Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic

December 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic

A new Arctic Report Card from the U.S. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has revealed that the wild reindeer and caribou populations have plummeted by more than half over the last two decades. According to the report, the impact of climate change in the Arctic has resulted in the reindeer population falling from 5 million to 2.1 million. The report found that the weather patterns and vegetation changes in the Arctic tundra have had a major negative impact on the reindeer, and the wild herds in northern Canada and Alaska have been hit the worst, with some of the herds shrinking by more than 90 percent. Related: Norway rejects wind farm in favor of wild reindeer “We see increased drought in some areas due to climate warming , and the warming itself leads to a change of vegetation,” said professor Howard Epstein, an environmental scientist from the University of Virginia. Epstein was one of the scientists involved with the research for the new report, and he explained that the reindeer eat lichen, which grows at ground level. But the warming temperature has led to taller vegetation, and it is “out-competing” the lichen. The warmer climate has also meant more bugs in the region, and that results in the reindeer having to spend their day getting the insects off of them or hiding from the insects. Increased rain has caused a problem, because it falls on snowy ground and creates hard layers of ice covering the tundra. This makes it difficult for the animals, because they can’t push their noses through the ice to get to their food. As for what can be done about the problem, the BBC reported that reducing carbon emissions and limiting temperature increases needs to be done on a global scale. Not only will this help the reindeer, but it will also decrease extreme weather events around the world. + NOAA Via BBC Image via U.S. Department of State

The rest is here: 
Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic

Scott Pruitt thinks global warming could be favorable for humans

February 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scott Pruitt thinks global warming could be favorable for humans

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt has once again aired thoughts that depart from mainstream climate science , according to The Guardian . In a recent interview with Nevada TV station News 3 , Pruitt suggested global warming could be beneficial for people. He said, “Do we really know what the ideal surface temperature should be in the year 2100, in the year 2018? It’s fairly arrogant for us to think we know exactly what it should be in 2100.” Pruitt said in an interview with News 3’s Gerard Ramahlo, “No one disputes the climate changes , is changing, that’s, we see that, that’s constant. We obviously contribute to it; we live in the climate, right?…Now measuring that with precision, Gerard, I think is more challenging than is let on at times but I think the bigger question is…is it an existential threat? Is it something that is unsustainable or what kind of effect or harm is this going to have? I mean, we know that humans have most flourished during times of what, warming trends. I mean, so, so, I think there’s assumptions made that because the climate is warming that that necessarily is a bad thing.” Related: Pruitt met with Dow Chemical CEO before denying pesticide ban The EPA administrator echoed an idea that’s been raised in the past of a debate on climate change, to go over “what we do know and what we don’t know, so the American people can be informed and make decisions on their own.” A snapshot of the EPA website on January 19, 2017, the day before Donald Trump was sworn into office, was very clear that the impacts of climate change would threaten human health . They said people could be exposed to disease , be threatened by extreme weather events, or face food insecurity due to climate change impacts. Via The Guardian and News 3 Images via Gage Skidmore on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

Continued here: 
Scott Pruitt thinks global warming could be favorable for humans

On saving forests, the world’s largest carbon sinks

August 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on On saving forests, the world’s largest carbon sinks

Satellite data shows forests in retreat. If the carbon encased in just fir trees is released, our warming blanket of carbon dioxide would turn to an overheating quilt.

Read more:
On saving forests, the world’s largest carbon sinks

Earth’s climate hurtling towards warmth unprecedented in nearly half a billion years

April 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Earth’s climate hurtling towards warmth unprecedented in nearly half a billion years

