IKEA, David Chang and ruler of Dubai invest $40 million in AeroFarms vertical farming

November 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

If there was any question that indoor vertical farming is the future of agriculture, the latest announcement from AeroFarms will remove any doubt. The revolutionary company just secured a whopping $40 million in financing from world-renowned chef David Chang, megabrand IKEA and the ruler of Dubai — Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid. The company intends to use the money to address the escalating challenge of bringing healthy, sustainable food to the growing global population using their innovative aeroponic growing system. AeroFarms grows leafy greens without sunlight or soil in vertically-stacked troughs in a fully-controlled indoor environment. It’s better for the planet than traditional agriculture because it requires 95 percent less water, grows in half the time of traditional crops, doesn’t deplete soil and can be grown year-round and served locally — even in cold climates. Related: AeroFarms is building the world’s largest indoor vertical farm just 45 mins from Manhattan David Chang, founder of the Momofuku Group, said, “Momofuku has always championed local farmers and is continuously looking for innovative solutions to improve our quality and sustainability practices. AeroFarms’ incredible technology allows them to grow consistent, high-quality ingredients all year round. At the end of the day, the goal is always to find delicious ingredients from local purveyors we admire, and I am excited to partner with AeroFarms.” IKEA, which has long championed indoor farming, funding innovations through Space10 and releasing their own indoor gardening system , also invested in the company. Rounding out the investment was Meraas , the investment vehicle of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, vice president of the United Arab Emirates and ruler of Dubai. + AeroFarms Via Agfundernews

Read more: 
IKEA, David Chang and ruler of Dubai invest $40 million in AeroFarms vertical farming

Smart living wall monitored by artificial intelligence purifies indoor air

November 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

We spend around 22 hours per day inside, often exposed to more pollutants than we are outside. In an effort to improve indoor air quality and reconnect humans with nature , Finland -based health technology company Naava has designed a smart green wall monitored by sensors and artificial intelligence . They describe their product as a “fully automated air purifier, humidifier, and living plant wall all in one,” and even boast a scientific study to support the claim that their wall sucks pollutants out of the air. The philosophy behind Naava’s green wall is fairly simple: plants absorb air, the microbes of their roots purify that air, and then fans send the purified air back into the room. Plants grow in a soiless growth medium on the vertical garden , which can be attached to a wall or act as a space divider. It can even be set up on a wheelbase to move freely around a room. The green wall is equipped with an integrated water tank, and doesn’t require natural light as it has a lamp. Related: Nearly 10,000 plants grow on NYC’s largest public indoor green wall Naava co-founder and chief technology officer Niko Järvinen said in a statement , “Every American inhales as much as 3,000 gallons of contaminated indoor air every day…Humans are not at their most efficient and healthiest in an artificial indoor environment. Naava wants to change that and create human-friendly and health-enhancing indoors spaces with the help of the world’s only smart green wall.” The green walls naturalize 650 square feet of air, according to the company. They say their product reduces harmful chemicals in the air, and a study released online late October in the journal Air Quality, Atmosphere, and Health seems to back that up. Seven researchers from institutions in Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom tested Naava’s green wall and found a high level of volatile organic compound removal efficiency, according to the study. The Naava service team maintains the green walls every four to six weeks, and charges $249 a month for their Nature as a Service solution. The team boasts more than 1,000 smart green wall installations, and recently introduced their green wall to the United States at this year’s Greenbuild . They also recently opened a New Jersey production facility. + Naava Images courtesy of Naava

More here:
Smart living wall monitored by artificial intelligence purifies indoor air

Nearly 10,000 plants grow on NYCs largest public indoor green wall

September 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Nearly 10,000 plants grow on NYCs largest public indoor green wall

