Bloombergs new London HQ rated worlds most sustainable office

October 3, 2017 by  
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Bloomberg’s new European headquarters in London scored a 98.5% against the latest BREEAM sustainability rating scheme—making it the world’s most sustainable office building, as designed. Certified BREEAM Outstanding with its design-stage score, the Foster + Partners -designed project uses 73% less water and 35% less energy than a typical office building. Innovative energy saving technologies are visibly integrated into the building, from the beautiful and multifunctional petal-leaf ceiling panels to the façade’s bronze solar shading fins. From design development to construction, sustainability played a key role in the Bloomberg European HQ project. A 95% recycling rate of demolition and construction waste was achieved during the six-year construction process thanks to the reuse of existing structural foundations and a unique waste management system that tracked waste production. The new London building is one of Bloomberg’s 34 LEED or BREEAM -certified projects globally. The most eye-catching energy-saving feature of the new office headquarters is the approximately 4,000 integrated ceiling panels that combine heating, cooling, lighting, and acoustic functions. Half a million LED lights are embedded into the bespoke ceiling panels and use 40% less energy than a typical fluorescent office lighting system. The ceiling panels’ metal petals also use elevated chilled water temperatures to reduce energy use in a first-of-its-kind integrated cooling system. Related: Peek inside Bloomberg’s sustainable new headquarters in London An on-site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) generation center supplies heat and power in a single, efficient system that’s estimated to save 500 to 700 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide annually. Rooftop solar also provides additional power. To cool the building naturally, the facade is equipped with 117 operable large bronze fins that open and close for natural ventilation. Smart sensing controls automatically adjust airflow depending on occupancy. Rainwater from the roof, cooling tower blow-off water, and gray water are captured, treated, and recycled to flush toilets. + Foster + Partners Images via Foster + Partners

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Bloombergs new London HQ rated worlds most sustainable office

A cresting wave for circular water strategy

August 23, 2017 by  
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More and more, it’s a matter of social equity.

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A cresting wave for circular water strategy

Reducing food waste is IKEA’s ‘triple win’

August 23, 2017 by  
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Wasting less means feeding more, alleviating environmental pressure and boosting the economy.

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Reducing food waste is IKEA’s ‘triple win’

Beermaker Carlsberg zeroes in on zero

August 22, 2017 by  
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The global beer giant embraces ambitious new emissions, water conservation, and social goals.

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Beermaker Carlsberg zeroes in on zero

Inside California’s clean-economy leadership — for now

August 22, 2017 by  
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Amid a worrisome increase in transportation emissions, is it time for “climate policies 2.0”?

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Inside California’s clean-economy leadership — for now

One of Africa’s biggest cities could run out of water by September

July 25, 2017 by  
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Kenya’s capital city, Nairboi , is dangerously low on water . The city, home to around 3.4 million people, has been rationing water since January 1, but it may not be enough. 60 percent of residents already don’t have reliable water – and the city could run dry by September. Nairobi’s water issues stem back in part to two low rainy seasons. The October to December 2016 rains amounted to only 10.5 inches of water, compared with the 27.5 inches or so expected. The March to May 2017 rains were late, arriving at last in May, but only poured down around 17.3 inches when around 39 inches were expected. Related: 70% of Bolivian residents lack sufficient water amid worst drought in 25 years “Nairobi used to be a swamp but is no longer behaving like one. Our underground rivers have dried up,” engineer Lucy Njambi Macharia of the Nairobi City Water and Sewerage Company said. The city’s water company now distributes just around 105,668,821 gallons of water a day – when the city needs around 92,460,218 gallons more than that. Experts aren’t without ideas on how to solve the problem. Rainwater harvesting on buildings, “deliberate efforts to cause groundwater recharge,” and pumping treated wastewater back into the ground are among potential solutions. But experts say the most crucial solution is to care for the land. Soil and water conservation from farmers are pieces of the puzzle – and the city could provide incentives so farmers work against erosion . There are already organizations tackling the dilemma. Nairobi Water Fund’s water fund manager Fred Kihara told The Guardian, “Working with 15,000 farmers, we’ve increased water to Nairobi by 27,000 cubic meters a day. Most is terracing, sediment trapping, 200,000 trees a season. The deal is you can keep the soil on your land with this good quality Napier grass that we supply you.” Deputy director general of the World Agroforestry Center Ravi Prabhu seems hopeful. He told The Guardian, “There is growing political will, and investments have started to flow. What is required is social capital from watershed to water user, and this situation could be turned around.” Meanwhile, the Vatican today shut down 100 historic water foundations in solidarity with Rome, according to The Guardian , which also faces crippling water shortages. Rationing in Italy’s capital has left many residents without water for up to eight hours a day. It’s a growing trend that affects all of us – we must be proactive. Via The Guardian Images via Pixabay and Wikimedia Commons

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One of Africa’s biggest cities could run out of water by September

Beverage giant Carlsberg brews up new science-based targets

June 16, 2017 by  
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The company hopes to reduce the full lifecycle carbon footprint of its products by 30 percent by 2030, compared with a 2015 baseline.

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Beverage giant Carlsberg brews up new science-based targets

Radio Flyer and measuring to manage safer materials

June 16, 2017 by  
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When it comes to tackling chemicals of concerns, the toy manufacturer has prioritized precise metrics and supplier engagement.

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Radio Flyer and measuring to manage safer materials

Cities can jumpstart climate progress by plugging in vehicles

June 16, 2017 by  
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A look at the myriad ways municipalities can make a dent in emissions by rethinking transportation.

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Cities can jumpstart climate progress by plugging in vehicles

Reconsidering the sustainability of hydropower

June 15, 2017 by  
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A new framework makes it more straightforward to evaluate projects against more than 20 social, environmental, technical and economic factors.

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Reconsidering the sustainability of hydropower

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