Vincent Callebaut’s Arboricole tower brings vertical agriculture to the city

March 20, 2018 by  
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Vincent Callebaut Architectures , known for green projects that combine smart building with advanced renewable energy solutions, has officially unveiled Arboricole – a new “biophilic” building that brings agriculture to the urban landscape. Residents of the building can grow food on their own terraces thanks to permaculture , with the building’s curved, sinuous design acting to reduce turbulence and maximize comfort in these elevated gardens. Arboricole aims to answer a vital question: how can we adapt our European historic cities to climate change and the ensuing phenomena of strong floods, heavy rains, and current heat waves? To help combat these events, the building is covered with endemic plants from the Loire region that act as a “sponge,” limiting its carbon footprint,  collecting rainwater , and optimizing the residents’ quality of life. Related: Vincent Callebaut’s twisting carbon-absorbing skyscraper nears completion in Taipei White tuffeau stone covers the building’s wave-shaped facade. The architects drew inspiration from the agriculture of the Angevin groves, whose undulating plateaus create a visually engaging waterfall effect. Designed for the intersection of Boulevard Ayrault and Quai Gambetta in Angers, France, the building gradually rises to 114 feet (35 meters) and maximizes the amount of sunshine each terrace receives during the day.   Related: This plant-covered Singapore skyscraper is the tropical building of the future Micro-perforated satin aluminum plates serve as false acoustic ceilings for the balconies, absorbing the noise pollution emitted by car traffic and showcasing the plant life climbing Arboricole’s vertical grove. And, not to be outdone, the plants themselves – 20,000 perennials, shrubs, and trees – could absorb up to 50 tons of CO2 in Angers’s atmosphere each year.   +Vincent Callebaut Architectures

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Vincent Callebaut’s Arboricole tower brings vertical agriculture to the city

Visionary eco-resort design for the Philippines features rotating seashell towers

September 19, 2017 by  
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Visionary eco-architect Vincent Callebaut has just unveiled images of his latest ecological masterpiece and it’s jaw-droppingly stunning. Nautilus is a futuristic 27,000-square-meter eco-resort designed for Palawan, Philippines. The beautiful self-sustaining complex, which would include various research centers, shell-shaped hotels and rotating apartment towers, is designed to be a shining example of how resilient tourism can allow travelers to discover the world without destroying it. Callebaut designed Nautilus to be a resilient, self-sustaining community that includes a series of rotating apartments and luxury hotels, along with a elementary school and sports center. Also on site would be a scientific research and learning center for travelers who’d like to collaborate with engineers, scientists, and ecologists in actively taking part in improving the local environment. It’s a pioneering collaborative concept focused on using real-world education to foster and spread the idea of responsible ecotourism –  or as the architect describes it – “a voluntary approach to reimburse ecological debt”. Related: Vincent Callebaut’s Twisting Citytree Towers Generate More Energy Than They Consume Using the principles of biomimicry , the design is inspired by the “shapes, structures, intelligence of materials and feedback loops that exist in living beings and endemic ecosystems.” The construction and operation of the complex would work under a “zero-emission, zero-waste, zero-poverty” ethos, using 100 percent reused and/or recycled materials from the surrounding area. All of the materials used in the construction would be bio-sourced products derived from vegetable biomass. Microalgae and linseed oil would be used to manufacture organic tiles, while any wood used would be locally-sourced from eco-responsible forests. Even the luxury lodgings would be self-sustaining, playing a strong role in the design’s net-zero energy profile. The main tourist village would be built on telescopic piles that produce ocean thermal energy as well as tidal energy. This energy, along with photovoltaic cells , would produce sufficient energy for the the village, which will also be installed with vertical walls and green roofs to increase the buildings’ thermal inertia and optimize natural temperature control. To the west, twelve small spiral towers with a total of 164 units are designed to be built on rotating bases that turn on their axis according to the course of the sun, fully rotating 360 degrees in one day, providing optimal views of the surrounding environment and taking advantage of a full day of natural light. On the east side, the complex would have 12 small snail-shaped “museum-hotels” constructed with recycled concrete . The hotels will feature various exhibition spaces on the bottom floors and guests rooms on the upper floors. At the heart of the resort will be Origami Mountain, slated to house a scientific research center and nautical recreation area. The building would be constructed using a Cross Laminated Timber framework that would be layered to create a number of undulating ramps that fold out like a massive origami structure. + Vincent Callebaut + Nautilus Eco-Resort Images via Vincent Callebaut

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Visionary eco-resort design for the Philippines features rotating seashell towers

Vincent Callebaut envisions Belgiums industrial zone as an amazing energy-generating community

