Native Shoes’ Bloom collection is made of repurposed algae

May 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Many conventional shoes are made with materials sourced from petroleum, but conscientious companies, like Native Shoes, have been rethinking that choice, digging for solutions in using readily available and eco-friendly materials instead. For Native Shoes, turning to algae , which naturally occurs in lakes and rivers, presented a benefit that is two-fold. Algae take oxygen from the water, and if oxygen levels deplete too much, they can kill off fish and become toxic to humans. Although algae often serve as food for aquatic life, removing some algae from the water makes it safer for the entire ecosystem. But then what do you do with all of this excess algae that has been removed? Native Shoes’ Bloom collection is made using “Rise by Bloom” technology that repurposes the algae, transforming it into a high-performance material for the shoes. The company stated, “The innovative manufacturing process cleans up to 80L of water and 50 square meters of air per pair, resulting in cleaner lakes and rivers , healthier air and featherlight footwear.” Related: Algae Lamps are a work of art and natural shade in one The newest line builds on Native Shoes’ classic Jefferson model, with designs for women and children in new colors to welcome spring and warmer weather. The collection also includes the new Audrey Bloom, a classic, feminine flat; the Jefferson Bloom Child features a slip-on, slip-off kids’ shoe . The Jefferson Bloom is priced at $45, the Audrey Bloom is $55 and the Jefferson Bloom Child starts at $40. Native Shoes’ mission is to fuse innovation with sustainability to create comfortable, durable shoes that leave a small footprint on the planet. According to Native Shoes, the company hopes to find alternative uses for all of its products by 2023 in a goal to “Live Lightly.” As such, it has created initiatives such as the Native Shoes Remix Project, which recycles the shoes into playground equipment for local kids in Vancouver. Native Shoes is also experimenting with 3D printing and more plant-based designs. + Native Shoes Images via Native Shoes

Read more from the original source: 
Native Shoes’ Bloom collection is made of repurposed algae

These sustainable shoes by Rackle are made from hemp

May 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on These sustainable shoes by Rackle are made from hemp

What better way to put your best eco-friendly foot forward than with a stylish, comfortable pair of sustainable shoes? Rackle, a Boston-based footwear brand, is on a mission to create sustainable shoes, starting with the release of its hemp-based Alex line. The unisex Alex sneakers come in three color options that include redwood, natural and blue. Weighing in at only 6 ounces, these shoes are better suited for leisure and errands than athletics, but they still offer a supportive, tri-density foam sole with EcoPure foam that aids in biodegradation and a hemp-based upper material. Each pair comes with two sets of laces — solid and checkered — each of which are made from a combination of hemp and 100% recycled materials. The shoes aim to meld style, versatility and sustainability. Related: Good Clothing releases capsule collection made from hemp and organic cotton “Rackle uses innovative plant-based materials, such as industrial hemp, in our products,” said Joe Napurano, senior designer for Rackle. “We also incorporated a special foam sole technology that promotes biodegradation. Once your shoes have completed their life of providing you style and comfort, we’ll help you find a home for them through our non-profit partners, or should you discard, they are designed to breakdown in just one year under active enclosed landfill conditions.” Choosing hemp was a calculated decision. It grows faster than cotton yet requires a fraction of the water to grow. Plus, it is antimicrobial and is a durable and washable material. Hemp is a sustainable product that has become popular in the shoe industry because of its eco-friendliness and the ease with which it converts into a strong fiber. According the company’s website, “The 100% sustainable hemp upper is made of high grade hemp and provides year-round comfort and support thanks to the plant’s natural benefits: cool in the summer and warm in the winter; anti-microbial; lightweight; water-resistant; UV-resistant; and extremely durable.” + Rackle Images via Rackle

View original post here:
These sustainable shoes by Rackle are made from hemp

WKE LifeProof phone cases use recycled ocean-bound waste

May 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on WKE LifeProof phone cases use recycled ocean-bound waste