Climate change is already altering the planet, but the warmth we’re headed for may be greater than anything Earth has experienced in around half a billion years. Three scientists collaborated on a study and penned an article for The Conversation, in which they find Earth could see carbon dioxide (CO2) values not seen since the Eocene Epoch. Carbon concentrations today that match previous high CO2 periods could lead to worse warming . Today’s CO2 concentrations may lead to more warming because the sun has also been getting stronger, according to the University of Southampton’s Gavin Foster, Wesleyan University’s Dana Royer, and the University of Bristol’s Dan Lunt. They explain Earth’s temperature isn’t simply a result of greenhouses gases in the atmosphere; the sun plays a role as well. They write, “…due to the way the sun generates energy through nuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium, its brightness has increased over time. Four and half billion years ago when the Earth was young the sun was around 30 percent less bright.” Related: Ancient marine fossils in the Transantarctic Mountains offer disturbing clues about climate change The scientists point out 1 degree Celsius warming hasn’t been too unusual in terms of geological time. They said the planet has been warmer than it is today for much of Earth’s past. During the last greenhouse state in the Eocene, temperatures on Earth were 10 to 15 degrees Celsius hotter than today. There was no ice in the polar regions and palm trees thrived on Antarctica’s coast then, according to the scientists. But Earth today is technically in an icehouse state – or a time when both poles have ice – even though warming is happening. In the past when the sun got stronger, atmospheric CO2 decreased, in contrast to today, according to the scientists. They wrote, “We found no past time period when the drivers of climate , or climate forcing, was as high as it will be in the future if we burn all the readily available fossil fuel . Nothing like it has been recorded in the rock record for at least 420 million years.” The journal Nature Communications published the three scientists’ research online yesterday. Via The Conversation Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Read more:
Earth’s climate hurtling towards warmth unprecedented in nearly half a billion years

Tiny ice pods provide shelter for cold weather adventurers

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tiny ice pods provide shelter for cold weather adventurers

Czech architecture firm Mjölk Architekti has built a series of tiny ice pods, the design of which took first place in the Warming Huts Competition five years ago, in their home town of Liberec. The “Polar Hens” sit adjacent to the Liberec dam so that local hikers and ice skaters can take a break in the  icy retreats . The igloo pods are made out of a  very thick ice shell  of compressed frozen river water. To construct the pods, a large inflatable balloon is equipped with a sprinkler connected to a compressor and generator. A water pump sprays icy water over the air-filled silicone balloon, creating a thick wall of ice that glows with a light blue tint . When the walls are thick enough, the inflatable base is removed, leaving a nicely formed igloo in its place. Although the pods look small from the outside, the smooth interior is quite spacious, and provides a nice haven for cold weather adventurers. Related: Ice Sculptures Embedded with Seeds Repopulate Riverbeds as they Melt The Polar Hen design won the Warming Huts Competition in 2012 . The annual event features architecture firms from all over the world showcasing their unique cold-weather shelter designs along the Red River Mutual Trail in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The winning designs are chosen by a “blind” jury who judge the entries based on creativity in terms of materials, shelter characteristics , assembly and form, along with integration with the landscape. + Mjölk Architekti Via Archdaily Images via Mjölk Architekti

More here: 
Tiny ice pods provide shelter for cold weather adventurers

Japanese scientists build tiny drone that pollinates like a bee

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Japanese scientists build tiny drone that pollinates like a bee

As concern over dwindling bee populations mounts, a team of chemists at a Japanese institution came up with a robotic solution. They designed pollinating drones : tiny machines that grab and deposit pollen in flowers . The scientists hope their drones won’t utterly replace bees, but would instead take some of the pressure off the remaining pollinators should more perish. Chemists from Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology designed the little drones. On the underside of a two-inch G-Force PXY CAM drone they attached animal hair, and covered it in sticky gel. When the altered machines brushed up against Japanese lilies, they were able to pick up and drop off pollen. Related: Bees placed on the endangered species list for the very first time The journal Chem published a study this week about the advance. Paper co-author Eijiro Miyako told Gizmodo, “TV programs about the pollination crisis, honey bee decline, and the latest robotics emotionally motivated me. I thought we urgently needed to create something for these problems.” Miyako said this is the first instance of drones pollinating flowers, but the little machines aren’t yet ready to zoom out into the world. The scientists aim to add GPS, artificial intelligence , and high resolution cameras to the small machines, which also need to crawl inside certain plants, as bees do. Critics aren’t so convinced pollinating drones is the best solution to the worrying bee crisis. Biologist David Goulson of the United Kingdom’s University of Sussex wrote a blog post on the topic and said, “I would argue that it is exceedingly unlikely that we could ever produce something as cheap or as effective as bees themselves. Bees have been around and pollinating flowers for more than 120 million years; they have evolved to become very good at it. It is remarkable hubris to think that we can improve on that.” Goulson said there are roughly 3.2 trillion bees – which feed themselves at no cost to us but also give us honey – and argued to replace them with machines would be incredibly expensive. Gizmodo points out it could cost $100 per bee to employ pollinating drones. Plus, unless the machines could be made biodegradable , Goulson said we’d potentially experience a huge amount of drone litter. Via Gizmodo and Engadget Images via Eijiro Miyako and G-Force Hobby Facebook

