Vance Tsing Tao Pearl Hill visitor center blends into the landscape with a rolling green roof

August 9, 2017 by  
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Prolific architecture firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson crafted the Vance Tsing Tao Pearl Hill Visitor Center in Qingdao, China with a gorgeous rolling green roof . Located at the base of the Zhushan National Forest Park, the wooden building ‘s undulating canopy mimics the mountain range in the backdrop. At 223,000 square feet, the visitor center is certainly massive, however it was carefully designed to blend into its natural surroundings thanks to its subtle stature and verdant green roof. Additionally, the building is strategically oriented so that visitors can enjoy amazing views of the mountain range on one side and expansive sea views on the other end. Floor-to-ceiling glazed walls provide these views while illuminating the building with natural light . Related: Manetti Shrem Museum’s 50,000-square-foot canopy was inspired by the agrarian landscape The designers choose to use wood as the building’s principle material to create a strong connection to nature. The unique wooden truss roof structure uses large logs to support a layer of Canadian Class J SPF wood. At the center of the undulating roof is an abundance of lush greenery, further integrating the building into its environment. The green roof was strategically designed to insulate the interior and reduce the building’s overall carbon footprint. + Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Via Archdaily Photography by He Lian

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Vance Tsing Tao Pearl Hill visitor center blends into the landscape with a rolling green roof

Breathtaking bamboo building withstands earthquakes and boasts a zero-carbon footprint

August 9, 2017 by  
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Thailand’s eco-friendly Panyaden International School has added a stunning new sports hall to its campus that’s built entirely of bamboo and stays naturally cool year-round in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Designed by Chiangmai Life Construction , the Bamboo Sports Hall features a modern organic design that draws inspiration from the lotus flower. The large multipurpose facility was built to withstand local natural forces including high-speed winds and earthquakes, and boasts a zero-carbon footprint. Completed this year, the Bamboo Sports Hall features a lotus-like organic shape in a nod to Panyaden International School’s use of Buddhist values in its academic curriculum. Its undulating shape also reflects the surrounding hilly topography. The 782-square-meter open-air building is supported with a series of arches and topped with three petal-like round roofs lifted up at the edges to let in natural ventilation and indirect light. The multipurpose facility can accommodate 300 students and includes futsal, basketball, volleyball, and badminton courts, as well as a stage that can be lifted automatically, and storage room for sports and drama equipment. Viewing balconies flank the sporting area and stage. Related: Chiangmai Life Construction creates homes using rammed earth, bamboo and recycled wood Bamboo was selected as the primary building material to maintain Panyaden’s “Green School” mission of a low carbon footprint and to blend in with the school’s existing earth-and-bamboo buildings. “Panyaden’s Sports Hall’s carbon footprint is zero,” write the architects. “The bamboo used absorbed carbon to a much higher extent than the carbon emitted during treatment, transport and construction.” The large openings for natural ventilation, insulation, and use of bamboo help create a comfortable indoor climate year-round. No toxic chemicals were used to treat the bamboo, which has an expected lifespan of at least 50 years. The exposed prefabricated bamboo trusses span over 17 meters. “Here we show how bamboo can create a space that is 15 meters wide and high without any steel reinforcements,” wrote the architects. “From the outside it looks like it has grown there or transformed from one of the rolling hills in the background to become a human artifice. As in fact the Panyaden International School Sports Hall is a combination of careful artistic design, beautiful detailed handicraft and major construction.” + Chiangmai Life Construction Via ArchDaily Images © Alberto Cosi, Markus Roselieb, Chiangmai Life Construction

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Breathtaking bamboo building withstands earthquakes and boasts a zero-carbon footprint

LEED Silver visitor center is a portal to a historic American battlefield

December 12, 2016 by  
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Calling attention to a historic landscape can be difficult when there are few artifacts to differentiate it from its surroundings. New Jersey-based ikon.5 architects successfully brought renewed attention to a historic battlefield from the American Revolutionary War with their design of the Monmouth Battlefield State Park Visitor Center in Manalapan Township, New Jersey. Located on a high point, the building is a glazed LEED Silver -certified pavilion that frames views of the battlefield while maintaining a minimal energy footprint. The Monmouth Battlefield State Park Visitor Center replaced an underutilized structure built for the Bicentennial and comprises office space, a theater, museum store, exhibition space, classrooms, an archeology lab, and restrooms. Though the pavilion features many programmatic features, its thoughtful design keeps the focus on the landscape thanks to its custom-fabricated “mullion-less” glass curtain wall . The largely glazed building appears to float on the landscape and offers unobstructed views of the battlefield from the museum . “Sited at the top of Combs Hill overlooking the Battlefield, the pavilion is conceived as a modern day primitive hut, templar in its siting, but diminutive in its appearance,” write the architects. Related: University of Pennsylvania’s green-roofed New College House targets LEED Silver The building achieved LEED Silver certification thanks to the installation of triple-glazed low-e laminated glazing that wraps around the building and minimizes heat gain and loss. The roof features long eaves to shade the interior and further minimize unwanted solar heat gain. The new visitor center was built within the bounds of the existing property to minimize site impact and incorporates renovated portions of the original building. Rainwater collected on the roof is reused in a rain garden . A geothermal system is used to heat and cool the building. + ikon.5 architects Images via ikon.5 architects , by Jeffrey Totaro and James D’Addio