In an effort to find a balance between protecting the significant investment in our cellular devices and protecting the planet, LifeProof has developed a phone case that sources materials diverted from the ocean  and simultaneously supports organizations directly involved in providing safe water, protecting ocean life and maintaining river habitat.  W?KE, the newest case line from LifeProof, is made from 85% recycled plastic waste. Materials for the protective case are sourced from fishing nets and ropes to help prevent those plastics from reaching the ocean. The plastics are then woven into a polypropylene material that is both durable and strong. This practice reduces the need to produce virgin plastic, and the company also offers a program to recycle your phone case when you decide to make a change.  Related: Adorable baby gorilla wants you to recycle your phone As a company, LifeProof has long strived to make its cases more sustainable and find ways to give back to the Earth. “LifeProof’s existence has centered around two things: a love of the water and an innate need to give back,” said Jim Parke, LifeProof CEO. “With this new case and the charitable partnerships we’ve formed, we’re not only creating products that help ensure a longer,  repurposed life for plastics  from the fishing industry, we’re supporting water organizations that can make an even larger impact than we would be able to alone.” The water organizations he refers to are long-established non-profits on a mission to provide clean water  to underprivileged communities, protect coral across the ocean floor and maintain healthy rivers for communities and wildlife.  According to a press release from LifeProof, “With the purchase any LifeProof case, including existing lines like FR?, NËXT and SL?M, and registration of the case at lifeproof.com/makewaves, we’ll donate a dollar to one of three charities who share our vision for a world with clean water for all – Water.org, the Coral Reef Alliance or American Rivers.” The W?KE case is currently available for the Apple iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max, iPhone 11, iPhone XR, iPhone SE (2nd Generation), iPhone 8, iPhone 7, iPhone 6s and Samsung Galaxy S20 and Galaxy S20+. It is also available to preorder for Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra. Cases are priced at $39.99. + LifeProof  Images via LifeProof 

Continued here: 
WKE LifeProof phone cases use recycled ocean-bound waste

Invasive "murder hornets" arrive in US, threaten honeybees

May 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Invasive "murder hornets" arrive in US, threaten honeybees

If you’ve been itching to get back to the outside world, two words might make you think again: murder hornets. For the first time, these gigantic, invasive hornets have been spotted in the U.S., which could be a problem for both humans and honeybees . The Washington State Department of Agriculture verified four sightings of Vespa mandarinia — the official name for the Asian giant hornet — last December. But after The New York Times recently reported on them, murder hornets have moved into the limelight. Related: How to live harmoniously with bees and wasps The black-and-yellow hornets measure up to two inches long and have bulging eyes. “They’re like something out of a monster cartoon with this huge yellow-orange face,” said Susan Cobey, bee breeder at Washington State University’s (WSU) Department of Entomology. “It’s a shockingly large hornet,” Todd Murray, WSU Extension entomologist and invasive species specialist, said. “It’s a health hazard, and more importantly, a significant predator of honeybees.” The hornets are native to the forests and mountains of eastern and southeast Asia, where they feast on large insects . One of their favorite foods is the European honeybee. Scientists in Washington worry that if the hornets spread, they could decimate the state’s honeybees, which farmers rely on to pollinate apple and cherry crops. Invasive species like murder hornets can permanently alter an ecosystem. “Just like that, it’s forever different,” Murray said. “We need to teach people how to recognize and identify this hornet while populations are small, so that we can eradicate it while we still have a chance.” WSU and the state agriculture department are working with beekeepers and volunteers to locate the enormous hornets before they become too active again. April is the month when queens usually emerge from hibernation, so the hornets are just getting started. Obviously, the consequences will be devastating if these creatures manage to spread across the country. While humans are not the hornets’ typical target, the hornets will attack anything if they feel threatened. When a group of hornets attack, they can inject as much venom as a snake bite. Murder hornets kill up to 50 people in Japan every year. + Washington State University Image via LiCheng Shih

Read the original:
Invasive "murder hornets" arrive in US, threaten honeybees

Hitch is a reusable water bottle and coffee cup in one

May 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Hitch is a reusable water bottle and coffee cup in one

