Whiskey spill in Kentucky kills thousands of fish

July 10, 2019 by  
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Two Jim Beam warehouses in Kentucky erupted in flames last week, spilling nearly 45,000 barrels of bourbon into the Kentucky River. In an apocalyptic scene, the fire spread to the alcohol on the river’s surface, consuming all available oxygen within the water. The fire, alcohol content and lack of oxygen resulted in the death of thousands of fish . But this isn’t Kentucky’s first rodeo. In fact, the state has had so many whiskey spills that it has specific protocols for this type of disaster . The Louisville Water Company issued a swift announcement letting the public know that the water is not a health concern for humans. Related: Two thirds of world’s rivers are contaminated with drugs “We’ve had several occur in this state, so when this one occurred, we were just ready for it and knew what the actions were to take,” said Robert Francis, the manager of Kentucky’s emergency response team. When the Jim Beam warehouse was struck by lightning in 2003, 800,000 gallons of bourbon spilled out into the a creek in Bardstown. Just last year, the Jim Beam warehouse went up in flames again and spilled 9,000 barrels. In 2000, Wild Turkey spilled 17,000 gallons of bourbon in Frankfort, Kentucky and killed about 228,000 fish . In 1996, the Heaven Hill distillery spilled 90,000 barrels of bourbon after a warehouse fire. Firefighters from four counties rushed to the scene to extinguish this year’s bourbon warehouse blaze, and emergency teams continue to monitor the river to assess the impact. The Kentucky River is approximately 24 miles long and moving at a speed of less than a mile per hour. The alcohol is expected to have reached the Ohio River and be diluted enough to cause no further threat. Wildlife crews also helped aerate the river water via barges, which helps to replenish the oxygen and prevent further fish kills. The emergency responders will leave the dead fish floating in the river to decompose naturally, as they pose no threat to humans or other wildlife . Via The BBC and The Courier-Journal Image via Bruno Glätsch

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Whiskey spill in Kentucky kills thousands of fish

Mining in Tasmania raises water pollution concerns to a new high

February 14, 2019 by  
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Tasmania’s water pollution is becoming a major problem for local residents and wildlife. A new study discovered that metal contamination in the state’s lakes are about as high as they get, raising concerns about the quality of water and food obtained from the region. The majority of the contamination can be traced to historic mining operations in Rosebery and Queenstown. The new study, which was conducted by the Australian National University, looked at six lakes in Tasmania, including Perched Lake, Lake Cygnus, Lake Dobson and Dove Lake, and found levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium and copper. Basin Lake and Owen Tarn had the highest levels of water pollution. The levels of contamination are bad enough to equal some of the highest contaminated waterways in the world, including Iran’s Shur River and Pakistan’s Kurang River. “The levels of contamination are really, really high,” the lead scientist on the study, Larissa Schneider. “They need to do research to know what is happening to the fish and if it’s really high… people should not be eating it.” Schneider compared the level of water pollution to what the United States has encountered in some areas of the country. In those cases, local fish populations were severely harmed by the pollutants, which is a major concern because the contamination levels in Tasmania are much higher. Related: California teen finds golf balls are a major source of plastic waste in our oceans Scientists, for example, discovered an alarming amount of lead contamination in Dove Lake, which could affect native organisms. The new research argues that the contaminates were spread via atmospheric transport. Mining operations in the 1930s used open cut mining, a popular practice until it was outlawed by the Environmental Protection Act in the 1970s. Metal contaminates were discovered over 80 miles away from old mining locations, and some of the lakes are in mountainous regions. This suggests that they reached these bodies of water by passing through the air. Will Hodgman, the premier of Tasmania, discussed the new findings and suggested a form of remediation on the part of government and private industries. The entity that looks after waterways, the Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment , has not commented on Tasmania’s water pollution levels. Via The Guardian Image via Wikipedia Commons  

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Mining in Tasmania raises water pollution concerns to a new high

Bee-killing pesticides have been found in US drinking water

April 7, 2017 by  
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We’ve known that neonicotinoid insecticides are bad news for bee populations for several years now, but one thing we don’t know about these pesticides is how they impact human health. A new study from the US Geological Survey and the University of Iowa reveals how terrifying that question could be, revealing minute traces of neonicotinoid chemicals are present in at least some drinking water in the US. In the study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters , researchers took samples from two water treatment plants in Iowa. Though many might assume waste treatment plants would be able to remove pesticides from drinking water, trace amounts of the neonicotinoids were still present after passing the water through the facilities’ carbon filtration systems. Granted, the amounts present ranged from 0.24 to 57.3 nanograms per liter, which Gizmodo describes as “like a single drop of water plopped into 20 Olympic-size swimming pools.” The amount is obviously incredibly small, but unfortunately scientists have no idea whether the residue that remains in drinking water could potentially impact human health. The Environmental Protection Agency has set no regulatory limits on the use of these substances, saying that previous studies have shown they have only low rates of adverse health effects for humans. There’s a catch, though – those older studies only looked at brief exposure to high concentrations of neonicotinoids. It’s still unknown whether low-level chronic exposure could result in long-term health problems. Related: Over 700 North American bee species are heading towards extinction Ideally, more research would be done to learn more about the effect these chemicals have on human health. But with Donald Trump and his cabinet attempting to loosen regulations on industries that pollute the environment and hobbling critical environmental research, it may be a few years before we know for certain whether low levels of neonicotinoids are harmful or not. Via Gizmodo Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

