UN releases World Water Development Report 2020

March 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Climate change further challenges the world’s overstretched water resources, ultimately threatening all aspects of human life, according to the latest UN World Water Development Report. Most human needs revolve around water, so energy production, industrial development, food security, human and animal health and housing are also vulnerable to climate change impacts. The report states that the reliability of available water will decrease as the climate becomes more variable, amplifying floods, droughts and other water-related problems. Places already stressed from insufficient water sources will suffer more, while places that have so far been unaffected will feel the pain, too. Related: IPCC landmark report warns about the state of the oceans, polar ice content and the climate crisis Over the last century, global water use has increased by a factor of six. Between population increase, economic development and explosive human consumption, this growth continues at about 1% per year. Groundwater depletion doubled from 1960 to 2000. Some experts predict that 40% of the world will face a water deficit by 2030. “If we are serious about limiting global temperature increases to below 2°C and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, we must act immediately,” said Gilbert F. Houngbo, chair of UN Water. “There are solutions for managing water and climate in a more coordinated manner and every sector of society has a role to play. We simply cannot afford to wait.” The UN report acknowledges that while most countries recognize water as a crucial issue, few have specific action plans about adapting policies to protect this resource. The report suggests that climate change funds be used more for adaptation and mitigation of water issues. Adaptation includes social and institutional measures, plus natural, technological and technical steps to lessen climate change-related damage. Mitigation refers to the actions humans must take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Wastewater treatment generates a high amount of emissions. Some countries — such as Peru, Mexico , Thailand and Jordan — have already harnessed the methane in untreated wastewater as biogas, which provides enough energy to run the treatment process. The UN report also mentions wetland protection, conservation agriculture techniques, reusing partially treated wastewater for industry and agriculture and fog capture as possible water management interventions. + UN World Water Development Report 2020 Image via Alex Hu

See the original post:
UN releases World Water Development Report 2020

Infographic: Water & Global Climate Crisis — What Can You Do?

March 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

This year on March 22, World Water Day focuses on … The post Infographic: Water & Global Climate Crisis — What Can You Do? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Infographic: Water & Global Climate Crisis — What Can You Do?

Earth911 Inspiration: What Kind of Difference Will You Make?

March 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Renowned scientist and conservationist Jane Goodall reminds us that we … The post Earth911 Inspiration: What Kind of Difference Will You Make? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Earth911 Inspiration: What Kind of Difference Will You Make?

This DIY off-grid home in Hawaii includes a permaculture farm

March 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This DIY off-grid home in Hawaii includes a permaculture farm

Living an off-grid lifestyle is a dream for many, but it’s also incredibly tough to achieve. Still, there are a select few who manage to do it with such style that it makes the transition from running the endless rat race to sustainable living look relatively easy. Ambitious couple Arina and Zen Moriya have done just that by creating an off-grid oasis within the jungles of Pahoa, Hawaii . The Root Down Farm is a self-built homestead that enables the couple to embrace a close connection with nature. The sustainable permaculture farm and off-grid home are located in a community called Puna. After visiting in 2008, the couple immediately fell in love with the community’s progressive, laid-back style and history of  sustainable living. The region’s mild weather, along with the lush jungle vegetation, led them to purchase a 3-acre lot to begin a new way of life. Related: Serene off-grid tiny home sits tucked away in a Hawaiian rainforest The resulting Root Down Farm includes three structures: the main house, which is 1,272-square-feet, a 384-square-foot cottage and a sweet, 360-square-foot bungalow that the couple rents out on Airbnb. All of the structures are surrounded by an expansive permaculture farm that provides vegetables and fruits for the couple and their friends. Inside each building, the furnishings were chosen to reflect the couple’s minimalist design style . Nearly everything was handmade by Zen or found secondhand. The couple did most of the construction work themselves over the span of 2.5 years, along with help of a professional contractor and a few very good friends. The climate was an essential element in their building strategy, enabling them to rely on a few passive features. “Because we don’t have harsh winter, we were able to build structures with no windows (only screens to keep bugs out) and build with single wall with no insulation,” Zen told Inhabitat. Perhaps the only downside to building in a remote area on a tropical island is the fact that they weren’t able to find many repurposed materials to use for the structures. Instead, they turned to nature. “Reclaimed building materials are not easy to find on this island. There is only one or two vendors who salvage old building materials on this island but they charge premium,” Zen explained. “We did try to use as much natural material as possible, such as ohia tree for the main post in the house, guava trees for railing and fence.” Root Down Farm operates completely off of the grid thanks to solar power generation . There is no access to electricity, water or sewers in the area, so the couple built their own self-sufficient systems. They use multiple wells for their water needs and all of the structures are equipped with composting toilets. The permaculture gardens that surround the properties were a crucial component of the project. Arina and Zen now enjoy an abundance of organic food year-round, including coconuts, avocados, banana, papayas, root vegetables, tomatoes and more, all of which they also share with friends. + Root Down Farm Via Apartment Therapy Images by Zen Moriya