Coffee is a popular start to the day for millions of people. There’s nothing quite like the scent of coffee wafting through the air and that first sip to get you started on the right foot. But an estimated 3 billion paper cups end up in the landfills each year — cups that mostly can’t be recycled due to the mixed materials, including plastic . The solution, of course, is reusable coffee cups; however, many people have struggled to incorporate that addition into the host of other items that travel with them daily. So Remaker Labs, a San Diego-based company, has carefully designed a to-go cup that you won’t even notice you’re carrying. As co-founder Sky Gilbar explained, “The essence of the problem is that people already carry so much — water bottle, phone, chargers, laptops, and other essentials — that their hands and bags are full, so carrying a reusable cup all day on top of all that is just too inconvenient.” Related: This aluminum water bottle is a reusable alternative to single-use plastic Hitch, the first product launched on Kickstarter by Sky Gilbar and David Silverander, is a full-sized, fully insulated and leak-proof 12-ounce cup that fits inside a water bottle — similar to the one you likely already carry, making it easy to bring along your reusable cup without making the choice between that and a water bottle. While your cup “Hitch(es)” a ride inside your 18-ounce insulated stainless steel water bottle, it easily slides out for use. The lid for the water bottle doubles as a leak-proof lid for your cup. Plus, you can lock the cup on top of the water bottle for easy one-hand carries. The dual-cup design also fits into most standard cup holders. Hitch is carbon-neutral , and a portion of each Kickstarter pledge is used to plant a tree via One Tree Planted and remove 1kg of ocean-bound plastic via Plastic Bank. Join the zero-waste movement along with the other backers on the Hitch Kickstarter campaign, which is set to end May 28, 2020. + Remaker Labs Images via Remaker Labs

Here is the original: 
Hitch is a reusable water bottle and coffee cup in one

Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors

May 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors

Researchers in a new U.K.-led study found a staggering volume of microplastics on the seafloor. At up to 1.9 million pieces on a single square meter, it’s the highest level on record. “We were really shocked by the volume of microplastics we found deposited on the deep seafloor bed,” Dr. Ian Kane of the University of Manchester, lead author of the study, told CNN. “It was much higher than anything we have seen before.” Researchers collected sediment samples from the Tyrrhenian Sea off  Italy’s  west coast. While  garbage  patches composed of plastic bags, bottles and straws are old news, scientists say the floating plastic doesn’t even account for 1% of the 10 million tons of plastic that wind up in the oceans annually. The new study seems to confirm what scientists have suspected: much of that plastic is deep down on the seafloor. The study, published in  Science ,  concludes that episodic turbidity currents, which are akin to underwater avalanches, rapidly transport microplastics down to the seafloor. Then, deep-sea currents work like conveyor belts, transporting microplastics along the bottom of the ocean and accumulating in what researchers called “microplastic hotspots.” Most of these microplastics are fibers from  clothes  and textiles that waste water treatment plants fail to filter out because they are so tiny. This is the first time  scientists have directly linked currents to plastic concentrations on the seafloor. The study’s authors hope this work will help predict future hotspots and the impact of microplastics on marine life. Unfortunately, though the plastics may be tiny, they can have a huge impact. “Microplastics can be ingested by many forms of marine life,” said Chris Thorne, oceans campaigner at  Greenpeace  U.K., “and the chemical contaminants they carry may even end up being passed along the food chain all the way to our plates.” Thorne has called for people to rethink “throwaway plastic.” + CNN Images via Oregon State University , Bo Eide , and Dronepicr

Read the original here:
Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors

Peaceful floating villa in Australia runs on solar energy

May 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Peaceful floating villa in Australia runs on solar energy