A tropical oasis has blossomed inside Manhattan’s concrete jungle. Greenery NYC recently unveiled the city’s largest public living green wall in Korean beauty brand Innisfree’s flagship store in Union Square earlier this month. Lush, textured, and evergreen, the beautiful 1,820-square-foot wall grows nearly 10,000 plants with eleven different tropical varieties that can be enjoyed year-round. Korean beauty brand Innisfree prides itself on its use of natural materials and is no stranger to the use of green walls in their shops. The living wall at this new Union Square location, however, is at a much larger scale than the company typically handles. Measuring 76 feet in length and 24 feet in height, this lush living wall of plants fills up an entire wall and is equipped with a custom-designed irrigation system that minimizes water use and maintenance. Related: The world’s tallest vertical garden lives and breathes in Sydney “Construction is already a difficult process with many moving parts, but when you factor in almost 10,000 living organisms that each need individual care to stay alive during the build out, it almost feels like you’re trying to juggle while walking a tight rope,” said Adam Besheer, Director of Operations at Greenery NYC. “Seeing the finished product is an incredible reward though—we’re excited to work with a company that shares our values, and for the chance to once again introduce the enormous beauty of natural plant life in the city.” Greenery NYC, which creates plant-filled multi-sensory sanctuaries in the city, has also created similar lush green walls and projects for high-profile clients such as Etsy , The Brooklyn Nets, and TED Talks. + Greenery NYC

View original here:
Nearly 10,000 plants grow on NYCs largest public indoor green wall

Shanghai is planning a massive 100-hectare vertical farm to feed 24 million people

April 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Shanghai is planning a massive 100-hectare vertical farm to feed 24 million people

International architecture firm Sasaki just unveiled plans for a spectacular 100-hectare urban farm set amidst the soaring skyscapers of Shanghai. The project is a mega farming laboratory that will meet the food needs of almost 24 million people while serving as a center for innovation, interaction, and education within the world of urban agriculture. The Sunqiao Urban Agricultural District is composed of vertical farms that fit in nicely between the city’s many towers, adding a welcomed green counterpart to the shiny metal and glass cityscape. In a city like Shanghai, where real estate prices make vertical building more affordable, the urban farm layout counts on a number of separate buildings that will have various growing platforms such as algae farms , floating greenhouses, vertical walls and even seed libraries. The project incorporates several different farming methods including hydroponic and aquaponic systems. Related:Sasaki Architecture convert a former disco club into an office space with floating walls The masterplan was designed to provide large-scale food production as well as education. Sunqiao will focus on sustainable agriculture as a key component for urban growth. “This approach actively supports a more sustainable food network while increasing the quality of life in the city through a community program of restaurants, markets, a culinary academy, and pick-your-own experience” explained Sasaki. “As cities continue to expand, we must continue to challenge the dichotomy between what is urban and what is rural. Sunqiao seeks to prove that you can have your kale and eat it too.” Visitors to the complex will be able to tour the interactive greenhouses, a science museum, and aquaponics systems, all of which are geared to showcase the various technologies which can help keep a large urban population healthy. Additionally, there will be family-friendly events and workshops to educate children about various agricultural techniques . + Sasaki Via Archdaily

Here is the original: 
Shanghai is planning a massive 100-hectare vertical farm to feed 24 million people

Thousands of grafted flowers grow on the entire face of this Milan building

April 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Thousands of grafted flowers grow on the entire face of this Milan building

A stunning show for the eyes—and nose—has taken over the facade of a building in Milan . Local design studio Piuarch teamed up with landscape architect Cornelius Gavril to create ‘Flowerprint,’ a gardening facade installation with 2,000 aromatic flowers and herbs grafted onto tubers. The plants, which range from roses and lilies to thyme and lavender, create a multicolored “flower embroidery” exploring a new multi-sensory way of decorating surfaces. Created for Brera Design Week in Milan, Flowerprint is a temporary gardening facade installed on the facade of the building where Piuarch is located in the courtyard of Via Palermo 5. The constellation of flowers comprises 200 vertical lines of 2,000 suspended plants to cover the entirety of the 10-meter-tall and 20-meter-wide building facade from ground to roof. “The flowered wall uses the different varieties in their colour and material condition to create a pattern, a sort of actual floral graphism, in three dimensions: olfactory, material and in constant transformation depending on light and humidity conditions,” writes Piuarch. Related: ‘Kinetic’ rooftop garden uses pallets and plants to create the illusion of movement To extend the lifespan of the cut flowers, the designers grafted the plants onto potato plants using an ancient technique. The potato plants provide a structural basis and nutrients to the flowers. The fragrance of the flowers and aromatic herbs are enhanced with natural outdoor perfumes produced by Adar. Flowerprint is on display from April 4 to April 9, 2017. + Piuarch

