12 scrumptious vegan slow-cooker soup recipes

December 31, 2016 by  
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There’s nothing that keeps the winter chill away as much as a hearty bowl of soup. Make that soup uber-healthy and super easy to make and you’ve got a winning combo. We’ve got 12 vegan soup recipes that you can make in a slow cooker – read on to check them all out.

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12 scrumptious vegan slow-cooker soup recipes

How to Eat Vegan at Disney World

December 19, 2016 by  
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A trip to the Disney theme parks isn’t usually synonymous with healthy eating. The Dove dark chocolate Mickey ears, deep-fried churros and Carnation Café creations don’t exactly scream conscious cuisine. As a vegan, a recent family trip to Disney…

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How to Eat Vegan at Disney World

This gluten free sweet potato miso will add some color to your day

December 11, 2016 by  
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These brilliant purple sweet potato noodles are more than just colorful: they’re healthy, delicious, vegan, and gluten free! This veggie-stuffed miso recipe is sure to be a hit with the whole family. Read on for the complete recipe.

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10 Unexpected new recipes that feature delicious winter vegetables

November 12, 2016 by  
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For many people, the idea of eating seasonally is a brilliant idea. That is until the colder months roll along. After all, there’s a spectacular amount of produce available to be played with from early spring to mid autumn, but once Halloween passes, the culinary palette seems to be comprised of a few scant offerings. This couldn’t be further from the truth! Root vegetables, brassicas, winter greens, and hard-fleshed fruit can be fabulous when paired the right way. Below are a few ideas for using seasonal produce to its greatest potential. Cabbage and Ramen Noodle Salad This salad may sound a bit weird, but the flavors all combine gorgeously into a fun, crunchy autumn/winter dish. 1 head of napa cabbage, shredded finely 1 bunch of green onions, sliced 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 1 package of ramen noodles, broken up into small pieces 1 cup slivered almonds 1/4 cup cider vinegar 3/4 cup vegetable oil 2-3 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari Blend the cabbage and green onions in a large bowl, and refrigerate until ready to serve. In a large skillet, melt the butter or margarine on medium-high heat, and toss in the ramen noodles and almonds. Use a spatula to turn this mixture often, and remove your pan from the heat once the majority of it has been browned. Set aside. For the dressing, heat the vinegar, oil, sugar, and soy sauce in a small pot on medium-high heat. Allow it to boil for about a minute, then set aside to allow it to cool for a bit. Combine the cabbage and ramen-nut mixture with a set of salad tongs, and mix the dressing into it just before serving so it doesn’t get soggy. Root Veggie Chips Take a quick jaunt over to Amy’s Cooking Adventures for an incredible tutorial on how to make perfect root vegetable chips . These are great alternatives to chips for scooping up your favorite dips, and if you use veggies like watermelon radish, heirloom carrots, and a bunch of different beets, you’ll have a veritable rainbow of snacks to nibble. I like to spice mine up with cumin, paprika, garlic powder, and onion salt, but they’re delightful plain as well. Stems and Roots Slaw You can use whatever root vegetables you have in the house for this, and adapt it to your own tastes. I like to add in grated apple on occasion, or switch out the lemon juice with orange instead. Sometimes I’ll even throw in toasted nuts and dried cranberries. Be creative! 2 carrots (different colors, if available), julienned 1 bulb fennel, shredded 2 radishes (if you can get 2 different colors, all the better), grated or julienned 1 golden beet, grated 2 broccoli stems, peeled and julienned 1/2 small celeriac root , peeled and julienned 1/2 red onion, peeled and sliced thinly 1 cup plain yogurt (dairy or soy) 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon lemon juice Salt and pepper Combine all the shredded vegetables into a large bowl. Blend the yogurt , lemon juice, and mustard together and pour over the vegetables, tossing the lot to combine it. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Refrigerate for 30 minutes before serving. Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Now, this isn’t so much a recipe as a basic idea that you can add to with whatever suits your own whims. I usually use one sweet potato per person eating, and fill with a variety of different bits, depending on what I have in the house. Preheat your oven to 400 F. Poke a few holes in your sweet potatoes , and bake for 1 hour or until soft and tender. You can also cook your potatoes in the microwave for 10 to 15 minutes or until soft, but since I haven’t had a microwave in over a decade, I can’t vouch for this method. When the sweet potatoes are cooked,  slice a piece off the top lengthwise, and scoop out the flesh so you have a nice big bowl to fill up. At this point, I generally use a bit of what I’ve scooped out as part of the filling that’ll go back in (the rest goes into soups and such). I like to create a spicy, smoky black bean veggie chili, into which I pop some of the sweet potato and a bit of cooked quinoa. That gets ladled into the potato shells, topped with cubed avocado, corn salsa, and a dollop of plain yogurt. Tuscan Kale and White Bean Soup This is a great warming dish for a chilly day, and it’s packed with iron and protein. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup yellow onion, diced 4 large garlic cloves, chopped coarsely 4 cups vegetable or onion broth/stock 1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped finely 4 cups chopped kale 1 large can Italian-style diced tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste Salt, pepper 2 large carrots, peeled and diced 1 large can of white cannellini beans, drained and rinsed (use white kidney beans if cannellinis aren’t available) Sautee the onion in the olive oil until it softens, and then add in the garlic. Cook for an additional minute or so, but don’t allow the garlic to brown. All all remaining ingredients except the beans, cover with a lid, and cook on medium heat for 8-10 minutes. Add in the beans, stir thoroughly, and season with the salt and pepper to taste. I generally deglaze the onions with a bit of wine before adding in the veggies, and I tend to add a kick of spice with some cayenne pepper and smoked paprika, but do what you like to make this soup your own. Squash and Winter Greens Salad I don’t have a recipe for this per se, as it depends on many variables, so feel free to adapt it however you like. To make this, I grab an acorn or delicata squash, slice it into half-moons, remove the peel, drizzle it with olive oil and salt, and roast it at 425 F for about 20 minutes, or until it’s browning and fork-tender. Set that aside to cool. In a large bowl, mix together whichever winter greens you like best (I like spinach, sliced endives, and arugula that I’ve grown on my windowsill, but massaged kale works well too), nuts of your choice (try sunflower seeds or walnut pieces), and any other produce you think would work well in here. I’m fond of adding sliced of pears, but if you prefer a salad that’s less sweet, you can use halved cooked fingerling potatoes, shredded beets, etc. For the dressing, whisk together a simple vinaigrette with a couple of tablespoons each of lemon juice and vinegar, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, and 1 teaspoon honey or agave syrup. Toss the greens together and top with the squash. If you’re not vegan, feel free to add some crumbled feta or chèvre on top for a lovely, creamy note. Roasted Purple Potato and Beet Tarte Tatin This gorgeous, gluten-free dish is as delicious as it is colorful. It’s perfect for a special occasion brunch, or even a light supper with a side salad and bowl of soup. The recipe can be found on the Canelle etVanille website, and is absolutely worth trying out as soon as you can. Sweet and Sour Cauliflower Say that out loud a couple of times and just try to stop yourself from smiling. This is fabulous with rice, or even on its own as an appetizer or light lunch. 1 small head of cauliflower, cut into florets 1 tablespoon flaxseed meal 2 tablespoons water 1/3 cup water 1/3 cup corn starch 1/4 cup flour 1 teaspoon oil Oil for frying Mix all of the ingredients together and let sit for a few minutes to form a batter. Its consistency should be that of a thick pancake batter, but if you feel that it’s too gummy, add a bit more water. Heat approximately 1/2 a cup of oil in a large skillet until it spits when a water droplet is flicked at it. Dip each cauliflower floret into to batter, and then fry in the oil until browned and crispy. Drain on some paper towels or newspaper. For the sauce: 4 garlic cloves, minced 5 or 6 green onions, sliced thinly 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 tablespoons of soy sauce or tamari 2 tablespoons white or rice vinegar The zest and juice of 1 orange 1/4 teaspoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon corn starch Saute garlic in a bit of oil for a minute or so, then add the green onions, and both the orange zest and juice. Cook for another minute or so, and then add in the rest of the ingredients. Whisk this together as it comes to a boil, and then remove it from the heat. Toss your cauliflower nuggets into this sauce, ensure that they’re coated well, and then serve immediately. Perfect Brussels Sprouts Most people cringe at the thought of eating these mini brassicas, but they’re one of my all-time favourite veggies. The key is to roast them in order to bring out their natural sweetness. 1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon black pepper Preheat your oven to 400 F. Use a sharp knife to cut the stem ends off the Brussels sprouts, and be sure to remove any loose or yellowed outer leaves. Cut the larger sprouts in half lengthwise, and then toss the lot in a large bowl with olive oil, salt, garlic powder, and pepper. Pour these into a shallow baking dish or baking pan and roast for about 40 minutes, until the outsides are crunchy and the insides are slurpy-soft. Sprinkle with a bit more salt (if desired) and serve hot. Pear, Fig, and Goat Cheese Pizza A vegan version of this can be created by using a sour cashew “cheese” in lieu of chèvre.   1 lb pizza dough 1/4 to 1/3 cup fig jam 1 large bosc pear, sliced thinly 1/3 cup goat cheese (soft chevre), or soft cashew cheese Additional cheese (dairy or vegan) of your choice. (I like to dot this pizza with bits of gorgonzola, but it’s also lovely with fontina, gruyere, or even mozzarella Daiya shreds) Slices of prosciutto (if you eat meat and happen to like it) Preheat oven to 450 F. Oil a round cookie sheet, and then place a couple of pieces of parchment onto it. Oil that too. Soften the fig jam by placing the jar in warm water for 5-10 minutes, and then spread the jam over the crust, leaving a 1-inch border, since it’ll ooze as it warms up. Top with pear slices, and crumble the goat cheese around fairly evenly. If you’re using prosciutto, now’s the time to lay it on, and then sprinkle with any remaining cheese, if desired. Bake for 12-15 minutes until the edges of the crust are brown, and the cheese is bubbly. Shake the pizza free from the sheet onto a wire cooling rack, let it sit until it’s less likely to burn your face off from the inside, then place upon a large cutting board, slice up, and serve. All images via  Shutterstock

