microgrid Project will include the company’s CETO 6 array, which is currently in progress – along with an existing reverse osmosis desalination plant that was fired up last week. The project will also boast two megawatts peak solar PV power, along with enough storage for safe, stable and reliable connections to the larger power grid. Click here to view the embedded video. Carnegie is already shipping power from offshore to the mainland of Australia via its CETO 5 array, which went online off the coast of Perth just seven months ago. CETO 6 just left the conceptual phase two weeks ago, but it’s expected to produce about four times more power than its predecessor – maxing out at 1 megawatt of generation. Related: United States investing $10 million in wave power projects Carnegie CEO Michael Ottavaiano said Western Australia is a great place to build a project like this because there’s no need to build and maintain long transmission lines to coastal communities. He added that the Garden Island project, as it’s known, will also help demonstrate the potential the company sees to integrate its wave energy technology into islands and fringe grid applications, or basically wherever strong waves are to be found. “Carnegie’s island power projects will invariably involve integrating CETO with other renewable energy power sources, desalination plants, diesel generation and increasingly energy storage,” he said in a statement on Thursday,” Ottaviano told Cleantechnica . “This project will also be a great opportunity to demonstrate a real world, wave integrated microgrid system to our island customers.” Via Cleantechnica Images and video via Carnegie Wave Energy

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World’s first wave energy microgrid project due off Western Australia coast

Perth’s Carnegie Wave Energy project produces power AND fresh water from the motion of the ocean

March 20, 2015 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. The Carnegie Perth Wave Energy Project is rolling out its multimillion-dollar plans to prove that waves can generate real power for the electric grid on land. Submerged in the roiling seas off the coast of Perth in Western Australia, buoy-like CETO technologies will harness energy from incoming swells and convert it into electricity and desalinated water—no greenhouse gas emissions required. Read the rest of Perth’s Carnegie Wave Energy project produces power AND fresh water from the motion of the ocean Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , australia , Carnegie Perth Wave Energy Project , carnegie wave energy , CETO 5 , CETO 6 , CETO technologies , clean technology , desalination , garden island , HMAS Stirling , hydraulic energy , hydraulic power , perth , renewable energy , wave energy , wave power , western australia

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Perth’s Carnegie Wave Energy project produces power AND fresh water from the motion of the ocean

Newman Architects’ Slover Library blends old and new in historic renovation

March 20, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Newman Architects’ Slover Library blends old and new in historic renovation Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: downtown Norfolk , newman architects , Norfolk , project of the year , public buildings , public works , renovations of public buildings , slover library , virginia library

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Newman Architects’ Slover Library blends old and new in historic renovation

New report shows that Scotland could be fossil fuel-free by 2030

January 8, 2015 by  
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A new WWF-backed study by consultancy giant DNV-G L shows that Scotland can go 100% fossil fuel-free by the year 2030, and that it could reduce carbon intensity from 271 grams of CO2 per kilowatt hour to 50g CO2/kwh. The plan outlined in the report is separate from the government’s goal of providing 100% of electricity demand from renewables by 2020, which currently would still allow for the use of coal and gas in energy generation. Read the rest of New report shows that Scotland could be fossil fuel-free by 2030 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “wind power” , carbon emissions , carbon footprint , DNV-GL , Fossil Free , fossil free Scotland , Scotland , scotland energy , tidal power , wave power , wwf

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New report shows that Scotland could be fossil fuel-free by 2030

Norwegian Scientists Unveil Plans for First Underwater Storage Power Plant

May 20, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock A team of Norwegian research scientists has unveiled a concept that could see electricity stored on the seabed. Conceived by Subhydro AS , the underwater pumped hydroelectric power plant would use high water pressure to create energy that can then be stored for later use on shore. Read the rest of Norwegian Scientists Unveil Plans for First Underwater Storage Power Plant Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: energy storage , renewable energy , SINTEF , subhydro , Subhydro AS , tidal power , water pressure , wave power        

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