More here:
Thousands of grafted flowers grow on the entire face of this Milan building

SPACE10 creates an open-source Growroom you can build at home

February 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on SPACE10 creates an open-source Growroom you can build at home

SPACE10, a future-living lab and exhibition space in Copenhagen, wants to change the modern food industry. In September, we shared news of the group’s Growroom – a spherical farm pod that lets you grow food just about anywhere. Now SPACE10 wants people to build their own Growroom right at home with open-source plans for the ingenious design. Grab some plywood and a rubber hammer and get ready to grow. The Growroom spherical garden helps to “empower people to grow their own food much more locally in a beautiful and sustainable way,” according to SPACE10. Last year, people across the globe, from Taipei to Helsinki, expressed interest in getting their own Growroom, but the group didn’t want to create a new way to grow local food just to manufacture and ship the pod across entire oceans. So they decided to make the concept completely free for people to build on their own. Related: The Growroom is a spherical farm pod that brings agriculture to city streets Although the Growroom has a tiny footprint, it is capable of growing substantial quantities of food in a small space. It is open in the center, so you can step inside and immerse yourself in nature even in the middle of the city. Not to mention food is more nutritious and tasty when picked and eaten fresh . The design was created by architects Mads-Ulrik Husum and Sine Lindholm. It requires 17 steps, 17 pieces of plywood, a rubber hammer, and some screws; you will also need access to a CNC milling machine or laser cutter – your local fab lab or maker space should be able to get you up and running. If you decide to make one of your own, be sure to let us know , and give a shoutout to @space10_journal on Instagram – we can’t wait to see what you come up with. + Growroom plans + Space10 Images via Alona Vibe , Rasmus Hjortshøj , Niklas Vindelev and Space10

See more here:
SPACE10 creates an open-source Growroom you can build at home

Singapore’s giant vertical farm grows 80 tons of vegetables every year

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Singapore’s giant vertical farm grows 80 tons of vegetables every year

This vertical farm in Singapore grows a whopping 80 tons of veggies every single year. The farm was founded by Panasonic , and it uses LED lights to quickly and efficiently grow produce indoors without depending on unpredictable weather conditions. Panasonic believes indoor farming is a key to the future that could solve food supply issues worldwide. Panasonic started their indoor farm in a 2,670 square foot space and initially produced 3.6 tons of vegetables per year. But the company’s Agriculture Business Division assistant manager Alfred Tham recently told Business Insider that the farm has quadrupled its square footage and food output. Related: Futuristic Japanese indoor vertical farm produces 12,000 heads of lettuce a day with LED lighting Vertical farming allows Panasonic to make the most of the warehouse space, although they do grow their plants in soil in contrast to many vertical farms. They source their LED lights from a local company. Rather than depending on sunlight or rain showers, the farmers can control the indoor farm’s climate – including pH levels, temperature, and oxygen. 40 varieties of crops grow in the indoor farm – from mizuna to romaine lettuce, mini red radishes and Swiss chard. But the goal is to start cultivating 30 additional varieties by March of this year. Right now the flourishing farm accounts for just 0.015 percent of produce grown in the country, but Panasonic hopes to boost that statistic up to five percent. As Singapore currently imports more than 90 percent of its food, indoor farms could enable the island nation to become more self-sufficient. Panasonic is selling the indoor farm’s produce under the brand name Veggie Life, and a three ounce bowl of greens goes for around $5 in grocery stores. They also sell their produce to local restaurants. Via Business Insider Images via Panasonic ( 1 , 2 )

Excerpt from: 
Singapore’s giant vertical farm grows 80 tons of vegetables every year

Amazing green-roofed school melts into the mountains of France

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Amazing green-roofed school melts into the mountains of France