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10 Unexpected new recipes that feature delicious winter vegetables

HOW TO: Make hearty and healthy roasted butternut squash with sage

October 30, 2016 by  
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If you’re looking for a healthy and hearty dish to warm you up this fall, you’ll love this recipe for roasted butternut squash with sage. Packed with vitamins A and C as well as essential minerals, butternut squash is a powerhouse vegetable that’s adored by both kids and adults for its naturally sweet taste. Click through to learn how to whip up this crowd-pleasing caramelized dish in just a few easy steps.

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HOW TO: Make hearty and healthy roasted butternut squash with sage

How to cook a whole pumpkin (seeds, guts and all)

October 12, 2016 by  
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® Flickr Amy Stephenson 1. Roasted Pumpkin Seeds Fresh, roasted pumpkin seeds hot from the oven are a simple seasonal treat. First, clean out a pumpkin and separate the seeds from the guts. Set aside the guts to use in another recipe, such as pumpkin bread or to combine with the pumpkin flesh for a soup. Rinse the seeds and pat them dry. Sprinkle them on an oiled baking sheet or baking dish and drizzle with olive oil. Roast the seeds in a 325 degree oven for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally to ensure the seeds don’t stick together or burn. Because the size of pumpkin seeds can vary, keep adding 5 minutes of cooking time until the seeds are evenly toasted a light brown and have become crisp – taste test one to check. Once you remove the pan from the oven, sprinkle the seeds with a generous pinch of flaked sea salt and enjoy. Image via Pixabay 2. Pumpkin Scrap Stock If you aren’t already making your own vegetable stock with food scraps, now is a great time to start. It’s as simple as grabbing a sturdy gallon-sized storage bag and sticking it in your freezer. Every time you prep vegetables, simply toss the stems, roots, and leaves into your stock bag instead of the compost. Great additions include kale stems , onion tops, radish greens, celery leaves, cabbage cores, and slightly mushy or brown vegetables that don’t have mold on them. You can also add pumpkin ends, guts, and the skin, which has plenty of flesh clinging to it. Once your stock bag is full, add it to a pot with about 64 ounces of water and simmer over low heat for about 2 hours. Strain the stock through a wire mesh strainer or through cheesecloth and salt to taste. You can freeze the stock or use it immediately as a base for a delicious vegan or vegetarian soup or stew. Simply compost the boiled scraps you’ve strained out. Related: 10 healthy, energizing clean eating Thanksgiving recipes ® Flickr James Leow 3. Pumpkin Shake Craving a delicious, creamy, seasonal breakfast treat? Our recipe for Pumpkin Shakes is just the ticket. To modify this recipe to use the whole pumpkin, simply use fresh pumpkin instead of canned. When you prep the pumpkin flesh for baking, make sure to add the bright orange pulp of the pumpkin, which will also to add moisture. Once the pumpkin is baked soft, puree it and either use immediately or freeze for later use. To modify our Pumpkin Shake recipe, you’ll blend together 1 cup coconut milk (or regular milk), 1 frozen banana, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 2 tablespoons honey, and one cup of the pureed pumpkin and pulp. Image via Public Domain 4. Pumpkin Seed Trail Mix Next time you create a Jack ‘O Lantern or prep a pumpkin to bake, don’t throw away the innards. Separate the pulp from the seeds and set them aside to add to some delectable vegan pumpkin donuts . Rinse the seeds and pat them dry on a towel – you’ll roast them and use them in a sweet-and-savory trail mix perfect for snacks on a crisp fall hike. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. On a large baking sheet sprayed with oil, sprinkle the raw, clean and paper towel-blotted seeds of one pumpkin. Drizzle with olive oil and a pinch of sea salt flakes. Bake the seeds for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the sheet from the oven and add a selection of trail mix ingredients (mix up the ingredients if you like). Add 1/2 cup of coconut flakes, 1/3 cup of diced candied ginger, 1/2 cup of dried cranberries, and a generous sprinkle of powdered cardamom. Bake for another 12 minutes until toasted and fragrant, stirring occasionally to ensure the coconut flakes don’t get burnt. Allow the trail mix to cool before packing it into jars or bags. Related: DIY Halloween: Tasty Treats and Pumpkin Carving Ideas ®Emily Peckenham for Inhabitat 5. Pumpkin Soup in a Shell If you really want to use the whole pumpkin, there’s no better way than eating a savory vegetarian soup made from fresh pumpkin, served in its own pumpkin shell, and topped with roasted seeds from the very same pumpkin. This fun presentation is perfect for a fall dinner party or celebration, and the pumpkin shell also serves as an impromptu table centerpiece – you could also place it on a platter surrounded by fresh biscuits and rosemary sprigs, or seasonal fruit like grapes and figs. To make your pumpkin soup even tastier, roast the guts along with the flesh and puree it all together for a nutritionally dense dinner treat. Follow our complete tutorial here for details on everything from preparing the pumpkin shell to simmering a simple, savory soup to put inside. At the end of the meal, why not compost the pumpkin skin and shell to complete the cycle? ® Pixabay 6. Compost Pumpkin Scraps Last but not least, what do you do with the bits of the pumpkin you really aren’t going to use? Even if you make good use of the seeds, the flesh, and the guts, there are some bits that really aren’t edible, such as the stems and the skin. If you toss your pumpkin skin in the trash, it will eventually end up at a landfill where the sheer amount of trash means it won’t decompose properly, contributing to increased greenhouse gases and overfilled trash dumps. Composting the scraps with other organic matter speeds up the decomposition process instead, and well-made compost can be used again to grow and enrich new crops. What if you don’t live in a rural area where you can make your own compost and use it in a garden? No problem – even urban dwellers can create a small compost bin in their kitchens. If you’re worried about odor, follow our tutorial for creating an urban freezer compost bin. Once its full, you can drop it into a city compost bin or community garden, or arrange for pickup by an urban composting company.

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How to cook a whole pumpkin (seeds, guts and all)