Australian architect Chuck Anderson has created a beautiful, solar-powered floating villa that has us dreaming of brighter days. Anchored just north of Sydney’s Palm Beach, the Lilypad is meant for those travelers who are looking to spend a little down time on serene waters while staying true to their sustainable lifestyles. Engineered with sustainability and luxury in mind, the Lilypad is a two-story floating villa with a wraparound porch and a gabled roof. Clad in timber, the guest home runs on solar power and is made with eco-friendly materials that help it respectfully blend into the water on which it floats. Related: Sail your worries away on this solar-powered floating tiny home The floating home itself is marked by an expansive front deck, which includes plenty of space to take in the views while sunbathing, dining al fresco with the barbecue setup or enjoying a relaxing massage. From the open-air terrace, large sliding glass doors open completely to the interior. On the ground floor, a large living room with ample seating and a fireplace connects to a fully equipped kitchen and wine cellar. A set of stairs leads to the upper floor, which includes a king-sized bed and a spa-like bathroom. A contemporary interior design, highlighted by ample natural light, creates a soothing atmosphere that is guaranteed to help you to disconnect. The idyllic floating villa, which is available to rent starting at just over $1,000, also includes several added amenities. For meals, guests of the Lilypad will enjoy a continental breakfast as well as chef-prepared lunch and dinner delivered throughout the day. For those looking for a little action and adventure, the guest house comes with paddle boards, fishing gear and additional active travel equipment. As an extra bonus, guests will have full access to a 24-hour concierge who can arrange for on-site massages as well as picnic setups on a nearby beach. + Lilypad Images via Lilypad

View post:
Peaceful floating villa in Australia runs on solar energy

Should you make sourdough starter?

April 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Should you make sourdough starter?