In the 1960s, the Jean Moulin High School in Revin, France was artfully tucked into the town’s grass-covered hills. However, over the years, the old building began to fall apart due to neglect and severe weather. When the town decided to renovate the damaged structure they called upon Duncan Lewis Scape Architecture , who retained the school’s strong connection to nature with a series of tiered “forest balconies.” Although officials were open to various ideas for a new building, they were adamant that the design retain the strong symbiotic relationship between the manmade structure and its natural environment. However, the state of the original building was so bad that renovating the complex would have been a massive operation, especially considering the asbestos that was used in its construction. Accordingly, the project began by demolishing and rebuilding the entire complex, all while trying to maintain minimal impact on school activities. Related: Gorgeous Green-Roofed Marcel Sembat School Completed in France The volume of the school is divided into lateral rows made up of low-rise terraces that are gradually stepped into the mountain’s natural topography, covered in a dense vegetation of tall trees, bushes and ‘rock chaos’. Built onto the mountain bedrock, the building’s layout stretches out to the crest of the plateau, which overlooks the river below. The classrooms are located below the green terraced “strips” and, thanks to strategic orientation and an abundance of windows, have tons of natural light as well as beautiful panoramic views of the green valley below. The lowest part of the complex has a sports area with a running track, a smart gym, and indoor basketball, volleyball and handball court. On the interior, the school’s “Agora” also follows the natural slope of the site, with ramps on either side that lead to the classrooms and workshops. “La Place” is a community area used for breaks and recreation. According to the architects, the school’s “panoptical” design not connects it to its surroundings, but also serves as a strategic measure to help monitor the student body more efficiently. + Duncan Lewis Scape Architecture Via Archdaily Images via Duncan Lewis, Matthieu Tregoat, and Cyrille Weiner

Read the original post: 
Amazing green-roofed school melts into the mountains of France

This Tower of Biodiversity is designed to spread seeds throughout Paris

November 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This Tower of Biodiversity is designed to spread seeds throughout Paris

Maison Edouard François took a new approach to their tower design. When planning cities, many in France have worried buildings will be too high, according to the firm, but they wanted to demonstrate the potential of tall buildings with a design that disperses seeds to encourage greater biodiversity. The tower is largely able to accomplish the feat due to its 50 meter, or 164 foot, height. Related: Paris allows anyone to plant an urban garden In their building description, Maison Edouard François says, “Covered with plants from wild natural areas, our tower is a tool for seeding: it allows the wind to spread class one purebred seeds into the urban environment. Its height is a key element for its capacity to regenerate urban biodiversity.” Titanium cladding also contributes to the unique tower design. The recyclable cladding is green, and is intended to look almost like moss. Maison Edouard François said the distinctive material affords a fluctuating look to the tower through moiré patterns, and “distills a ‘green’ aura to the Parisian cityscape.” Stainless steel netting covers the 16-story tower over the cladding, granting creeping plants an opportunity to thrive all the way up the building sides. When wind sweeps through the area, it will carry seeds from the plants out into Paris . There’s even a garden on the roof. Inside, exposed concrete contrasts with colorful art and lighting. The M6B2 Tower of Biodiversity stands next to smaller structures with zinc and aluminum facades and roof gardens. Maison Edouard François said when pedestrians stroll among the buildings, they’ll feel as if they’ve stepped outside the city into a garden. + Maison Edouard François Via Dezeen Images via Pierre L’Excellent

View post:
This Tower of Biodiversity is designed to spread seeds throughout Paris

O-House vertical garden doubles as a sun screen in Vietnam

November 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on O-House vertical garden doubles as a sun screen in Vietnam

A retired Vietnamese couple commissioned a quiet home with a small garden in which they can spend their free time. The architects responded with a design that prioritizes natural light , introducing a small garden to the back of the house where the couple can grow their own vegetables . This green area includes concrete planters of varying sizes, giving an interesting rhythm to the space. The “green fence” that covers the street-facing facade reduces noise pollution , solar radiation and improves indoor air quality. Related: Striking 13-foot-wide family home in Vietnam looks like a jungle in the city The most attractive area in the house includes the living room, dining room and a large void, the last of which establishes visual connections throughout the interior and facilitates natural ventilation . + LVHQ Via Architizer

Excerpt from: 
O-House vertical garden doubles as a sun screen in Vietnam

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1154 access attempts in the last 7 days.