January 12, 2017 by  
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Designer Vincent Callebaut presents an amazing green facelift to the century-old warehouses at Belgium’s former industrial site Tour & Taxis in his latest designs for a mixed-use eco-neighborhood. His masterplan transforms the 40-hectare post-industrial site into a sustainable community draped in greenery that generates more energy than its residents need. His futuristic design is part of a greater vision to help European cities transition their built environments towards a post-carbon future. Built at the turn of the 20th century to serve as a major freight and customs clearance center, Tour & Taxis was once the shining jewel of industrialization’s golden age with its majestic engineering, ironwork, and stonework. The 40-hectare industrial site was built atop former wetlands located on the Brussels canal close to the heart of the city. Today, the area is undergoing major renewal and many of the impressive warehouses have been converted into offices, shops, restaurants, and exhibition spaces. Callebaut’s masterplan supports the adaptive reuse trend and expands on it with the design of a mixed-use eco-neighborhood to provide residences, as well as additional retail and office space. The redevelopment would be organized along the Brussels canal and is centered on the transformation of the Marine Terminal into the BIOCAMPUS, a 50,000-square-meter mixed-use space constructed with cross-laminated timber and inspired by biomimetic design . Three heavily landscaped residential buildings—called “vertical forests”—would sit across the repurposed Marine Terminal, totaling 85,000 square meters of new residential space. Related: Futuristic oceanscapers are floating villages 3D-printed from algae and plastic waste The energy-efficient architecture is designed to produce more energy than its users need thanks to passive design, renewable energy production through wind and solar, earth-air heat exchangers for natural ventilation, evapotranspiration gardens, geothermal stations, and more. Construction would use biosourced materials that contained recycled content or can be recycled according to cradle-to-cradle standards. Non-motorized transport would be prioritized in the neighborhood. + Vincent Callebaut Images via Vincent Callebaut

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Vincent Callebaut envisions Belgiums industrial zone as an amazing energy-generating community

Urban farming utopia in India produces more energy than it uses

February 22, 2016 by  
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6 animal-shaped architectural wonders

January 22, 2016 by  
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Futuristic oceanscapers are floating villages 3D-printed from algae and plastic waste

December 28, 2015 by  
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Wooden Orchids reimagines the shopping mall as a living, breathing ecotopia

June 5, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Wooden Orchids reimagines the shopping mall as a living, breathing ecotopia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bioclimatic design , biomimicry , china , conscious consumerism , Design Competition , eco design , eco shopping , geothermal heating and cooling , green design , organic foods , ount Lu Estate of World Architecture Competition , passive design , rainwater harvesting , recycling , renewable energy , responsible shopping , sustainable design , vincent callebaut , wooden orchids

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7 Futuristic floating cities that could save humanity

April 8, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of 7 Futuristic floating cities that could save humanity Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AT Design Office , carbon absorbing city , energy efficient city , floating city project , harvest city , modular city , noah’s oak , overcrowding , rising sea levels , self-sufficient city , silt lake city , the lilypad , vincent callebaut , x sea ty , X-Tu , Zero Carbon , zero emission

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Biomimicry in buildings: 6 animal-shaped architectural wonders

February 26, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Biomimicry in buildings: 6 animal-shaped architectural wonders Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal shaped buildings , biomimicry , biomimicry in architecture , buildings shaped like animals , Dragon Bridge Han River Vietnam , institute for computational design , institute of building structures and structural design , javier senosiain , Javier Senosiain Nautilus House , Jeongok Prehistory Museum , RMJM , RMJM Zhuhai Observation Tower , University of Stuttgart , University of Stuttgart beetle pavilion , vincent callebaut , Vincent Callebaut floating whale garden

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Biomimicry in buildings: 6 animal-shaped architectural wonders

This Japanese robot-hat will feed you tomatoes while you jog

February 26, 2015 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. File under ‘things we never knew we needed’… and are actually pretty sure we still don’t: this robot/hat/backpack contraption by Japanese ketchup kings Kagome will feed you a steady stream of tomatoes while you go for a run. According to the AFP “The Tomatan is a backpack that can be loaded with six mid-sized tomatoes —e nough, say the makers, to power runners through [last] weekend’s Tokyo Marathon.” Because, it turns out, tomatoes are really good at fighting fatigue. The downside? The contraption weighs in at 18lbs, so one might want to consider just packing a banana or two instead. Via Slate Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: fruit , kagome , nutrition , nutrition for runners , robot backpack , robto , sustainable food , tokyo marathon , tomato , tomato bot , tomatoes , tomaton , weird robot

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