Antarctica’s only luxury camp for tourists is 100% powered by wind and solar

October 12, 2016 by  
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The camp’s dome cabins, originally designed by Ryan Ashworth, were recently refurbished after being worn down by the harsh Antarctic conditions. Guests pay around $70,000 per person for a seven, eight, or eleven day adventure , during which they’ll spend the nights cozied up in one of the camp’s igloo-shaped cabins, situated on a 200-foot ice fall at the edge of the Shirmacher Oasis in Queen Maud Land, near the Antarctic coast closest to Cape Town, South Africa. Constructed from sturdy fiberglass, each of the six private cabins includes sleeping accommodations, a desk, and private wash area with a composting toilet. Because there is no plumbing, a composting toilet allows the camp operators to pack out all human waste at the end of each adventure, further reducing its ecological impact. Related: Why the discovery of an enormous subglacial lake in Antarctica is especially exciting One of the camp’s communal cabins holds a lush lounge space filled with comfortable couches, occasional tables, and a wood-burning stove for heat. A second shared pod is home to the dining room, where a large round table invites all of the camp’s guest to eat (and drink) together. Finally, a shower room rounds out the camp. Restricting shower facilities to one pod, rather than private showers in each cabin, helps reduce water consumption and is more energy efficient, both important factors for a temporary, remote camp run completely by renewable energy. On top of gourmet meals, sightseeing, and making new friends, the adventure also includes face time with some of the local wildlife, the majestic Emperor penguins living a 2.5-hour flight west of the camp. Additionally, visitors embark on a journey to the geographic South Pole , which requires a seven-hour flight (stopping once to refuel). Guests also spend their days climbing mountains, checking out blue ice caves, and taking in the expansive views while bundled up in expedition-grade gear (which, by the way, visitors must supply for themselves). Camp Whichaway was founded by a trio of adventure lovers, who “wondered why only scientists and the odd polar explorer ever got to see the real Antarctica,” according to the back story on their website. Founder Patrick Woodhead, who led the first east-to-west traverse of Antarctica in 2002, was stuck in a tent waiting out a brutal storm in 2006 with his pals when they devised a plan for a luxury eco camp that would let a few more visitors experience the awe-inspiring beauty and devastating climate of the remote continent. Camp Whichaway opened shortly thereafter, offering a unique getaway for family trips, proposals and weddings, or the ultimate adventure quest for anyone who can afford to embark into the wildest place on Earth. + Camp Whichaway Via Wallpaper Images via Camp Whichaway

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Antarctica’s only luxury camp for tourists is 100% powered by wind and solar

Cucamelons are the most adorable fruit you never knew existed

August 24, 2016 by  