See more here: 
Japanese scientists build tiny drone that pollinates like a bee

Humanity Could Face Global Famine by 2050 Due to Plague of Pests

September 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Humanity Could Face Global Famine by 2050 Due to Plague of Pests

A new U.K study warns that humanity could face a famine of biblical proportions by 2050 due to a plague of pests brought on by climate change . Research from the University of Exeter published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography paints a picture of crop producing countries saturated with pests by the middle of the century. The plague of pests pose a ‘ grave threat to global food security ,’ according to Dr. Dan Bebber of the Biosciences department at the University of Exeter. Read the rest of Humanity Could Face Global Famine by 2050 Due to Plague of Pests Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , biosciences , crops , famine , farming , food , global , pest , security , threat , warming

Original post: 
Humanity Could Face Global Famine by 2050 Due to Plague of Pests

The World’s Largest Ice Sheets are Melting at an Unprecedented Rate

August 22, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The World’s Largest Ice Sheets are Melting at an Unprecedented Rate

A recent report brings more bad news for the future of the human race on Earth, as the world’s two largest ice sheets are melting faster than ever before. On Wednesday the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany released a new report that shows the ice sheets in western Antarctica and Greenland are melting at their fastest rate since observations began – and contributing to sea level rise twice as fast as they were five years ago. Read the rest of The World’s Largest Ice Sheets are Melting at an Unprecedented Rate Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alfred wegener , antarctica , change , climate , glacial , glacier , global , greenland , ice , institute , melt , report , sheet , warming

Continued here: 
The World’s Largest Ice Sheets are Melting at an Unprecedented Rate

C.F. Møller and Brut’s Winning Residential Tower for Antwerp Creates Mini Vertical Communities With Gardens

July 15, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on C.F. Møller and Brut’s Winning Residential Tower for Antwerp Creates Mini Vertical Communities With Gardens

Read the rest of C.F. Møller and Brut’s Winning Residential Tower for Antwerp Creates Mini Vertical Communities With Gardens Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Antwerp architecture , Antwerp towers , Belgium Architecture , C.F. Møller Architects , C.F. Møller Architects Antwerp , glass facades , highrise architecture , tower design , tower facades , tower rooftop garden , vertical communities

Read more here: 
C.F. Møller and Brut’s Winning Residential Tower for Antwerp Creates Mini Vertical Communities With Gardens

White House Announces Plans to Fight Global Warming by Targeting Methane Emissions

March 28, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on White House Announces Plans to Fight Global Warming by Targeting Methane Emissions

While the Obama Administration has thus far focused on reducing carbon emissions to tackle climate change, pressure has been mounting to do something about methane pollution . Although methane accounts for only nine percent of the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions, it’s over 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide when it comes to short term global warming impact. So on Friday, the White House announced a strategy to cut the nation’s methane emissions. Read the rest of White House Announces Plans to Fight Global Warming by Targeting Methane Emissions Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cattle , cow flatulence , global warming , greenhouse gas emissions , methane , natural gas , natural gas flaring , obama , white house        

Go here to read the rest: 
White House Announces Plans to Fight Global Warming by Targeting Methane Emissions

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1281 access attempts in the last 7 days.