Original post:
This DIY off-grid home in Hawaii includes a permaculture farm

These gorgeous designs guard against flooding

March 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on These gorgeous designs guard against flooding

Letting the water in poses no threat to these communities in these ingenious designs.

More here:
These gorgeous designs guard against flooding

Sound investments to decarbonize the world’s industries

March 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Sound investments to decarbonize the world’s industries

As much as $21 trillion is needed through 2050 to fully decarbonize the ammonia, cement, ethylene and steel sectors.

View original here:
Sound investments to decarbonize the world’s industries

Will Mexico City’s massive new park be a climate adaptation paragon for other cities?

March 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Will Mexico City’s massive new park be a climate adaptation paragon for other cities?

An architect and officials are hoping that a huge park in Mexico City can restore the water systems of the region and serve as a model for others around the world.

Read more here:
Will Mexico City’s massive new park be a climate adaptation paragon for other cities?

Ecolab’s Emilio Tenuta on the nexus of water, circularity and sustainability

February 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ecolab’s Emilio Tenuta on the nexus of water, circularity and sustainability

Emilio Tenuta, chief sustainability officer at Ecolab, says that water is often treated in a linear way and as a liability, rather than as the renewable resource that it is. Tenuta notes that we have to go beyond conservation to stave off the water shortage that is anticipated in 2030.

View post:
Ecolab’s Emilio Tenuta on the nexus of water, circularity and sustainability

This company is turning food waste into a cleaning spray

February 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on This company is turning food waste into a cleaning spray

97 percent of the cleaning product is made from the water, acids and alcohol from the food waste.

See more here:
This company is turning food waste into a cleaning spray

Water Street Tampa hits major sustainability milestone

February 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Water Street Tampa hits major sustainability milestone

Back in June 2019, Inhabitat did a story about Florida’s Water Street Tampa and its goal to become the  world’s healthiest neighborhood . Fast forward to January 2020, and the ambitious 56-acre neighborhood in the heart of Downtown Tampa is making headlines again with its new cooling plant, one of the first buildings to open. The District Cooling Plant will produce and distribute cold water to provide sustainable air conditioning to most of the buildings that make up Water Street Tampa .  Tampa Mayor Jane Castor attended the new plant’s ribbon-cutting ceremony and said, “As our city continues to grow, we have to make sure we’re doing so in a thoughtful way. This district cooling facility will play a big role in reducing our energy consumption while we work to create a more sustainable and resilient city. This is a big step forward in the right direction as we continue transforming Tampa together.” The project was designed by Florida-based architect Baker Barrios and spans 12,500-square feet of space constructed and installed by Tampa Bay Trane. It was built using 8,500 linear feet of insulated underground steel piping infrastructure and will concentrate noise pollution into a single building rather than separate individual buildings while it cools. Even better, the system is 30 to 40 percent more efficient than most traditional air conditioning systems while consuming less energy. The way that the plant is set up also frees up rooftop space that would normally be dedicated to housing individual air conditioners, making the neighborhood roofs available for use as shared amenity spaces for the residents. The concrete masonry design combined with structural steel and brick pattern is a nod towards the historic cigar factories in Ybor City, a nearby iconic district northeast of Tampa’s downtown. + Water Street Tampa Photography by Nicole Abbott

View post:
Water Street Tampa hits major sustainability milestone

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2551 access attempts in the last 7 days.