Because the pandemic has ushered in a back-to-the-kitchen movement, social media is filled with gorgeous, professional-looking loaves of sourdough bread. Is it easy to make a sourdough starter? Should you jump on the sourdough bandwagon? Here’s what you need to know about making a sourdough starter. Initial reservations Making sourdough starter has one big advantage. It only requires two ingredients: flour and water. It’s like magic, how these two ingredients , plus time, can produce yeast. Really, it’s more like science. As it says on the King Arthur Flour website, “Wild yeast is in the air around us. It settles on kitchen work surfaces and in your ingredients, including flour. Add liquid to flour, and this wild yeast is activated and starts to produce carbon dioxide bubbles. This growing army of gas bubbles, effectively trapped by gluten within the dough, are what ultimately make sourdough bread rise.” Related: How to bake bread Together, the yeast and lactobacilli form a harmonious symbiotic relationship right on your countertop. Making your own yeast out of thin air is especially popular now, since the yeast supply chain has dried up as the pandemic turns us into a nation of home bakers. But as I read online guidance about how to create my starter, I had some reservations. First, I don’t have filtered water. I drink good ol’ Oregon tap water that has some small amount of chlorine , which isn’t good for sourdough starter. Second, my online sources advised keeping the starter at room temperature, which they claimed was 70 degrees. Not in my house, which currently ranges between the upper 50s and low 60s. My third reservation was that you must constantly “feed” the starter with flour, each time discarding much of the starter. In the name of science (and this article), I endeavored to persevere. The starter would just have to deal with my water. Next, the temperature. The King Arthur Flour website advised those living in cooler houses to “try setting the starter atop your water heater, refrigerator or another appliance that might generate ambient heat. Your turned-off oven — with the light turned on — is also a good choice.” It was just too creepy to put the starter on the water heater in my dungeon-like basement, and no way am I leaving my oven light on for a week. We’re also trying to conserve energy , here! So the fridge it was. Unfortunately, the top of my fridge doesn’t seem any warmer than the rest of the house. How to make your own sourdough starter The process for making sourdough starter is quite simple. It is also perfect for sheltering in place, because starter likes a regular schedule. Though I consulted many websites, I decided to go with King Arthur as my guru. It has a five-day program to turn your flour and water into sourdough starter. On day one, you combine one cup of pumpernickel or whole wheat flour with one-half cup water in a non-reactive container with at least one-quart capacity. This means crockery, glass, stainless steel or food-grade plastic. I used a blue plastic mixing bowl. Unfortunately, I only had all-purpose flour, so I used that. This isn’t the time to be running out to the shop for one ingredient, right? You mix your flour and water until you can’t see any flour. Use cool water if your house is warm or warm water if your house is cool. Cover loosely with a kitchen cloth and set the starter somewhere warm. On day two, discard half the starter (or save that for a recipe to reduce food waste). Add a cup of all-purpose flour and one-half cup of water to the remainder. Stir well, re-cover and return the starter to its warm spot. By day three, your starter is supposed to start bubbling and increasing in size. Its appetite soars, and it demands two flour feedings a day, spaced 12 hours apart. Each time you feed, you must reduce the starter to about one-half cup before adding the new flour and water. Sometime after day five, the starter is supposed to be very lively and will have doubled in size. “You’ll see lots of bubbles; there may be some little ‘rivulets’ on the surface, full of finer bubbles. Also, the starter should have a tangy aroma — pleasingly acidic, but not overpowering,” according to King Arthur. Now, your starter is ready to become sourdough bread. You’ll use some in the bread recipe and keep the rest in your fridge, where it needs to be fed once a week and used for future loaves. You might want to name your starter — it could be around for a long time. The famous Boudin Bakery in San Francisco is still using the yeast Isidore Boudin collected in 1849. Hardcore bread lover Seamus Blackley, with the help of an Egyptologist and a microbiologist, managed to collect 4,500-year-old yeast off ancient Egyptian pottery for his loaves. So treat your starter well. Cooking with sourdough starter discard What is the reality of joining this long line of sourdough bakers ? Is it as romantic as it sounds? You might spend a lot of time asking yourself if your sourdough is really bubbling yet, whether it’s supposed to smell this way and what on earth are you going to do with all the discarded starter, especially as you move onto feeding and discarding twice a day. Related: Bakers yeast and sourdough starter — it looks alive to me! The first day, I added some starter discard to a regular cornbread recipe, pretending it was just more flour. It was a little hard to stir in, but for the most part, it worked out okay. My most successful dish was vegan sourdough pancakes, which involved following this recipe from Food52 and stirring in a ripe banana. They tasted more like delicious flat donuts than pancakes. My low point came when I tried to fashion a flatbread out of starter. The stomachache-inducing flatbreads wouldn’t cook all the way through. As I made my fifth attempt, my back aching, smoke alarm screeching and my husband and quarantine-mate sniping at my starter — “That (bleep) is like (bleeping) glue!” — I realized it was not the lifestyle moment those Instagram bakers had promised. The main event: sourdough bread All this feeding the starter eventually leads to making delicious sourdough bread. Theoretically. “When your starter has doubled in size, you see bubbles breaking on the surface, and it feels somewhat elastic to the touch, it’s ready to bake with,” King Arthur explained. But woe to us in cold houses. As I read down to the comments section, another cool-home dweller said his took two weeks to bubble sufficiently! Meanwhile, my starter has eaten nearly all of my flour, so there won’t even be enough to bake a loaf with. At press time, I’m trying to decide between A) trying my luck with my prepubescent starter and remaining flour to make a mini loaf, B) aborting the mission and turning all the starter into pancakes or C) throwing it all in the compost . A more persistent soul could add option D) going to the store and buying more flour to see the process through. Another option? Try making a “mini starter” , which requires much less flour but also takes longer to yield enough discard to make anything. But let’s assume you’re in a warmer house and have a bubbly, delightful starter. Now you’re in for a long process of kneading, folding, autolyzing (letting your dough rest), watching like a hawk for sufficient rising and eventually baking a delicious loaf. Best of luck to you. Here’s the Clever Carrot’s guide to that multistep process. The verdict I was not sufficiently committed to sacrificing all my flour to the voracious starter, nor did I have the right container. I thought all those upright glass vessels that look like vases were just for show on social media. As it turns out, they help you watch the starter. Maybe mine doubled in size and dropped back down when I wasn’t looking. Who knows? It’s in an opaque bowl atop the fridge covered with a tea towel. This experiment will also tell you more about what kind of person you are, if you don’t already know. Good candidates for making starter include people who love being in the kitchen, who take pride in their cooking or who have kids at home that enjoy culinary science experiments. If you cannot commit to your sourdough starter, it could just lead to a lot of food waste . Some of us lack the patience and interest. For the last 15 years, whenever I wanted a quick bread fix, I’ve made baking powder biscuits from a recipe in PETA’s The Compassionate Cook. The whole process takes about 20 minutes. My slightly more ambitious bread-making friend swears by this no-knead bread recipe . These might be better options if you don’t feel confident in working on a sourdough starter. The biggest thing I learned from making my own starter is how lucky I am that Trader Joe’s sells sourdough loaves for $3.99. Even my neighborhood boutique bakery that charges $7 or $8 a loaf seems like a bargain now. If you’re like me, you can consider making sourdough starter an exercise in bread appreciation. Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat, Tommaso Urli , Thomas Bock , Oscar S , Richard Klasovsky