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Bee-killing pesticides have been found in US drinking water

The Everglades were fracked and you didn’t even hear about it

January 7, 2015 by  
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Earlier in 2014, Texas-based Dan A. Hughes Co. was fined $25,000 for acid fracking near the everglades. Though the method of using hydrofluoric acid to loosen limestone bedrock has been used for a while in Floridian oil drilling operations, injecting acid under pressure, or “acid fracking” is something new. In December, Dan A. Hughes Co. tested those waters Naples, Florida on the Western edge of the Everglades. Yeah, you read that correctly—they fracked the goddamned  Everglades National Park;  the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States. And when State regulators asked them to stop? They ignored them. Read the rest of The Everglades were fracked and you didn’t even hear about it Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: acid fracking , acid-fracked , ban fracking , capitalism , climate , Climate Change , Climate Disaster , conservatives , Environment , everglades , florida , fossil fuels , fracking , gas , groundwater , hydraulic fracturing , keystone xl , KXL , marco island , Naples , natural gas , oil , Op Ed , politics , renewables , republicans , revolution , shalefields , water contamination , water issues

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The Everglades were fracked and you didn’t even hear about it

Benton Farmer Near Proposed Path of Atlantic Sunrise Gas Pipeline Speaks Out

June 20, 2014 by  
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  I spent some time at Endless Mountains Farm in Benton, PA, operated in part by several members of Shalefield Organizing Committee (SOC), a group of dedicated activists created to put more focus on resources in local areas that don’t normally get funded by NGOs. While there, I sat down to interview Zora; a member of SOC who has serious concerns about the proposed  gas pipeline that may be installed near the farm where she lives and works. Read the rest of Benton Farmer Near Proposed Path of Atlantic Sunrise Gas Pipeline Speaks Out Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable agriculture” , activism , agriculture , animal rights , apathy , Atlantic Sunrise , big greens , collaboration , community , compressor station , destruction , dirty energy , drilling , earth , economic benefits , economy , Endless Mountains , Endless Mountains Farm , Environment , environmental activism , environmental movement , environmental problems , environmentalists , farm , farming , Food & Water Watch , fossil fuels , frack , fracked , fracking , Future , future generations , gas industry , government , grassroots , green energy , hydrofracking , industry , lobbying , NGO , PA , pennsylvania , pipelines , politics , propaganda , rural , shale gas , shale gas extraction , Shalefield Organizing Committee , small-town , SOC , soil , Sustainable , toxic , water contamination , water issues , Williams , Zora , Zora Acephala

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Benton Farmer Near Proposed Path of Atlantic Sunrise Gas Pipeline Speaks Out

Silos Topped With Stacks of Shipping Containers Provide Cheap Student Housing in South Africa

June 20, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Silos Topped With Stacks of Shipping Containers Provide Cheap Student Housing in South Africa Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Architecture , Citiq Developments , johannesburg architecture , johannesburg student housing , Mill Junction Housing , repurposed materials , repurposed shipping containers , shipping container buildings in Africa , shipping container housing , student housing design , student housing johannesburg , Urban design

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Silos Topped With Stacks of Shipping Containers Provide Cheap Student Housing in South Africa

Benton Farmer Near Proposed Path of Atlantic Sunrise Oil Pipeline Speaks Out

June 19, 2014 by  
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  I spent some time at Endless Mountains Farm in Benton, PA, operated in part by several members of Shalefield Organizing Committee (SOC), a group of dedicated activists created to put more focus on resources in local areas that don’t normally get funded by NGOs. While there, I sat down to interview Zora; a member of SOC who has serious concerns about the proposed  gas pipeline that may be installed near the farm where she lives and works. Read the rest of Benton Farmer Near Proposed Path of Atlantic Sunrise Oil Pipeline Speaks Out Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable agriculture” , activism , agriculture , animal rights , apathy , Atlantic Sunrise , big greens , collaboration , community , compressor station , destruction , dirty energy , drilling , earth , economic benefits , economy , Endless Mountains , Endless Mountains Farm , Environment , environmental activism , environmental movement , environmental problems , environmentalists , farm , farming , Food & Water Watch , fossil fuels , frack , fracked , fracking , Future , future generations , gas industry , government , grassroots , green energy , hydrofracking , industry , lobbying , NGO , PA , pennsylvania , pipelines , politics , propaganda , rural , shale gas , shale gas extraction , Shalefield Organizing Committee , small-town , SOC , soil , Sustainable , toxic , water contamination , water issues , Williams , Zora , Zora Acephala

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Benton Farmer Near Proposed Path of Atlantic Sunrise Oil Pipeline Speaks Out

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