Old Sydney warehouse is transformed into an industrial-chic home

October 10, 2018 by  
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Rather than strip Balmain, Sydney of its post-industrial architectural heritage and history, award-winning practice Carter Williamson Architects has taken care to sustainably breathe new life into the area’s old buildings. Case in point is the local studio’s transformation of a former timber factory into a stunning, modern home with industrial-chic styling woven throughout its four levels. Dubbed 102 The Mill, the unique home boasts 403 square meters of space with soaring ceilings and plenty of natural light. The adaptive reuse design is part of a greater redevelopment project in which a sawmill, cottage and factory were repurposed into multiple residences. All of the renovated buildings retain parts of the original construction. In 102 The Mill, these deliberately exposed frameworks are complemented by industrial-inspired lighting fixtures and minimalist, streamlined furnishings. Timber floors and warm fabrics help imbue the former factory with a sense of cozy warmth. Entering from the street-facing north facade, 102 The Mill allocates the main living and bedroom areas to the west side that faces the garden, while the staircase and elevator shaft are set on the eastern side of home. The ground floor includes a spacious entrance foyer that leads to an entertainment room and a guest suite; both rooms have access to the garden . An open-plan living room, kitchen and dining area are on the first floor, and an outdoor terrace has been added to the rear side. The second floor houses the master suite in addition to two bedrooms. The roof terrace offers extra entertaining space. Related: A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof “By embracing its former factory life, The Mill manages to capture the gritty feel of industrial Balmain, sympathetically redefining the traditional Sydney terrace house,” reads the project description. “The result sits with an inevitability, blending in with its inner Sydney surroundings, yet striking forward as a jewel of modern Australian architecture.” + Carter Williamson Architects Photography by Brett Boardman

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Old Sydney warehouse is transformed into an industrial-chic home

Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy

October 10, 2018 by  
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Acclaimed architecture practice Olson Kundig is best known for its spectacular residential works in the Pacific Northwest, yet the Seattle-based firm has embarked on somewhat new ground in its recent submission to the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) competition . Held this year in Melbourne, the international contest has invited designers to create a large-scale and site-specific public artwork that could generate clean energy for the city. In response, Olson Kundig developed Night and Day, a massive solar sail concept designed to produce 1,000 MWh of clean energy through a combination of solar energy and a hydro battery. Launched as part of Victoria State’s Renewable Energy Action Plan and Melbourne’s 2020 net-zero energy goals, the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative competition promotes a “clean energy landscape for a post-carbon world.” Olson Kundig’s Night and Day submission taps into that vision with a sculptural hydro-solar generator that uses eye-catching design to bring clean energy to the forefront of the public’s eye. Proposed for St. Kilda Triangle on Port Phillip Bay, the renewable energy power plant could power up to 200 homes with emissions-free energy, 24 hours a day. During the day, the curved solar sail — topped with 5,400 square meters of photovoltaic panels — collects energy and powers a pump that directs water into a suspended hydro battery vessel. At night, that water would be discharged through two Pelton turbines and transformed by a generator into electricity — a design solution that addresses the common problem of energy storage. Modular and scalable, the Night and Day proposal could also be installed at various sites. Related: This massive Sun Ray could sustainably power 220 homes in Melbourne “This was different because it wasn’t just about creating architecture, something for the pleasure of its inhabitants,” said principal and owner Kevin Kudo-King of the submission, which also doubles as a pedestrian bridge. “It also needed to function as a machine, and it needed to generate power.” The winners of the 2018 LAGI Melbourne competition will be announced at an awards ceremony on October 11, 2018 at Fed Square, Melbourne . + Olson Kundig Images via LAGI

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Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy

Peek inside the BIG-designed garden village for one of the world’s best restaurants

September 24, 2018 by  
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After over three years of planning, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has completed the new home for Noma, an award-winning, Michelin-star restaurant that was named four times as the best in the world by the ‘World’s 50 Best Restaurants’ rankings. Opened February 2018, Noma’s new restaurant location is just outside of Copenhagen’s city center on a lakefront site near the Christiania neighborhood. The 14,000-square-foot building is modeled after a garden village that consists of 11 single-story pavilions, each specially designed to realize chef René Redzepi’s vision for seasonal and local New Nordic cuisine. Last year, chef René Redzepi closed his original two-Michelin-starred Noma after 14 years of operation in a 16th century harborside warehouse. During the one-year closure of his restaurant, Redzepi worked together with architect Bjarke Ingels to sensitively reimagine a new property and an existing ex-military warehouse into “an intimate garden village” made up of a series of interconnected, agrarian-inspired structures centered around the restaurant’s heart: the 600-square-foot kitchen. “The new noma dissolves the traditional idea of a restaurant into its constituent parts and reassembles them in a way that puts the chefs at the heart of it all,” Bjarke Ingels explained. “Every part of the restaurant experience — the arrival, the lounge, the barbecue, the wine selection and the private company — is all clustered around the chefs. From their central position, they have a perfect overview to every corner of the restaurant while allowing every single guest to follow what would traditionally happen behind-the-scenes. Each ‘building within the building’ is connected by glass-covered paths that allow chefs and guests to follow the changes in weather, daylight and seasons — making the natural environment an integral part of the culinary experience.” Related: “The world’s best restaurant,” Noma, to close and reopen as an urban farm The historic, 100-meter-long concrete warehouse was renovated to house all of the restaurant’s back-of-house functions, including the prep kitchen, fermentation labs, fish tanks, terrarium, ant farm and breakout areas for staff. Three of the new structures are built of glass, with one serving as a greenhouse, another as a bakery and the last as the test kitchen. The dining spaces are located in other buildings constructed from a minimalist and natural materials palette that includes oak and brick. + BIG + Noma Images © Rasmus Hjortshoj

