Cove launches the first 100% biodegradable water bottle

March 7, 2019 by  
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Officially launched in California on Feb. 28, 2019 and targeted to expand to new markets throughout the year, the Cove brand’s 100 percent biodegradable water bottles have become available as a sustainable plastic alternative. Cove offers an eco-friendly solution for water on the go at every phase of production and regardless of the disposal technique used. Single-use plastic water bottles have made the headlines in every fight for sustainability over the years for good reason — they are toxic for the environment. With the amount of plastic in the oceans as well as little hope of any plastic ever truly disappearing, it’s no wonder companies are looking for better ways to package our must-have water. While some companies have invested in plastic alternatives already, they each include metal, plastic or glass that needs to be separated out at the recycling stage. In contrast, the Cove water bottle sidesteps the recycling process altogether. Related: Everlane introduces long-lasting outerwear made from recycled water bottles Although it looks, feels and functions like regular plastic, the Cove water bottle is made from naturally occurring biopolymers called PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) that are biodegradable and compostable. These bottles break down into carbon dioxide, water and organic waste after being tossed into the compost or hauled to the landfill. They will even break down in the soil or the ocean with zero toxic byproducts. Construction of this innovative water bottle begins with a paper core. Attached to that is the PHA formed cylinder, cap and top dome. While the bottle might not last forever like its plastic counterparts, it is shelf-stable for six months. During that period, the bottle can also be reused . Currently, the Cove bottles are filled with natural spring water sourced from Palomar Mountain, California, for the initial launch. However, founder Alex Totterman believes that businesses have an environmental responsibility, so rather than shipping water across long distances, the company vows to source locally in each region as sales and availability spread across different markets. The idea behind the Cove water bottle is simple — produce an earth-friendly alternative to single-use plastic while keeping it convenient to the consumer. As we all know, people find it much easier to participate if the process is easy, and there is nothing easier than grabbing a bottle made from PHA instead of petroleum-based plastic. + Cove Via Packaging 360 Photography by Ryan Lowry and Sergiy Barchuk via Cove

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Cove launches the first 100% biodegradable water bottle

8 Ways to Green Your Water

August 16, 2018 by  
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You H2O it to yourself to read this – get it? The post 8 Ways to Green Your Water appeared first on Earth911.com.

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8 Ways to Green Your Water

Edible Water Blobs: All You Ever Wanted to Know

May 9, 2017 by  
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Despite serious efforts by environmentalists to promote the use of alternatives, consumers have been reluctant to give up single-use plastic water bottles. In the U.S. alone, 38 billion water bottles end up in landfills or the ocean per year. Not…

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Edible Water Blobs: All You Ever Wanted to Know

Why Unilever Has Committed to 100% Recyclable Packaging

April 13, 2017 by  
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Large brands often bear the brunt of the blame for plastic waste and pollution, and rightly so. Look at any news story about plastic pollution and you can see their handiwork — single-use plastic water bottles littering roadsides, grocery store…

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Why Unilever Has Committed to 100% Recyclable Packaging

How marketing can boost reusable bottle use

June 24, 2016 by  
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If we want to promote reusable water bottles as a more sustainable option to bottled water, marketing has to be our primary focus.

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How marketing can boost reusable bottle use

How Patagonia Is Recycling Bottles Into Jackets

March 4, 2016 by  
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Did you know that Americans use 50 billion plastic water bottles each year, with a recycling rate of only 23%? From an environmental standpoint, it brings up numerous concerns. Kicking our bottled water habit can conserve resources, but what are we…

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How Patagonia Is Recycling Bottles Into Jackets

New study shows BPA-free plastics may not be safer

February 4, 2016 by  
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Many plastic products now tout that they are “ BPA-free, ” meaning that they are no longer comprised of the endocrine-disrupting industrial chemical that has been implicated in brain, behavior, and prostate-gland problems in fetuses, infants, and children. Going BPA-free has been a mandate from many consumers for years now, and while it’s good to see alternatives to BPA plastics available , it turns out that the alternatives may be just as bad — or worse — than the BPA itself. Read the rest of New study shows BPA-free plastics may not be safer

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New study shows BPA-free plastics may not be safer

Kickstarter Project Turns Soda Bottles, Shipping Pallets into Roofing

November 2, 2012 by  
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You’ve heard that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, but what if one man’s trash could be another’s shelter? That’s the idea behind SodaBIB, or Soda Bottle Interface Bracket, a project prototype that would turn plastic water bottles into a…

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Kickstarter Project Turns Soda Bottles, Shipping Pallets into Roofing

MiiR Bottles Helps To Provide Clean Drinking Water To Those in Need

October 31, 2012 by  
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Clean water is a humanitarian issue that doesn’t just require design in the form of wells and water systems – but design thinking. The 1 billion people who don’t have access to safe water need the kind of problem-solving that underlies human-centered design – ideas that create sustainable solutions and don’t, for example, just build wells without training people how to fix them if they break.  MiiR is a company that embodies this vision, by designing water bottles that not only give purchasers BPA-free , anti-bacterial bottles to drink water from, but the company also gives $1 to give one person safe water for one year by funding water projects. Read the rest of MiiR Bottles Helps To Provide Clean Drinking Water To Those in Need Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bpa-free water bottles , Charity Water , clean water , drinking water , green water bottles , MiiR , One Day’s Wages , reusable water bottles , water bottles

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MiiR Bottles Helps To Provide Clean Drinking Water To Those in Need

North Face Steps Up To Responsibly Manage an Invisible Waste Stream

July 14, 2011 by  
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Photo credit: Jason Cartwright / Creative Commons If you’re like a lot of people these days, you know that avoiding plastic use is a good idea. You ditch the single serving water bottles for a good steel one. You choose paper rather than plastic. But did you know that many of your clothing purchases, use plastic that you never see – Even from the greenest of companies, like The Nort… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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North Face Steps Up To Responsibly Manage an Invisible Waste Stream

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