This Oaxacan oasis uses low-maintenance local materials

November 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This Oaxacan oasis uses low-maintenance local materials

On a paradisal plot between the Pacific Ocean and the Oaxacan mountain range, Mexican architecture firm  anonimous  has completed Casa Cova, a two-family vacation home with spectacular views of the ocean. Located in the tourist destination of Puerto Escondido, Mexico, the holiday home comprises two linear compounds — one for each family — that flank a shared swimming pool, communal living area, dining space and bar in the center. A system of parallel concrete walls enclose the compounds and help frame views of the water, while a palette of locally-sourced natural materials helps tie the architecture to the landscape.  Casa Cova features a U-shaped layout, with the private bedrooms located in the “arms” of the home. Each arm comprises three pavilions: a master suite with framed views of the  Pacific Ocean , two kids’ bedrooms with private bathrooms, and a hammock area. Wooden shutters divided into three parts fold back to completely open up the interior to the outdoors. The indoor/outdoor connection is further enhanced with a series of interlocking open courtyards and breaks in the parallel concrete walls that promote natural ventilation from the ocean.  The two private wings flank a large volume in the center that contains a multipurpose area and a linear  swimming pool . The central volume also contains service spaces such as the kitchen, laundry room and a machine room that are all strategically tucked away so as not to detract from views of the Pacific Ocean. Also, the building is elevated five feet off the ground to mitigate flooding.  Related: This glamping hideout in Bali is made entirely out of bamboo To integrate the building into the landscape, the architects lined the walls and ceilings with  locally-sourced  dried palm tree leaves, used Parota wood for furnishings and chose regional low-maintenance vegetation for landscaping. Long ‘palapa’ — a regional cover made from dried palm tree leaves — tops the roofs to provide shade and natural cooling. + anonimous Images via anonimous

Go here to read the rest: 
This Oaxacan oasis uses low-maintenance local materials

Denmark to cull millions of minks to prevent spread of mutant coronavirus

November 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Denmark to cull millions of minks to prevent spread of mutant coronavirus

The Danish government has announced plans to cull all of the minks in the country’s mink farms to reduce the risk of spreading the coronavirus to humans. On Wednesday, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said that the minks are transmitting a new form of the coronavirus to humans, a situation that could spiral out of control. According to Frederiksen, a coronavirus-mapping agency has detected a mutated virus in several patients. Twelve individuals in the northern part of the country were diagnosed with a mutant form of the coronavirus, which is believed to have been contracted from the minks. Related: 1 million minks culled in Spain, the Netherlands Denmark is among the leading countries in mink farming. Its minks are used to produce fur , which is supplied to other parts of the world. These animals have been found to be a cause for concern relating to the transmission of the virus. According to Health Minister Magnus Heunicke, about half of the 783 humans infected with the coronavirus in northern Denmark have links to the mink farms. “It is very, very serious,” Frederiksen said. “Thus, the mutated virus in minks can have devastating consequences worldwide.” The government is now estimating that about $785 million will be required to cull the 15 million minks in the country. According to Mogens Gensen, Denmark’s minister for food, 207 mink farms are now infected. This number is alarming, considering that by this time last month, 41 farms were infected . Further, the virus has began spreading throughout the western peninsula. To date, Denmark has registered 50,530 confirmed coronavirus cases and 729 deaths. It is feared that if the situation is not contained, the numbers may get worse. To avoid this, Denmark started culling millions of minks last month, and the same is expected to continue for some time. Via Huffington Post Image via Jo-Anne McArthur

Read the original:
Denmark to cull millions of minks to prevent spread of mutant coronavirus

This energy-efficient home in Spain has a rainwater-fed infinity pool

August 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This energy-efficient home in Spain has a rainwater-fed infinity pool