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LEED Silver visitor center is a portal to a historic American battlefield

Extreme rain storms in the US could increase by 400% due to climate change

December 12, 2016 by  
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The forecast of America’s future includes a 400 percent increase in the number of extreme rain storms if climate change has its way. Six scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) found the frequency of intense rainstorms could increase by 2100, and could dump 70 percent more rain, in the absence of powerful action on climate change. The frequency of very extreme rainstorms leading to flooding or destruction could ramp up from once per season to five times per season before the end of this century, an increase of 400 percent, according to the NCAR scientists. Even worse, when those storms do come, they could hit harder, damaging infrastructure and homes that aren’t equipped to handle the deluge. Lead author Andreas Prein told The Guardian these rainstorms could be one of climate change’s worst consequences in the United States. Related: Winter storms will hit new extremes as the planet gets warmer every year The increase in rain could mainly affect the Atlantic and Gulf coast areas, but even the central part of America, which could get drier under warmer temperatures, might see extreme rainfall. The problem is that for dry areas, moderate rainstorms that nourish the land wouldn’t happen as much as drastic downpours that would damage crops. Other analyses have revealed extreme rainfall is more likely to happen already because of climate change. Prein said the extreme rainstorms we see now could intensify in the future if we don’t step up and do something. He still seems to hold out hope these increased extreme weather patterns aren’t a done deal in the future. He told The Guardian, “It’s really in our hands to change that if we want to.” By limiting emissions, there might still be more extreme rain, but not as much as the NCAR scientists predict. The journal Nature Climate Change published the scientists’ study online this week. Via The Guardian Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Extreme rain storms in the US could increase by 400% due to climate change

This green-roofed visitor center will be nestled under a hill in Denmark

November 28, 2016 by  
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The green-roofed Skamlingsbanken Visitor Center near Sjølund in southern Denmark will blur the line between nature and architecture. CEBRA Architects ‘ winning proposal envisions a series of exhibition and gathering spaces formed under a softy curving hill. The project is designed to serve as a gateway to the area’s historic legacy. The center will be located at the highest point of an undulating moraine landscape in southern Denmark, with spectacular views over the Little Belt strait. It will articulate the natural surroundings and provide a contemplative space where visitors can explore the history of the area, which acted as a cultural gathering point during the most politically and culturally turbulent times in the country’s history. The site functioned as a natural stage for advocates for the Danish language, front-runners of the feminist movement, and a celebration marking the end of WWII. Related: CEBRA’s Smart School Meadow is an inclusive learning space that doubles as community center in Russia By lifting a single point within the landscape along a linear cut, the architects created an addition to the landscape in the form of a hill which accommodates the visitor center. From the starting point for hikes, visitors are guided into the landscape or can explore the exhibition and educational facilities within. Various routes provides by the project allow people to freely explore the area, joining a long list of historical events that shaped the nation. + CEBRA Architects Via Archdaily

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This green-roofed visitor center will be nestled under a hill in Denmark

Floating observatory on the Dutch flat sands changes shape with the tides

August 15, 2016 by  
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Drie Streken is located at the centre of ‘Zeven Stricken’ (seven illuminated points of the compass), on the island of Terschelling, and was built as part of this year’s 10-day Oerol Festival. It can be approached via a long boardwalk that leads to a main circular pavilion that serves as a meeting location illuminated by the solar system’s central star. Its shape, formed by vertical wooden poles, opens and closes according to the tides to reveal the changing environment. Related: Cosmically-cool Urban Campsite colonizes a deserted beach in Amsterdam The structure’s almost imperceptible movement directs the visitor’s gaze. A few mirrors, or Heliostats , were located within up to 2 km of the structure, warming up and illuminating the meeting location. The artist said the observatory is designed to”travel along the wadden over the next four years. At each location, a connection will be sought between the sand flats, the sun, and the horizon with the illuminated points of the compass and the tide.” + Marc van Vliet Via Ignant Photos by Marc van Vliet

