Earthy modular VIMOB home can be erected in even the most hard-to-reach locations

November 27, 2015 by  
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Earthy modular VIMOB home can be erected in even the most hard-to-reach locations

Ten solutions to California’s drought

June 17, 2015 by  
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As California enters the fourth year of the worst drought in the state’s history, NASA estimates that 11 trillion gallons of water will be needed to recover from this arid rut. While Governor Jerry Brown has implemented a series of wide-ranging measures aimed at curbing water usage , there are efforts underway to engineer the state out of its drought. Some are fairly well-tested— desalination, for example —while others, such as William Shatner’s proposed $30 billion Seattle-Lake Mead pipeline , seem straight-up wacky. Read on to learn more about the good, the bad and the weird big-picture ideas for addressing California’s drought . Read the rest of Ten solutions to California’s drought Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: andes water , aqua science , aquifer , Aquifers and Wells , atmospheric water generation , bernard vonnegut , Bottled Water , california agriculture , california drought , carlsbad , chile fog , Climate Change , cloud-seeding , desalination plant , dew harvest , diagram of groundwater , drought solutions , fog catcher , fog collector , geoengineering , geoengineering drought , groundwater , groundwater solutions , hoover dam , how to fix the drought , how to solve california’s drought , how to solve the drought , humidity harvesting , ionization rain , jerry brown , lake mead , nestle california , nevada reservoir , pipelines , rain on request , san bernadino , san diego , San Francisco , Self Filling Water Bottle , silver iodide , solar desalination , Solutions for the CA drought , solutions to California’s drought , Wally Hickel , waste water , wastewater california , wastewater reuse , wastewater reycling , water treatment , WaterFX , weather manipulation , wells , william shatner

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Ten solutions to California’s drought

GREEN BUILDING 101: Water Efficiency, Both Inside and Outside the Home

May 16, 2014 by  
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There are few things we take for granted as much as our ability to turn on the tap and get water in a seemingly endless supply. Even during droughts, and despite warnings about shortages and conservation, most of us treat this precious resource as a given. The average American uses 80-100 gallons of water per day, and while less than half of that will be used for cooking or drinking, chances are that all of it is treated, potable water from the municipal provider. What many people don’t realize is that it’s fairly easy to implement systems for recycling and reusing water on your own property, thereby decreasing the demands on shared supplies, and reducing your water bills. Read on for details on the three LEED-H criteria for water efficiency at home, plus additional info on wastewater treatment and reuse. Read the rest of GREEN BUILDING 101: Water Efficiency, Both Inside and Outside the Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “water collection” , catchment , cisterns , Design , ecology , Environment , garden , Green Building 101 , green roof , green roofs , home , irrigation , landscape , plants , rain catchment , rainfall , rainwater , rainwater catchment , runoff , shower head , showerhead , showerheads , showers , sprinkler , water conservation , water efficiency , water issues , water treatment , water-wise

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GREEN BUILDING 101: Water Efficiency, Both Inside and Outside the Home

3D-Printed Canal House Pops Up in Amsterdam, May Start New Housing Trend

May 16, 2014 by  
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When DUS Architects announced plans last year to 3D print an entire canal house , the design world was skeptical. But all skepticism vanished recently when they unveiled the first 3D-printed walls to the public in Amsterdam. During the unveiling, the firm showcased a set of 3D printed plastic pieces that will lock together to build the canal home’s façade. In addition to demonstrating the possibilities of 3D printing with different materials, the project provides a tangible example of the next-generation technology that may well spur a whole new housing trend. Read the rest of 3D-Printed Canal House Pops Up in Amsterdam, May Start New Housing Trend Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d Printed canal house , Canal House , dus architects , DUS Architects Canal House , eco design , first 3d-printed house , giant 3d printer , green design , KamerMaker , room builder printer , sustainable design

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3D-Printed Canal House Pops Up in Amsterdam, May Start New Housing Trend

Bio-artist Joe Davis to Build a Genetically Modified ‘Tree of Knowledge’ With Wikipedia Pages

May 16, 2014 by  
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Bio-artist Joe Davis plans to place 50,000 of the most popular Wikipedia pages into the DNA of apple trees to create a genetically modified Tree of Knowledge. Called Malus ecclesia , the project is part of Davis’ art residency at the genetics lab run by George Church at Harvard Medical School. Read the rest of Bio-artist Joe Davis to Build a Genetically Modified ‘Tree of Knowledge’ With Wikipedia Pages Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apples , Art , bio-artist , DNA , Forbidden fruit , genetic modification , genetically modified food , genetics , harvard medical school , Joe Davis , Malus ecclesia , Tree of Knowledge , wikipedia

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Bio-artist Joe Davis to Build a Genetically Modified ‘Tree of Knowledge’ With Wikipedia Pages