Find Casa Palerm on the beautiful Balearic island of Mallorca, located in the Spanish Mediterranean. The area is known for its lavish beach resorts, world-famous beaches, stunning limestone mountains and ancient ruins. This home in Spain designed by OHLAB is an example of an energy-efficient architectural design that doesn’t detract from its stunning surroundings. The house itself is an extension of an existing hotel in Lloret de Vistalegre, a region in the center of Mallorca that is rich with wide-open countrysides. Near the hotel’s property farmhouse, Casa Palerm functions as a smaller vacation home . Related: This is one of the only LEED Gold-certified hotels in Spain There is one compact, single level making up the house, which is topped with a pitched roof. The entire structure has a width of about six meters with low-cost beams and no columns. This layout not only favors cross-ventilation , natural lighting and thermoregulation of the interior but also provides a parallel layout to take full advantage of the property’s views. The stretching countryside, as well as the Tramuntana Mountains to the north, can be enjoyed from multiple spots in the house. The living/dining room opens up to a massive porch on both sides, providing excellent ventilation during favorable weather. This panoramic format is built intentionally to have cinematographic proportions of 2.66:1, invoking a feel of being inside an old movie theater. The windows here can be completely hidden in the facade to be opened or closed depending on the season. A wattle (cañizo) pergola on the ceiling expands on both sides to protect the terraces from the hot summer sun and to filter the light and shadows. These energy-efficient choices, paired with the discrete design, help integrate the home into its surrounding environment.  Low-maintenance, drought-resistant Mediterranean plants and deciduous trees make up the garden, providing natural shade and aesthetics. Rainwater is stored in the water-collecting tank under the terrace to be reused for the garden irrigation, toilet tanks and the infinity pool. Natural and local materials , such as the rustic local limestone for the mortar plastering, became essential tools during construction. The home also contains reused ceramic tiles for the roof, local mare stone, sepi wood and artisan cement for the floors and sinks. + OHLAB Photography by José Hevia via OHLAB

See original here:
This energy-efficient home in Spain has a rainwater-fed infinity pool

Apple Hotel gains a green-roofed wellness center in South Tyrol

August 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Apple Hotel gains a green-roofed wellness center in South Tyrol

Bolzano-based architecture practice noa* (network of architecture) has recently completed the latest stage of expansion for Apfelhotel (Apple Hotel), a nature-focused retreat tucked away in the village of Saltaus in northern Italy. The recently completed phase includes 18 new guest suites and a green-roofed wellness facility that serves as the hotel’s centerpiece. Covered with a layer of earth and plants, the curved spa appears to blend seamlessly into a grassy hillside on one side and opens up to views of the landscape and apple fields on the other. In 2014, noa* won a design competition to expand on Apfelhotel’s historic structure and, in 2016, completed the expansion of the grounds, a renovation of the main building and restaurant as well as the addition of the Apfelsauna (Apple Sauna). Earlier this year, the architects added a wellness facility and 18 new suites on the hotel’s east-facing side that have been carefully crafted to complement the rural landscape and the existing renovated farmhouse . The guest rooms are spread out across three floors in three independent buildings, each wrapped in a wooden rhombus-pattered facade that pays homage to the traditional vernacular while appearing distinctively contemporary.  Related: A historic hotel is sustainably revamped into a charming “alpine village” getaway The new wellness facility — known as the Brunnenhaus (Water Well House) — forms the “green heart” of the hotel campus. The entrance to the green-roofed spa was built from a curved, semi-exposed concrete shell embedded into a grassy hill and punctuated with a door fabricated from old timber. The interior houses an adults-only upper level with a sauna , lounge, relaxation room, Finnish spa with panoramic outdoor views, a cave-like steam bath and an adjacent terrace fitted with an outdoor shower.  “The entire Apfelhotel project reflects the nature and passion of its family-owners, whose aim is to make people feel truly at home, rather than like a hotel guest,” the architects explained. “Together with noa*, the architecture was created with a great sense of integrity towards this special place, which becomes a unit with nature, ties in with its history, and maintains its own identity through applied design — where occasionally, glimpses of the apple can be seen in the surrounding nature and design.” + noa* Photography by Alex Filz via noa*

Go here to read the rest:
Apple Hotel gains a green-roofed wellness center in South Tyrol

Solar-powered luxury home celebrates contemporary style at Lake Huron

July 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered luxury home celebrates contemporary style at Lake Huron

On the banks of Lake Huron in a remote Canadian town, South African architecture firm SAOTA completed a contemporary summer house that’s strikingly different from the region’s “cabin country” vernacular. Carefully sited to keep the design unobtrusive, the luxury residence maximizes connections to the outdoors with full-height glazing and a layout that optimizes lakeside views. Durable weather-resistant materials, energy-efficient systems and a 15-kW solar array help minimize the home’s environmental footprint to meet the project’s sustainability targets. Located about an hour’s drive from London, Ontario, the Lake Huron vacation home departs from the traditional, “somewhat conservative” homes that dot the lakeside with a contemporary design emphasizing clean lines, horizontal massing and a minimalist exterior palette featuring a ceramic-paneled system strong enough to withstand the extremes of the Canadian climate. Despite the home’s eye-catching appearance, the architects allowed the surrounding landscape to largely dictate the design; the building is set back on the property toward the street to preserve a natural bluff located between the lake and forest, while existing mature fir trees were retained to help screen the house from view. Related: SAOTA’s Benguela Cove design takes rooms with a view seriously “The way in which the building is largely obscured from the street and in turn screens views of the lake helps build suspense on arrival, only to satisfy the sense of anticipation via the large pivot door,” the architects explained. “An indoor/outdoor volume to the south anchors the building and maximizes the site’s lakeside views while allowing the living spaces to occupy the foregrounds.” Full-height glazing fills the home with natural light while extended roof eaves protect the interiors from solar glare. For optimum building performance, a commercial-grade automation system was installed to control and monitor the home’s functions while the 15-kW solar array that powers the home feeds surplus energy to the grid for credit and later use. In addition to an Ecoflo septic system, an underground stormwater system capable of handling a 100-year storm was installed onsite as well.  + SAOTA Images via SAOTA