Read the rest here: 
Should you make sourdough starter?

15 ways to celebrate Earth Day 2020 at home

April 22, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on 15 ways to celebrate Earth Day 2020 at home

April 22, 2020 is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day . While every day is the perfect day to honor Mother Earth, Earth Day is an opportunity to implement a new sustainable practice, create something beautiful or protect limited resources. So while you are hunkered down during COVID-19, here are some activities you can do to celebrate Earth Day at home. Establish rain barrels Water conservation is especially important, so why not start in your own yard by collecting rainwater ? In turn, you can use it to water the lawn and garden or provide a drink for pets and wildlife. Systems are easy to set up with a downspout diverter that you can incorporate directly into your gutter system. Related: Earth Day 2020 goes digital Pick up garbage Garbage is not only an eyesore, but it can hurt wildlife and pollute waterways , too. This Earth Day, head out on your own or with your household to pick up the neighborhood on your daily walk or even clean up your own yard. Just be sure to follow health precautions, including social distancing and wearing masks. Make planters For a fun Earth Day project, build your own planters. You can make them out of spare wood or concrete mix, or you can get creative with household items that make excellent planters, such as an old boot, a colander or a teapot. Create flower beds Because Earth Day lands in spring, it’s a great time to plan for planting. If you’re creating flower beds, use repurposed materials instead of buying new. Grab a pallet, upcycle some metal sheeting, stack rocks from around the property or line the space with upside-down bottles. The options for creating flower beds are only limited by your imagination, so get creative! Design an eco-friendly pantry  Earth Day is about giving thought to ways you can reduce consumption and waste and that idea works just as well inside the home as it does outside of it. With that in mind, tackle the pantry by moving food and spices into glass jars. Use a label-maker or attach chalk paint stickers to the front of each jar so you can identify the ingredients. Then, plan to purchase from bulk bins in the future to eliminate packaging waste with each grocery store trip. Plant a tree Few things are more ubiquitous than planting a tree on Earth Day, so join the movement by putting some of your favorites in the yard. Trees offer endless benefits, from providing animal habitats and shade to cleaning the air you breathe. Consider planting a fruit tree , so you can even harvest some sweet rewards. Provide bird feeders and baths Birds are pollinators , plus they are just fun to watch as they fly and sing around the yard. Take care of your feathered friends with clean bird baths and feeders full of fresh seeds for them to enjoy. Build a butterfly house In addition to selecting plants that attract fluttery friends, you can spend your Earth Day building a home specifically made for butterflies . Plans are fairly basic, and if you are inclined, a slight variation in the design can net you a bat house, too. Start an apiary Bees are essential for pollination and a healthy food and flower supply. With that in mind, why not manage your own apiary? There are some upfront costs and planning required, but if beekeeping is on your bucket list, Earth Day is the perfect time to start.  Make your own cleaning products To avoid washing toxic chemicals down the drain and into the water system, make your own natural cleaners. With a little practice, you can make laundry detergent , fabric softener, liquid soap and all-purpose cleaners. Natural cleaners don’t require very many ingredients, and you may already have these ingredients in your home. Spend your Earth Day making the switch from commercial to homemade. Related: DIY natural cleaners for every household chore Replace plastic Eliminating plastic from your house can take your Earth Day campaign from one room to the next. Although you don’t have to hit the internet to order all new containers, make a wish list and replace plastic items as you are able. Common examples include shampoo bottles, water bottles, laundry detergent jugs, grocery bags and food storage containers. Vow to make the switch to no packaging or glass and stainless steel reusable containers for every item on the list. Convert to online billing In today’s world, paper billing is rarely needed. Save mail delivery fuel emissions and reduce paper consumption by moving your bills online instead of receiving them in paper form. This can include mail relating to utilities, banking, credit cards, mortgages and more. Plan or plant a garden Providing fresh, farm-to-table food for your family or roommates is a fabulous way to spend Earth Day. The benefits are endless, from bountiful produce to a smaller carbon footprint. If it’s not quite planting time in your region, at least outline a plan for what plants you hope to grow, where you will locate them and when they will be ready for consumption. Start composting If you don’t have one already, composters are easy to start and maintain. You can buy a commercial composter, put together a basic wood box without a bottom or simply make a pile in the backyard. Position your compost pile in a sunny spot for best results, stir it occasionally and make sure it stays moist during very dry seasons. Layer ingredients with approximately equal amounts of brown materials, green materials and organic food scraps. Watch the Lyrid meteor shower Enjoy an exciting glimpse of our universe by watching the Lyric meteor shower , which is actually visible from about April 16 to April 25, just in time to celebrate Earth Day. You’ll have a chance to see up to 10 to 15 meteors per hour. + EarthDay.org Images via Manfred Antranias Zimmer , Barb Howe , Dieter G , George B2 , Crema Joe and Neon Brand

