Timber Chimney House gives farmhouse vernacular a modern twist

April 3, 2017 by  
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Although the Chimney House is a thoroughly contemporary design, the home’s aesthetic pays homage to the area’s traditional farmhouse vernacular . Designed by Dekleva Gregoric Architects , the home in Logatec, Slovenia is clad in dark timber panels and it features a striking gabled roof . However, the heart of the design is a massive chimney that runs from the bottom floor to the roof, defining the home’s playful shape. The Chimney House is located on the edge of town and it’s designed to blend into the rustic area. The home is clad in traditional dark larch boards , and it draws inspiration from the traditional barns found throughout the area. However, the home’s monolithic shape gives it a strong modern character. Related: Three-storey chimneys funnel geothermal energy into award-winning Perth home A massive chimney with a wooden stove is located in the kitchen, which holds court as the center of the homeowners’ private and social life. The position of the chimney was central to the design, determining the layout of the interior spaces. The interior design is also a mix of old and new, with oiled oak paneling used for almost all of the surfaces. The slanted ceilings , which are covered in reinforced concrete, enhance the playful shape of the home. The large chimney reaches up through the interior to “break open” a linear skylight that runs the length of the roof’s apex, allowing optimal natural light to flood the home. + Dekleva Gregoric Architects Photography by Flavio Coddou

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Timber Chimney House gives farmhouse vernacular a modern twist

Vernacular-inspired Delaware home built with recycled barn wood

August 31, 2016 by  
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The house, called Rural Loft, is located in an area of Delaware dominated by agriculture . It channels the local vernacular and references the form and materiality of barns. In fact, its exterior cladding was made using wood reclaimed from an agricultural structure planned to be demolished. Related: Old Belgian barn is transformed into a gorgeous contemporary home The interior spaces are organized around a central core with bathrooms, storage spaces and utilities. Sliding doors open onto two exterior decks and blur the line between inside and outside. A rain screen made from reclaimed barn wood siding facilitates air circulation and keeps the house well ventilated. + DIGSAU Via Dezeen Photos by Todd Mason

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Vernacular-inspired Delaware home built with recycled barn wood

Award-winning rammed earth home in Spain halves normal CO2 emissions

July 29, 2016 by  
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Presented as a “contemporary vernacular 21st century house,” Castellarnau’s design incorporates a variety of energy and resource-saving strategies. The stone, earth, and straw used in construction comprises 80 percent of the home’s overall weight, and all building materials, including wood, sheep’s wool and hydraulic lime, were sourced from within a 150 kilometer radius. In addition to supporting local suppliers, this drastically reduces the distance materials have to travel, and thereby the amount of greenhouse gas emissions sent billowing into the atmosphere. In a recent press release, Castellernau reported that the lifecycle analysis of this particular design shows a 50 percent reduction in overall emissions. Related: Dome-shaped Earth Bag House in Colombia keeps residents naturally cool Other notable features include thermo-insulating blinds, thermal accumulator clay plastering, and a biomass boiler, all of which are designed to make the most of natural resources available to the client. Strategically-placed windows maximize the amount of natural light reaching the interior, further reducing energy use, and a cistern collects rainwater for reuse. In her quest to research local, traditional architecture over the last decade, the architect has refined old techniques and developed new ones, many of which she has tested on her own home. She is currently working on two more earth architecture projects in Spain, and we are immensely excited to see the results. + Edra Arquitectura Images via Doble Studio

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Award-winning rammed earth home in Spain halves normal CO2 emissions