View original post here:
Solar-powered luxury home celebrates contemporary style at Lake Huron

A modern vacation retreat is embedded into the rolling hills of southern Portugal

January 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A modern vacation retreat is embedded into the rolling hills of southern Portugal

Tucked into the rolling meadows of Southern Portugal’s Alentejo region, a beautiful 2,691-square-foot vacation home holds court in an idyllic area that is perfect for disconnecting from the hustle and bustle of city life. The Cercal House, designed by Lisbon-based studio Atelier Data , boasts a Mediterranean style that is embedded into the landscape in order to blend in seamlessly with the natural environment. One of the most complicated challenges for the architects was the site’s problematic topography. Located on land separated by a river, the dry terrain is sloped on each side. Taking this challenge to heart, the designers decided to use the slanted landscape to their advantage by implanting the structure into the landscape’s natural shape while reducing its impact on the land. Related: Atelier Data transforms an old horse stable into a simple but stunning home in Portugal Embedding the home into the landscape provided an  energy-efficient advantage to the home while also adding a solar orientation that would reduce the home’s energy use. Additionally, the site can capture the best views of the home’s expansive pastoral setting. Wanting to meld the design into this setting, the architects created a structure that mimicked a traditional gable-house silhouette, but they added a modern touch in the form of four square cut-outs on one side of the roof. These openings not only allow for a subtle connection to the landscape but also provide an abundance of natural light and air ventilation to flow throughout the home’s interior. Jutting out from the interior living space is a large, open-air patio with polished concrete floors, and this space frames the picture-perfect views. In fact, four open-air patios are located at each corner of the home, which has three bedrooms that are arranged in a square layout. Further connecting the home with its surroundings is a beautiful infinity pool built at land level. + Atelier Data Via Dwell Photography by Richard John Seymour via Atelier Data

More here:
A modern vacation retreat is embedded into the rolling hills of southern Portugal

Stunning Costa Rican beach home uses passive features to stay cool

October 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stunning Costa Rican beach home uses passive features to stay cool

Located mere steps away from idyllic white sand beaches on one side and a coconut grove on the other, this beach house designed by Studio Saxe is giving us major home envy. Situated on Costa Rica’s Pacific coastline, the spacious 3,250-square-foot Villa Akoya’s beautiful aesthetic hides several passive strategies designed to reduce the home’s energy use and impact on the environment. The breathtaking location serves as the principal inspiration for the design. Built using traditional cinder block construction, the one-story home was was raised off the ground to create a continuous sight line with the ocean views. This feature also helped reduce the footprint on the landscape . Related: Triangular beachfront home is a dreamy retreat buried in the earth The beach house’s dimensions are divided into four separate horizontal roof planes that slant slightly upward, covering each of the three bedrooms plus the main living area. This strategy creates distinct volumes within the structure. Additionally, the flat wooden roofs extend out over the exterior walls to create large overhang extensions that shade the interior while creating several indoor-outdoor living spaces around the exterior. The interior layout includes several spaces that are open to the exterior, creating a seamless connection between the indoors and outdoors. All of the bedrooms have their own outdoor spaces, and an all-glass wall in the living room slides completely open, leading to a wooden deck and a swimming pool . Concealed within the design are several passive features to create an energy-efficient beach house. The “elevated” roof lines create a natural system of air ventilation, cooling the home in the hot summer months. The abundance of windows and glass doors brighten the interior during the day, further reducing the need for electricity. The home also operates on solar-generated hot water and has a gray water system. + Studio Saxe Via Archdaily Photography by Andres Garcia Lachner via Studio Saxe

More here: 
Stunning Costa Rican beach home uses passive features to stay cool

Net-zero Sawmill House is 100% self sufficient in California’s high desert

June 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Net-zero Sawmill House is 100% self sufficient in California’s high desert