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Peek inside the BIG-designed garden village for one of the world’s best restaurants

Old warehouse transformed into a vibrant urban market in Mexico City

July 3, 2017 by  
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Architect Francisco Pardo gave new life to an old warehouse in Mexico City by transforming it into a vibrant urban market. The four-story structure once served as an auto parts shop, however it now features a two-story local grocer, restaurants, a barber’s shop and a yoga studio . The top floor is open to the public and hosts a beer bar. The main challenge for the architects was to adapt the original structure to the new dynamics of the area. They decided to integrate a regular grid of exposed concrete beams, columns and slabs into the venue’s new public role. Related: Foster + Partners unveils plans to rejuvenate Cairo’s Maspero Triangle District “Through it, the street folds to the inside and upwards” says Francisco Pardo, founder of the architectural practice “it’s like a vortex that transversely crosses the building, pulling the street right up to the rooftop ”. + Francisco Pardo Arquitecto Photos by Diana Arnau

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Former garment factory next to NYC’s High Line to be topped with new green spaces

March 31, 2017 by  
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The Warehouse , a massive multi-unit complex a mere stone’s throw away from the High Line in New York City, is getting a facelift. A garment factory in a previous life, the 65,000-square-foot space at 520 West 20th Street currently houses a parking garage and art galleries. But Elijah Equities , the real-estate firm that is redeveloping the building, has grander plans. With the help of Morris Adjmi Architects , Elijah Equities is looking to transform the Warehouse into 100,000 square feet of office and retail space. The proposed increase in footprint will require the addition of three steel-framed, cantilevered stories to the existing four. More than 18,000 square feet of rooftop space will crown the new steel-and-glass extension, which will appear to float above the original unit on a pair of elevator and stairway cores. Related: New renderings of Studio Gang’s Solar Carve building reveal a faceted jewel that hugs the High Line The rear of the building will also be subject to readjustments. Planned upgrades include bigger windows, open floor plans, and plenty of outdoor space. “My intent was to capture the spirit of the original warehouse and develop a creative tension between the powerful brick-and-mortar base and the elegant new addition,” Morris Adjmi told Arch Daily . “I wanted to connect these two beautiful structures without simply fusing them together.” Related: Check out the vibrant outdoor art gallery coming to NYC’s High Line park The abundant greenery “draws parallels” from the High Line next door, Adjmi added. Construction is slated to begin this spring. The Warehouse is expected to receive tenants around the first quarter of 2019. + The Warehouse Via Arch Daily

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Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio Turns an Old Santa Monica Warehouse Into a New Animation Studio

October 22, 2012 by  
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Santa Monica’s  industrial corridor has just seen yet another hi-tech/entertainment company move in and renovate an older building into an inspiring office.  Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio, Inc  and Andy Waisler renewed a 17,000 square-foot, 1940s warehouse into a stunning creative space for a well-known International animation studio. Urban Studio focused on sustainability and conservation throughout the renovation process as a way to preserve the original character of the warehouse. Read the rest of Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio Turns an Old Santa Monica Warehouse Into a New Animation Studio Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animation , Animation Studio , green renovation , Gwynne Pugh , Los Angeles , Santa Monica , tenant improvement , Truss , urban , Urban Studio , warehouse

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Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio Turns an Old Santa Monica Warehouse Into a New Animation Studio

Ask Pablo: Are Repurposed T-Shirts Carbon Neutral?

August 8, 2011 by  
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Image credit: Karen , used under Creative Commons license. Dear Pablo: Say an average fancy t-shirt holds carbon footprint of 6kg but is never sold and sits in the warehouse of a textile/clothing production company. I take that same t-shirt and use it to make a new one. Does the new product inherit the same carbon footprint or is it less because I am repurposing it? Questions such as this are an important part of Life… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Warehouse in San Fran Retrofitted into Beautiful Loft

September 17, 2010 by  
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Read the rest of Warehouse in San Fran Retrofitted into Beautiful Loft http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , green interiors , oriental warehouse , San Francisco , sustainable design , Sustainable Interiors

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