Pokmon Go players are rescuing real animals in the wild

July 29, 2016 by  
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Unless you’ve been living under a Geodude , you’ve probably seen, heard, or read something about Pokémon Go. But did you know some gamers are actually rescuing real animals as they play? Whilst on a hunt for Dratini, Olivia Case rescued a juvenile bat and brought it to the care of Cornell Animal Hospital in Ithica, New York . Since the mobile game was released on July 6th, Cornell Animal Hospital has received a screech owl, rabbits, an opossum, and a baby squirrel from active Pokémon Go players. You may have noticed crowds of people swarming towards the location of a rare Pokémon . You may have been a victim of distracted walking or you may have lost ten pounds . If you are a kind and serendipitous gamer on a quest to catch ’em all, you may have even protected real wildlife . “The whole ‘Gotta Catch ‘Em All,’ it’s great!” says Victoria Campbell, owner of Wild Things Sanctuary in Ithaca, which specializes in bat rehabilitation. “If you find a little bat when you’re searching for a Zubat, don’t freak out!” says Campbell. Campbell assisted in the care of the baby bat, fittingly named Zubat, thanks to the magic of Pokémon. Beyond calling for animal rescue professionals, those who discover an animal with nearly no HP left may keep them safe by covering them with a box and a sliding piece of cardboard beneath. Related: Macaon Transforms Aluminum Cans Into Cartoon, Video Game, and Superhero Characters Pokémon Go has come to the rescue of animals beyond Ithaca. In relatively nearby Rochester, a man desperate to fill his Pokédex stumbled upon eight ducklings stuck in a storm drain; his swift reporting of the distressed ducks resulted in their rescue. In South Houston , two fellow adventurers of digital Kanto saved several hamsters and baby mice, abandoned in a cage in a park. Pokémon Go seems to be facilitating some real interactions with nature, exercise and exploration, even if it is still defined by an omniscient screen. One wonders whether Pokémon Go has potential to protect endangered species suffering under ecological collapse. Perhaps if Pokémon Go had existed in the early 20th century, the passenger pidgey may still be with us. Via Atlas Obscura

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Pokmon Go players are rescuing real animals in the wild

Otherworldly Yaroof installation by Aljoud Lootah celebrates Dubai’s fishing heritage

November 2, 2015 by  
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Traditional Yaroof shore fishermen use beach seine netting made of strong mesh, mainly to catch small fish. Fishermen wade into the sea from the shore, holding the edge of the net. Inspired by this process, Aljoud Lootah designed his installation using four octagon frames, each with patterns of nylon ropes that reference the structure of a fishing net . Arabesque motifs were also used as inspiration for the patterns, which create curves using straight lines. Related: Aljoud Lootah’s Oru origami furniture is made from teak, felt and copper The installation was placed on the beach as a kind of shelter, providing shade for beach goers and promoting this year’s Dubai Design Week, which aims to diversify and develop the design industry in the city. + Aljoud Lootah + Dubai Design Week Via Cool Hunting Photos via Aljoud Lootah

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Otherworldly Yaroof installation by Aljoud Lootah celebrates Dubai’s fishing heritage

NASA releases new images of mysterious 8,000-year-old earthworks in Kazakhstan

November 2, 2015 by  
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Space buffs are forever stunned and amazed by the things NASA finds out in the universe, but some days, it’s the discoveries the agency reveals here on Earth that are the most fascinating. NASA has released photos of some curious formations in the ground in Kazakhstan , and even the space agency’s scientists aren’t really sure what the patterns are all about. The formations, known as the Steppe Geoglyphs, are thought to be around 8,000 years old and NASA hopes that releasing the images will help unlock the mystery behind the strange patterns. Read the rest of NASA releases new images of mysterious 8,000-year-old earthworks in Kazakhstan

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NASA releases new images of mysterious 8,000-year-old earthworks in Kazakhstan

Japanese scientists develop glass almost as sturdy as steel

November 2, 2015 by  
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Researchers in Japan believe they’ve found a way to create glass that is nearly as strong as steel . A material so resistant to shattering has thousands of applications, and those behind the science are hopeful they can start production soon. So, just how did they find an answer to every butter-fingered smartphone user’s dream? Read the rest of Japanese scientists develop glass almost as sturdy as steel

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Japanese scientists develop glass almost as sturdy as steel

Apostrophy’s gorgeous Bangkok townhouse boasts a 25-foot vertical garden

November 2, 2015 by  
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Apostrophy’s gorgeous Bangkok townhouse boasts a 25-foot vertical garden

Coniferous Clock Shows the Passing of Time With Browning Cedar Leaves

September 12, 2014 by  
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Japanese collective Bril has created a clock without ticking hands or numbers – instead, it marks the passage of time through browning of cedar leaves. Inspired by cedar boughs used in sake production, the Coniferous Clock consists of cedar branches tied together and clipped into a sphere. As the months go by the branches slowly turn brown to signal the passing of the year. Read the rest of Coniferous Clock Shows the Passing of Time With Browning Cedar Leaves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Bril clock , cedar design , Coniferous Clock , green clock , green design , Japanese design , Japanese vernacular , numberless clock , rice wine , vernacular design

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Coniferous Clock Shows the Passing of Time With Browning Cedar Leaves

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