See more here: 
15 ways to celebrate Earth Day 2020 at home

Sea turtles thrive on empty beaches during COVID-19 lockdowns

April 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sea turtles thrive on empty beaches during COVID-19 lockdowns

As more people around the world stay inside, more animals are able to thrive in places that are typically crowded by humans. In the southeastern U.S., sea turtles are enjoying a peaceful nesting season without pesky sunbathers, fishermen or boats. “It’s going to be a very good year for our leatherbacks,” Sarah Hirsch, senior manager of research and data at Loggerhead Marinelife Center , told WPEC . “We’re excited to see our turtles thrive in this environment. Our world has changed, but these turtles have been doing this for millions of years and it’s just reassuring and gives us hope that the world is still going on.” Loggerhead Marinelife Center’s researchers have located 69 nests on the 9.5 miles of beach they study, which is significantly more than normal. Related: Baby turtles officially return to the beaches of Mumbai after largest beach cleanup in history All seven types of sea turtles are endangered or vulnerable. The odds are stacked against hatchlings; only one in 1,000 live to become adults. While hatchlings elude natural predators, such as dogs, seabirds, raccoons, ghost crabs and fish, turtles of all ages face many threats from humans. These include microplastics, fishing gear, coastal development, boat strikes, global warming and the illegal trade in eggs, meat and shells. David Godfrey, executive director of the Sea Turtle Conservancy , said thousands of turtles are currently migrating to nesting beaches in the sotheastern U.S. and that “all of the potential positive impacts relate to changes in human behavior.” With fewer boats on the water, the number of boat strikes on turtles and other marine animals will also drop. “All of the reduced human presence on the beach also means that there will be less garbage and other plastics entering the marine environment,” Godfrey said. A 2016 University of Florida study concluded that removing trash and debris from beaches can increase the number of turtle nests by 200%. In 2019, Florida reported more than 395,700 sea turtle nests during hatching season. Because many beaches preferred by turtles are also prized by tourists, researchers will watch with concern as parts of Florida begin to open their beaches to humans again. Via CBS News Image via Pixabay

Excerpt from:
Sea turtles thrive on empty beaches during COVID-19 lockdowns

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1808 access attempts in the last 7 days.