Rivers of Ice: Vanishing Glaciers

October 11, 2011 by  
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A little over a year ago, Alex wrote about David Breashears’ Rivers of Ice project, which documents how glaciers are receding. The BBC has a very cool slideshow that gives you a narrated tour of various glaciers and how they have evolved (devolved?) over the past decades. It looks great, and shows a large-scale effect of global warming. Kudos to David Breashears and his team! Vi… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Rivers of Ice: Vanishing Glaciers

China To Begin Additional Taxes On Fossil Fuel Production, Rare Earths Mining

October 11, 2011 by  
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It’s not exactly a carbon tax, but it’s a step in the right direction: AP reports that China will begin a nationwide tax on oil, natural gas, rare earth elements, salt, and other metals–with the estimated $615-770 million a year raised used to “help local governments pay for costly obligation imposed by Beijing to provide additional education, health and other services.”… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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China To Begin Additional Taxes On Fossil Fuel Production, Rare Earths Mining

48 Facts You Should Know About The Gulf of Mexico, From Sunken Ships to Ancient Corals

October 11, 2011 by  
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Photo by Calsidyrose via Flickr CC Did you know that the Gulf of Mexico is the ninth largest body in the world, and supports some of the largest fisheries in the world? The Gulf is a spectacular space with an astonishing diversity of species, and yet it may also be one of the most imperiled. Here’s some of the most interesting facts about the Gulf of Mexico that will inspire you to learn more about this unique place. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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48 Facts You Should Know About The Gulf of Mexico, From Sunken Ships to Ancient Corals

Compost Shuttle Pioneer Hauls Trash on His Back Seat

October 4, 2011 by  
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When I posted about a compost shuttle start-up that was seeking funding to expand , there was some speculation as to the carbon footprint of services like this. Of course the least impact would be to build a DIY worm bin or similar backyard solution but, when backyard solutions are not possible, do small-scale collection efforts make sense? An article in the Raleigh News & Observer on how

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Compost Shuttle Pioneer Hauls Trash on His Back Seat

Thousands Ask Univ. of Michigan Stadium to Go Solar

October 3, 2011 by  
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From the Redskins’ huge solar installation to a solar-powered NASCAR track that mows its grass with sheep , major sporting venues can be an ideal location for solar power. From large expanses of rooftops and parking lots to their high energy needs to their visibility (symbolism and visibility are hugely important in the early days of the ongoing clean tech revolution). But it’s not just the pros that have an opportunity to pioneer… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Thousands Ask Univ. of Michigan Stadium to Go Solar

Walgreens Plans 130 Solar-powered Stores Nationwide

September 26, 2011 by  
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With research showing the installed cost of solar dropping 11% in just 6 months , it’s little wonder that corporations like Wal-Mart are ramping up their plans to go solar aggressively . Walgreens made headline back in 2006 for its commitment to solar , but that commitment to solar has only continued. Now the company has just

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Walgreens Plans 130 Solar-powered Stores Nationwide

What If The World Population Doesn’t Stabilize At 10bn?

September 23, 2011 by  
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When I posted about a study forecasting that electric cars may not be cost competitive until 2030 , fellow TreeHugger Mike reminded me that prediction is always a dangerous game. Yet when experts tell us that the future will look like this, or like that, we tend to listen. Yale360 has a fascinating piece on one of the most commonly touted predictions for the coming century—that the Global population will stabilize around 10bn. But, asks Carl Haub,

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What If The World Population Doesn’t Stabilize At 10bn?

Is the U.S. Reaching Peak Water?

September 16, 2011 by  
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Circle of Blue has a good piece on our peak water problem, including definitions of the types of peak water: “There are three different definitions of “peak water” and there is evidence that the U.S., or parts of the country, have exceeded peak constraints for all three: Peak Renewable Water, Peak Non-Renewable Water, and Peak Ecological Water.” … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Is the U.S. Reaching Peak Water?

What You Should Look for When Buying a Chicken Coop

September 16, 2011 by  
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You know that backyard chicken keeping has gone mainstream when national newspapers feature a consumer guide on what to look for in a chicken coop. From video instructionals on how to build a chicken coop to the ultra-trendy Omlet, aka “the iPod of chicken houses” , we’ve certainly seen a fair few options ourselves. But now poultry expert Andy Cawthray gives a detailed rundown of

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What You Should Look for When Buying a Chicken Coop

Charles Scott Howard: The Miner Who Took On Big Coal

September 15, 2011 by  
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Huffington Post has an excellent piece detailing the story of Charles Scott Howard, a miner who revealed just how unsafe mining practices are. “Howard was the only working miner to appear before officials that day. His testimony came in the form of a video he’d shot in his own mine, which was run by the Cumberland River Coal Company, a subsidiary of the second-largest coal producer in the U.S., Arch Coal. Before Howard aired his video in front of a packed room, his attorney, Tony Oppegard, noted repeatedly for the r… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Charles Scott Howard: The Miner Who Took On Big Coal

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