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Floating observatory on the Dutch flat sands changes shape with the tides

Unprecedented Louisiana flooding forced tens of thousands to evacuate

August 15, 2016 by  
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Over the weekend, heavy rains across the southern United States caused severe flooding in Louisiana , putting tens of thousands of local residents in danger. Creeks and rivers near Baton Rouge overflowed, and water rushed into streets and homes faster than many people anticipated. Officials say over 20,000 residents have been rescued so far from the north and east parts of the cities, stretching west past Lafayette. So far, at least six people have been killed by the floodwaters. Of those who have perished in the floods to date, three were motorists drowned when their cars were swept away after many major roadways were overtaken by water. The floods left many other drivers stranded, but state officials report that all surviving motorists were rescued from the roads by Sunday evening. The flooding has destroyed thousands of homes and displaced at least 10,000 local residents so far. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards requested an emergency declaration, which President Barack Obama granted on Sunday, allowing the state to tap into federal funds for continued recovery and relief efforts. Related: 26-acre Louisiana sinkhole swallows whole trees in 30 seconds (VIDEO) The storms that spurred the flooding have dispersed, but officials say that does not mean the worst is over. As tributaries and backwaters continue to fill, fed by already swollen rivers upstream, more flooding is expected. How severe or widespread the flooding will be is anyone’s guess. “The simple fact of the matter here is we’re breaking records,” the governor told reporters on Sunday. “And any time you break a record, the National Weather Service cannot tell you what you can expect in the way of the floodwaters: how wide they’re going to be and how deep they’re going to be.” Although southern Louisiana caught the brunt of flooding from the weekend storms, the National Weather Service has a ‘flash flood threat’ warning in effect across the south and midwest, stretching from Texas to the Ohio River valley. That alert will continue through Wednesday, as more rains are expected across the region. + How to help Louisiana flood victims Via New York Times and NOLA.com Images via Wikipedia and Red Cross Mid-South

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Unprecedented Louisiana flooding forced tens of thousands to evacuate

Gloomy office transformed into a light-filled BREEAM Excellent building

August 15, 2016 by  
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Built in the 1970s, the original A.S.R. headquarters was a mostly opaque behemoth considered one of the largest office buildings from its time. The architects were tasked with bringing the building up to current building standards and regulations, but rather than start from scratch they preserved select building elements and recycled 98% of the demolition waste. The most notable change to the building is the installation of large glass facades that give the headquarters a new sense of transparency and openness. Related: BREEAM Excellent Library of Birmingham to be Europe’s Largest Public Cultural Space Most impressively, the headquarters was renovated to BREEAM Excellent sustainability standards. The slanted glass facades bring daylight deep into the building, improve natural ventilation, and reduce dependence on artificial lighting. Vertical green walls clad parts of the exterior, while the addition of winter gardens with mature trees bring fresh air and nature to the building interior and exterior. There’s also a greater diversity of workspaces, from open offices to intimate meeting rooms. A total of 2,800 flexible workspaces cater to the firm’s 4,000 employees. There’s also a new underground meeting center, restaurant, and coffee bar. + Team V Architectuur Via ArchDaily Images © Jannes Linders

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Gloomy office transformed into a light-filled BREEAM Excellent building

Pombal Castle’s Magnificent Visitor Center is a Limestone Monolith in a Medieval Fortress

November 11, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Pombal Castle’s Magnificent Visitor Center is a Limestone Monolith in a Medieval Fortress Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: castle revitalization , castle ruins , Comoco Arquitectos , exhibition space , green renovation , medieval architecture , medieval castle , Pombal Castle , Portuguese architects , virtual history , visitor center

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Pombal Castle’s Magnificent Visitor Center is a Limestone Monolith in a Medieval Fortress

Michael Jantzen’s Sun Rays Visitors Center Generates Solar Electricity in the Desert

June 13, 2014 by  
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Michael Jantzen has unveiled a conceptual design for the Sun Rays Visitor Center, a steel and concrete educational facility that doubles as a solar electric power plant in the desert. The off-grid facility generates electricity by converting the heat of the sun reflected and focused in hundreds of installed mirrors into steam. The Sun Rays Visitors Center’s yellow radial form was inspired by the way sun rays reflect off of the mirrors and the center also consists of a viewing platform, office space, and exhibition area. + Michael Jantzen The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: michael jantzen , reader submitted content , solar electric power plant , solar electricity , Solar Power , solar power plant , sun rays visitors center

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Michael Jantzen’s Sun Rays Visitors Center Generates Solar Electricity in the Desert

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