Water bear brought back to life after being frozen for 30 years

January 20, 2016 by  
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Much like the concept of Futurama, nature has produced a creature hardy enough to survive being completely frozen for decades. Japanese scientists successfully revived tiny tardigrades – or “water bears”, their common name due to the shape of their heads – after they had been frozen for 30 years . Known as some of the most resilient living things on the planet, the water bears even lived long enough to reproduce. Read the rest of Water bear brought back to life after being frozen for 30 years

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Water bear brought back to life after being frozen for 30 years

Microscopic “water bears” led researchers to discover a new type of glass

September 4, 2015 by  
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Glass seems pretty perfect the way it is, but researchers are constantly looking for ways to make it better. University of Chicago researchers stumbled on a new type of glass while studying tiny, sturdy little creatures called water bears or tardigrades . The microscopic animals produce a strange protective glass coating unlike any researchers have seen before, and it may have human applications that lead to more efficient lighting and solar power technology. Read the rest of Microscopic “water bears” led researchers to discover a new type of glass

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Microscopic “water bears” led researchers to discover a new type of glass

Dutch architect envisions self-sufficient desert cities constructed from salt

September 4, 2015 by  
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A brilliant new building material designed by a recent architecture graduate of TU Delft could solve several pressing environmental challenges at once. Taking what he calls the ‘biomimetic’ approach, Eric Geboers relies on solar energy to separate the salt from water in seawater. The resulting salt is then mixed with a starch derived from algae in seawater to create bricks that have greater compressive strength than earth, and could be used to construct aesthetically-pleasing buildings in arid regions. The desalinated water, meanwhile, would be used to grow food. Read the rest of Dutch architect envisions self-sufficient desert cities constructed from salt

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Dutch architect envisions self-sufficient desert cities constructed from salt

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