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®Flickr/ David Edwards The cucamelon,  Melothria scabra , is similar to a cucumber with a crisp bite and an aromatic, citrusy flavor. Its petite striped appearance lends it a number of alternative nicknames, from ” Sandia de Raton” (” Mouse Melon”) to “Mexican Sour Gherkin.” Image via Underwood Gardens Can’t find cucamelons at your farmer’s market? While August is probably too late in the summer to start growing your own (unless you live in Hawaii or the very warmest parts of the Southern US), you can bookmark these green cuties in your favorite seed catalog and look forward to starting the seedlings early next spring . Cucamelons are reputedly easy to grow and even if your garden consists of containers on a balcony, you can still grow them up a trellis or inside a tomato cage. RELATED: 30 easy and delicious popsicle recipes While you might be tempted to Instagram them instead of cooking, you can slice up tiny cucamelons to make a refreshing, colorful radish salad. If you don’t want to slice up the adorable baby watermelons, you can also serve them whole as a garnish on a summer cocktail – try spearing a cucamelon on a swizzle stick and serving it with a refreshing mint julep. Image via Snaplant Cucamelon-Radish Salad Step One: Gather your ingredients You’ll need about 14-16 cucamelons, 5 radishes, rice vinegar, fresh dill, sea salt, and freshly ground pepper. Step Two: Slice and mix Slice the cucamelons lengthwise and add them to a salad bowl. Slice the radishes into thin rounds and mix in. Drizzle the salad with about 2 tablespoons of rice vinegar. Toss with a generous pinch of sea salt and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with fresh dill fronds and serve. Serves 4. RELATED: 6 super easy gardening projects to do this weekend Can’t find any cucamelons to cook with? Try one of these refreshing summer recipes made with watermelon or cucumber instead, and bring along to your next BBQ or picnic. Image via Pixabay Frozen Watermelon Smoothie Step One: Gather your ingredients You’ll need one small seedless watermelon, or about 4 cups of diced watermelon with seeds removed, 2 bananas, 1/2 cup coconut water, and 1 one-inch piece of peeled fresh ginger root. Step Two: Freeze Pop cubed watermelon in the freezer for a couple hours, or until completely frozen. You can prepare extra frozen watermelon in plastic bags or food storage containers so its ready to use later. Step Three: Blend Fire up your blender and drop in the coconut water and peeled ginger. Blend until the ginger is well chopped. Add the 2 bananas and blend. Finally, add the frozen watermelon and blend until creamy and smooth. Serve in a glass with a straw and enjoy! Serves 4. Image via Wikimedia Yogurt-Cucumber Dip Step One: Gather your ingredients You’ll need: 2 cups of Greek yogurt, 2 large cucumbers (or 4 small Persian cucumbers), 1 small clove garlic, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, juice of 1/2 lemon, and 2 tablespoons of fresh chopped dill. Step Two: Grate and dice If you’re using regular large grocery-store cucumbers, you’ll need to peel the thick, bitter skin off first. If you’re using thin-skinned Persian cucumbers, you can simply wash them and chop off the ends. Using a box grater, grate all of your cucumber into a bowl. Squeeze the grated cucumbers gently and drain off any excess water and juice. Finely dice the small clove of garlic. Step Three: Mix dip In a bowl, mix the two cups of Greek yogurt with the grated cucumber, diced garlic, juice of 1/2 lemon, and chopped dill. Add a generous pinch of sea salt and some ground black pepper and taste, adding more if desired. Let the dip sit in a covered dish in the refrigerator for an hour to allow the flavors to blend. Serve with crackers, pita chips, or freshly warmed baguette or pita bread.