Building a comfortable self-sufficient dwelling is no easy task, especially when in a harsh climate. But when Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig was tapped to design an off-grid home in the high desert in California, the architects rose to the challenge and delivered an elegant, net-zero dwelling known as the Sawmill House. Located in Tehachapi, California, the Sawmill House serves as a family retreat that weathers the harsh climate with durable materials and sustainable strategies. Completed in 2014, the Sawmill House is named after the valley in which it resides—a scrubby and remote landscape that had been used for mining, ranching and logging. In a departure from the site’s past, the homeowners wanted a family retreat with minimal environmental disturbance that would “give back to the land, rather than take from it.” With that guiding principle in mind, Olson Kundig crafted a self-sustaining, net-zero  vacation home that maximized connections between the indoors and outdoors. Spread out across 4,200 square feet, the Sawmill House is built mainly of concrete blocks, steel and glass, materials chosen for their durability against the harsh and fire-prone landscape. The living space with a central hearth marks the heart of the off-grid home and features a stunning 12-by-26-foot window wall that completely retracts with a few turns of the wheel, opening up the interior to the outdoor patio . The three bedrooms are housed in the three wings that branch off from the central living space. The longer wing, which houses the master bedroom, also includes the kitchen and dining area. Related: Floating Olson Kundig home makes way for Washington wildlife “Tough as nails, Sawmill is made from durable materials that can withstand the harsh climate, where fires are a major hazard in summer and winters are extremely cold,” says Olson Kundig Architects. “The design approach was driven by a scavenger mentality, seeking always to do more with less, including using salvaged and recycled materials whenever possible.” The home is powered with a photovoltaic solar array and comes with backup propane and generator; water is supplied by an on-site well. + Olson Kundig Images by Gabe Border and Kevin Scott / Olson Kundig

See more here: 
Net-zero Sawmill House is 100% self sufficient in California’s high desert

A Michigan farmhouse is reborn as a beautiful modern vacation retreat

June 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A Michigan farmhouse is reborn as a beautiful modern vacation retreat

A city-dwelling family in need of rural respite reached out to Von Weise Associates to make their country escape a reality. In response, the Chicago-based architecture firm delivered a stunning modern getaway that fully embraces the rural vernacular with a sensitive renovation of an existing farmhouse and barn. Located in the southeast Michigan township of Sawyer near Lake Michigan, the Retreat House consists of a new single-family house and adjacent studio for the artistic couple. In designing the home’s layout, Von Weise Associates took cues from the layouts of traditional farms , where the different functions were typically located in different buildings. In much the same way, the retreat conceptually places the different living spaces — including the sleeping, cooking and work areas — into separate volumes. Anchoring the home is the kitchen , dining area and living space housed within the refurbished old barn with a striking gambrel roof and soaring arched ceilings. The light-filled great room opens up to an adjacent screened porch. The original farmhouse was gut- renovated into an artist’s painting studio and sleeping loft. Large windows and skylights flood the interiors with natural light, while the reflective whitewashed walls emphasize a bright and airy feel throughout. Modern and unfussy furnishings, natural timber and a rusty-red painted exterior help tie the building to its rustic past. Related: Solar-powered forever home is a modern take on the rustic farmhouse “All portions of the house have a close relationship to the ground, making the landscape a vital part of the program,” Von Weise Architects said. “The orientation of the house creates multiple outdoor living spaces, plus a gardening area. The landscape and the orientation of the structures set up layers of space that moves from the public way to privacy of the house. The most private space beyond the house embraces the expansive wooded site on three sides.” + Von Weise Associates Images by Steve Hall

See more here:
A Michigan farmhouse is reborn as a beautiful modern vacation retreat

Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs

May 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs

Inspired by 20th-century architect R. Buckminster Fuller , architect Pavlina Williams transformed a decrepit dome house in Palm Springs into a dreamy retreat that channels bohemian and mid-century modern vibes. Now available as a vacation rental on Boutique Homes , the Geodesic Dome House offers stunning desert views on a private five-acre lot. Keep reading for a peek inside. Pavlina  and her husband Carter worked on their passion project on weekends and completed the renovation in a year. The key to the redesign was opening up the interior to natural light; Pavlina ordered custom windows from Home Depot to create a band of glazing for panoramic views . For a more modern appearance, Pavlina and Carter ripped up the existing flooring to expose the structural slab, which they then polished. Related: Couple spent seven years handcrafting their dream geodesic home In contrast to its bohemian exterior, the interior is bright and airy with a mid-century modern aesthetic in homage to the movement’s impact on Palm Springs . When asked by Boutique Homes about her favorite part of the home, Pavlina replied, “The location and the views. It’s five acres — and you hardly see the neighbors. You’re in the middle of nowhere. I mean that in a good way. You have the windmills all around you, so it feels like this is the end of the road, like you are here on your own. I love the desert, I love the mountains. In my mind, it’s really all about what’s around it.” The three-bedroom, 2.5-bath home accommodates up to six guests with rates starting at $245 a night . + Geodesic Dome House Images via Boutique Homes

See the original post here:
Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2813 access attempts in the last 7 days.