Urban Algae Farms Could Heat Buildings While Treating Wastewater

March 21, 2012 by  
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Macro of Ulva Algae photo from Shutterstock Pardon the potty talk, but wouldn’t it be great if every time you flushed the toilet you were actually generating heat for your home? That’s exactly what a Los Angeles-based startup is hoping to accomplish . OriginOil , a company that specializes in converting algae into fuel, is working on developing a pilot for an urban algae farm concept that would use wastewater to help grow algae, which is then used to generate energy, treating the wastewater in the process. Read the rest of Urban Algae Farms Could Heat Buildings While Treating Wastewater Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , algae , alternative energy , clean tech , france , net-zero buildings , net-zero energy , OriginOil , Paris , renewable energy , sewage treatment , wastewater , water treatment

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Urban Algae Farms Could Heat Buildings While Treating Wastewater

greenfab – posted

March 6, 2012 by  
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Washington’s First LEED Platinum Prefabricated, Modular Home Today, Greenfab was awarded LEED Platinum certification by USGBC for achievement in green homebuilding and design. Greenfab’s prefabricated, modular home is the first to be certified LEED Platinum in the State of Washington. The home is part of Greenfab’s 1300 Series now available nationwide at www.greenfab.com. Greenfab homes are not only healthier and stronger but are also completed 50% faster than traditional homes built on-site. Located in Seattle, the 1,870 square foot Greenfab home consists of three bedrooms and focuses heavily on reducing energy use by incorporating double-glazed windows with a U-value of .35, R-26 exterior walls, which are 35 percent better than code (R-17), Energy Star rated appliances, energy recovery ventilation, heat pump electric heating, backup radiant electric heat, and a GE hybrid heat pump water heater. A digital monitoring system collects and measures realtime data about weather, energy and water use, and provides constant feedback to troubleshoot and monitor performance through an interactive iPad/iPhone based application. Necessary wiring for solar panels in the roof has also been installed and approved for future use. Water conservation strategies include a series of three, 300 gallon storage basins that filter and treat grey water from showers, bathroom sinks and the washing machine. A rain garden infiltrates overflow from the grey water treatment system to recharge ground water. A 1,400 gallon above ground water storage cistern captures rainwater for on-site irrigation and toilet flushing. Low-flow plumbing fixtures and dual- flush toilets contribute to a significant reduction in water usage. Clean indoor air circulates throughout because all of materials used to construct the home were stored and assembled in a controlled factory environment, meaning that there is no risk of mold or mildew, which can happen during traditional construction when building materials are stored outdoors and susceptible to rain and damp weather. The indoor setting also prevents dust and dirt from contaminating ductwork, which can cause long-term adverse indoor air quality problems. All materials, including paints, finishes and adhesives are low or no VOC (volatile organic compounds), and formaldehyde-free. Greenfab sells green, prefabricated, modular homes at an affordable starting price with a personalized, turn-key service that takes the headache out of building a new home. Greenfab realizes that many families have needs that are in conflict with limited budgets, health problems and environmental concerns and exists today to provide a solution to these problems. Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags:

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Saving Land with Floating Solar Panels

November 7, 2011 by  
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A water treatment plant in New Jersy has gone solar with an unusual floating aray of solar panels. Because the water treatment facility is located on a protected site there was very little land available for construction. Floating the solar panels on the reservoir was the best way to add solar power to the facility. According to New Jersey American Water, the installation at the Canoe Brook Water Treatment Plant is the first solar array on a body of water designed to withstand a freeze/thaw environment. The installation comprises 538 modules on a floating structure that is designed to rise and fall with the water levels in the reservoir. The panels are expected to provide about 2 percent of the plant’s energy needs, resulting in about $16,000 in energy cost savings annually. The company press release notes that this is part of a $1.35 million dollar pilot project undertaken by the utility. That may not be cost effective even in the lifetime of the solar panels. But perhaps the infrastructure investment will help pay off in other long-term benefits. image: New Jersey American Water (Facebook) via: Solar Thermal Magazine

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Saving Land with Floating Solar Panels

Poop-Fueled Batteries May Be Available for Home Use in 5 Years

August 23, 2011 by  
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Raw sewage stinks, but did you know it is actually a hot commodity? Gaseous wastewater has the potential to be converted into energy-packed biofuel, powering city facilities worldwide. Soon, that noxious wastewater you’ve held your breath over could help power your home appliances through microbial fuel cell batteries! Read the rest of Poop-Fueled Batteries May Be Available for Home Use in 5 Years Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bioegas fuel cell , bioenergy , biofuel , Bruce Logan , raw sewage , renewable energy , wastewater treatment

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Poop-Fueled Batteries May Be Available for Home Use in 5 Years

Water Utility to Save $200K per Year by Turning Human Waste to Energy

October 20, 2010 by  
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The first biogas plant in the United States to be powered by human sewage is up and running today, and will save the city of San Antonio $200,000 a year in water treatment and energy costs.

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Water Utility to Save $200K per Year by Turning Human Waste to Energy

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