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Cucamelons are the most adorable fruit you never knew existed

How Opera used 1,000 old floppy disks and other e-waste in their new Poland headquarters

August 24, 2016 by  
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Opera’s new headquarters are located in two prestigious townhouses in the heart of Wroclaw. The buildings-one built in the 19th century and the other dating back to 1913-are part of the city’s rich architectural heritage. The architects combined this historic narrative with the atmosphere of modern-day Wroclaw to create a design that references several city landmarks, but feels contemporary. Related: mode:lina architekci design a playful new restaurant for LIDL Poland The construction of Market Hall, Central Railway Station hall and Szczytnicki’s Park are referenced in the kitchenette , while the design of the meeting rooms is associated with IT and computers. The latter space features an integrated circuit, fans and decor made out of nearly 1,000 old floppy disks and over 200 keyboards. + mode:lina architekci Photos by Marcin Ratajczak , Maciej D?browski

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How Opera used 1,000 old floppy disks and other e-waste in their new Poland headquarters

Meatless burger that cooks, smells, and bleeds like beef previews in San Francisco

June 23, 2016 by  
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Impossible Foods has perfected a juicy, bleeding, meatless hamburger that mimics beef down to its distinct aroma – and they just debuted the revolutionary vegan patty in San Francisco. Engineered to evoke the taste, smell, and cooking reactions of beef, this food innovation could change family cookouts forever. Impossible Foods founder Patrick Brown told The Wall Street Journal , “The whole mission of this company is to make eating animals unnecessary. So, we don’t want our product to just be delicious, we want it to be as delicious as meat.” Now you can have a juicy, bleeding, meatless burger – and eat it, too. Impossible Foods hit the headlines last year for reaching over $108 million in investments , and the final total is estimated to be around $183 million today. A shining reputation helped Patrick Brown, co-founder of plant-based cheese company Kite Hill , attract investors – including Bill Gates – to his new endeavor. Research and development has been underway in an unassuming Silicon Valley laboratory for over five years, and the fruits, er, proteins of their labor are finally ready for the public. Related: Plant-based burger company receives huge $108 million investment San Francisco haunt Jardinière featured the plant-based patty in a pop-up event where it was topped with avocado, caramelized onion, vegan dijonnaise, and served on a potato bun. The burger itself is a product of sophisticated engineering. Coconut oil lends to the juiciness while it cooks (did we mention the patties are purchased raw and cooked up like traditional hamburgers?) and potato compounds create a familiar crisp when prepared. A molecule from honeydew melon creates the mouth-watering aroma akin to grilled meat. Impossible Foods doesn’t plan on stopping at a few, select pop-up events. Because beef production requires more resource input than the final product and is a main culprit in environmental devastation, Brown argues we need to find alternatives, and soon. The Impossible burger gives us an alternative that is both tasty and conscientious. + Impossible Foods Via San Francisco Eater Images via Impossible Foods

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Meatless burger that cooks, smells, and bleeds like beef previews in San Francisco

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