Fruit trees grow on the roofs of this rammed earth home in Hanoi

April 18, 2018 by  
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Vo Trong Nghia Architects puts a fresh spin on the ancient art of rammed earth construction in the Dong Anh house, a modern dwelling with fruit trees growing on the roofs. Taking advantage of the property’s secure and isolated location in Hanoi, the architects applied an “open garden design” that embraces nature in, around, and even on top of the home. The thick earth walls have the advantage of high thermal mass and keep the home cool by storing heat during the day and then dissipating that heat at night. Although Vietnam has a history of rammed earth construction, particularly in the country’s northwest region, most of the country’s construction relies primarily on concrete, not earth. In hopes of promoting the advantages of rammed earth walls in a modern context, Vo Trong Nghia Architects crafted the walls of the Dong Anh house out of soils taken from a variety of land mines, all within 20 miles of the site. The soils were then filtered, ground and mixed with cement and other additives before being compacted in formwork. The diversity of soils creates a unique striation on the compacted, nearly 14-inch-thick walls. Related: Trees grow on every balcony of this Hanoi university building Designed for a large family, the spacious 5,382-square-foot home covers two stories in a roughly H-shaped plan. The first floor comprises the main communal spaces as well as the maid room, storage, and three bedrooms. The second level includes two additional bedrooms and an outdoor courtyard . The fruit trees grown in large planters are located on both roofs. “Amount of fruit trees on the roof, along with the open garden around the house is another emphasis that makes a green, cool and friendly environment to the people,” wrote the architects. “And sloping roof is also a reasonable design for tropical monsoon climate in Vietnam.” + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Images by Hiroyuki Oki

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Fruit trees grow on the roofs of this rammed earth home in Hanoi

Lush rooftop oasis flourishes on a renovated Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City

April 18, 2018 by  
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Formerly a derelict Art Deco structure, Casa Verne has been reborn as a contemporary family home with a secluded getaway in the center of a busy Mexico City neighborhood. Zeller & Moye renovated the 1930s townhouse and took care to preserve period features while injecting new modern touches. The crowning achievement can be found on the roof, where the architects created a lush garden and oasis of native plants. Zeller & Moye’s renovation of the townhouse stripped away internal walls to create more spacious living areas. New roof lights pull in natural light to the previously dim interior while whitewashed walls create a bright and airy atmosphere. Dark-stained wood used on the floors of the first level and on the staircase to the rooftop terrace provide a grounding contrast. Related: Green-roofed timber cabin floats above the ground in Mexico City The service spaces are located on the ground floor, while the main living areas on the first floor are accessed via a striking pink marble staircase. The architects also added a new top floor that houses the master bedroom suite and garden that’s surrounded by high walls for privacy. The floors of the extension as well as the garden path are finished in cut marble pebbles, a reference to Mexico City’s lost riverbeds and lakes. + Zeller & Moye Via Dezeen Images © Omar Mun?oz, Juan Carlos Garza

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Lush rooftop oasis flourishes on a renovated Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City

Trees grow on every balcony of this Hanoi university building

October 20, 2017 by  
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This university building in Hanoi weaves Vietnam’s tropical landscape into its checkerboard facade, with trees growing on every balcony. Designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects , the recently completed FPT University administrative building is the first phase in a greater masterplan to convert the campus into a “globally competition environmentally conscious university.” The university is part of Vietnam’s largest technology park, the Hoa Lac Hi-Tech Park, on the outskirts of Hanoi. Completed early this year, the administrative building serves as a campus gateway and will welcome students, staff, and visitors with its tree -integrated envelope. “The building acts as a gateway to the campus and the green facade clearly dictates the future direction of the campus,” wrote the architects. The nature-infused project is characteristic of the architecture firm’s world-renowned style for bringing plants into buildings. Related: Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain Built of concrete , the asymmetric building is clad in prefabricated facade modules to cut down on waste and construction time. Building orientation and large windows optimize the flow of natural ventilation and daylight into the building, while trees on the balconies minimize solar gain. Accessible green roofs top the structure. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Via Dezeen Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects , by Hoang Le

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Trees grow on every balcony of this Hanoi university building

Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain

September 7, 2017 by  
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Vo Trong Nghia Architects worked their bamboo magic on a slender residence in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City . In a bid to add green space in the city’s increasingly dense concrete jungle, the architects installed giant bamboo-filled planters to the building’s street-facing facade. Located in the city’s colorful and bustling central urban district, the House in District 1 uses the green screens for privacy, air purification, shading, and visual appeal. From the street, the House in District 1 looks like a series of stacked and staggered planters bursting with bushy bamboo . The overgrown effect contrasts sharply with the home’s minimalist and modern design. Concrete is predominately used and is texturized to lessen its monolithic appearance. “In addition to growing bamboo on the front facade, the concrete formwork is also made by using bamboo to allow a consistent design language,” said Vo Trong Nghia Architect, according to Dezeen . “The bamboo texture also helps to reduce the intense and heavy appearance of conventional concrete wall and thus, improves the overall aesthetic quality of the house.” Related: Lush green rooftop terrace invites homeowners outdoors in the foothills of Vietnam The four-story Ho Chi Minh residence features a guest room and entry hall on the first floor with an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen on the floor above. The kids’ bedroom and the master bedroom with ensuite bathroom are located on the second and third floors, respectively. The top floor houses the home office that opens up to an outdoor rooftop swimming pool. The bamboo planters are on every floor and provide privacy, shade, and protection from the tropical rains. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Via Dezeen Images via Hiroyuki Oki

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Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain

Green-roofed gallery in Hanoi lights up like a lantern at night

November 29, 2016 by  
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This green-roofed gallery and lighting showroom in Hanoi is wrapped in a layer of perforated terracotta that filters sunlight into the narrow, tall volume of the building. Natural materials and different patterns and textures, trademarks of Vo Trong Nghia Architects , turn the building into a beautiful combination of traditional Vietnamese architecture and contemporary design. The building is located within Dong Da district in Hanoi. Its interior spaces are organized around a central void that houses a staircase which provides glances of the exhibitions. The terracotta blocks, traditionally used in Vietnamese architecture , facilitate natural ventilation and provide shade from harsh sunlight. These affordable building elements are coupled with a bespoke fixing system, enabling quick and simple assembly. Related: Lush green rooftop terrace invites homeowners outdoors in the foothills of Vietnam The top floor, where the gallery is located, overlooks a large neighboring tree and receives additional lighting through skylights that expose the roof garden above. While the building is in shade during the day, its internal nighttime illumination makes it look like a beautiful lantern. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Hiroyuki Oki , Trieu Chien

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Green-roofed gallery in Hanoi lights up like a lantern at night

Vo Trong Nghia builds a lush rooftop pavilion with nothing but bamboo and rope

November 9, 2015 by  
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Local Motors unveils world’s first 3D-printed car for mass production

November 9, 2015 by  
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3-D printing was unheard of a few years ago, yet today the technology has advanced so fast the world is about to get its first 3D-printed car. Local Motors is getting ready to send their LM3D Swim, comprised of mostly 3D-printed parts, to market. The car will be available for purchase as soon as next Spring, and the price isn’t too terrible. Read the rest of Local Motors unveils world’s first 3D-printed car for mass production

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Green-roofed aerial bridge will connect nature-infused apartment blocks in Ho Chi Minh City

September 28, 2015 by  
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Green Roofed Farming Kindergarten Teaches 500 Vietnamese Children How to Grow Their Own Food

May 1, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Green Roofed Farming Kindergarten Teaches 500 Vietnamese Children How to Grow Their Own Food Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , dongnai , ecofriendly kindergarten , energy efficient , energy efficient building , energy saving , farming kindergarten , green roof , kindergarten , lotus , sustainable kindergarten , Vietnam , Vietnam Green Building Council , vietnamese kindergarten , Vo Trong Nghia Architects

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Green Roofed Farming Kindergarten Teaches 500 Vietnamese Children How to Grow Their Own Food

15 Conical Bamboo Pillars Hold Up Gorgeous Open Air Cafe in Viet Nam

January 20, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of 15 Conical Bamboo Pillars Hold Up Gorgeous Open Air Cafe in Viet Nam Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bamboo , bamboo cafe , bamboo restaurant in Viet Nam , eco design , green design , green materials , natural light , smoke-dried bamboo , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials , Vo Trong Nghia Architects        

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15 Conical Bamboo Pillars Hold Up Gorgeous Open Air Cafe in Viet Nam

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