Student invents computer program to help Bedouin villages build better homes

April 11, 2017 by  
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Architecture student Nof Nathansohn is on a mission to provide decent living solutions for the marginalized Bedouin communities scattered throughout Israel’s Negev desert region. For her thesis project, Nathansohn created a computer program called Home Made that lets communities design affordable, environmentally-friendly housing without the need for an architect. The Bedouin villages are unrecognized by the Israeli government, so the shanty-like structures are under constant threat of demolition. Nathansohn’s Home Made software would allow the communities to build homes that are not only affordable and green , but easily assembled and disassembled. Related: Smart architecture app lets you turn almost anything into a digital stencil A major feature of the home-design application is that it is extremely user friendly. The software is designed to guide the user at every stage of the design process, from the initial design to the final construction. Users can choose from four different designs platforms with a variety of layouts. Each platform is designed according to different parameters such as sun direction, size and height, available materials, local topography, cost, etc. Although created for the Bedouin communities, the program enables the design and construction of low cost, green energy temporary housing easy for any location, under almost any circumstance. The flexibility offered by the application not only lets families construct a personalized living space, but can be used to create thriving villages as well. In fact, Nathansohn tested the application on the unrecognized village of Al-Sara, near the town Arad. She designed multiple structures for the village based on their current size as well as growth expectancy. She even designed a community center for the local children. + Nof Nathansohn

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Student invents computer program to help Bedouin villages build better homes

Glowing cardboard pavilion pops up in a Gothic courtyard in Valencia

April 11, 2017 by  
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Spanish art collective Pink Intruder just installed a glowing cardboard building called Renaixement inside a beautiful Gothic cloister in Valencia. The golden cube features a mosaic facade made out of an intricate cardboard latticework , and it’s illuminated from within by lighting studio RADIANTE. The ornate structure made its debut at the 2016 Burning Man , but it was such a hit that the artists decided to bring it back home and rebuild it in the Gothic cloister of Valencia’s Centre del Carmen Museum. The location is fitting since the pavilion design was inspired by the creative geometric and sculptural techniques used in the city’s famed Fallas festival . Related: Pink Intruder Unveils Gorgeous Pixelated Cardboard Pavilion in Valencia, Spain The structure’s medieval-style facade is made out of cardboard pieces and molds used by a traditional Fallas guild. The structure was built over a wooden mosaic floor made up of more than 25,000 pieces assembled by social collectives, making the artwork a communal effort. The glowing tubes integrated into the cardboard frame give the ornate cube an intimate and spiritual atmosphere at night. + Pink Intruder Photography by Noel Arraiz

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Glowing cardboard pavilion pops up in a Gothic courtyard in Valencia

Beautiful cedar-covered pavilion is a poetic rest stop in the English countryside

September 15, 2016 by  
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Commissioned by Surrey Hills Arts and the Mittal Foundation , Perspectives was created as one of many sculptural rest stops along a scenic walking path on the Hills of Surrey, south of London. The organic pavilion took inspiration from the words and messages etched into public places, such as on trees and benches. Giles Miller collected those messages, poetry, and other writings from local residents and transferred them onto the cedar shingles that clad the steel-framed structure. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London The shingles were installed by hand at different angles and overlap to emphasize the pavilion’s rounded shape. “At its core, the shingles overlap and the sculpture functions architecturally to protect and shield the user from the elements, but at its mouth the surface flattens and evocatively opens out in dissipation as the shingles appear to fly out towards the waiting valley,” write the studio. The cedar elements will develop a white patina over time. + Giles Miller Studio Via Dezeen Images by Richard Chivers and John Miller

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Beautiful cedar-covered pavilion is a poetic rest stop in the English countryside

L’Oral’s wearable patch changes color to warn against skin cancer

June 3, 2016 by  
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When most of us hear the name L’Oréal, we think of makeup and hair products, not tech innovation. That may soon be changing . Many don’t realize it, but the cosmetics giant has been pouring its efforts in recent years into celebrating and supporting women in science and running its very own technology incubator. Now, those efforts seem to be coming to fruition as the company unveils its first wearable device , a skin patch designed to help prevent cancer. Named ” My UV Patch ,” the device is a wearable skin patch just a few centimeters in size and half the thickness of a human hair. The sticky, transparent film is meant to be worn for several days, absorbing sunlight whenever the wearer goes outside. The adhesive is loaded with light-sensitive dyes that change color when exposed to UV light, so it allows the wearer to see if they’re being exposed to too many damaging UV rays over time. Related: L’Oreal to begin 3D-printing human skin The color changes can be hard to decode, which is why the patch also comes with an Android or iOS app , which uses a mobile device’s camera to scan the patch, compare it to the user’s baseline skin tone, and then tracks how much sun the users have been exposed to over time. Since the patch is looking at long-term exposure to the sun, it isn’t intended to serve as a warning when the time comes to reapply sunscreen . The patch will be completely free and is set to launch in 16 different countries worldwide sometime this summer. Via IFLScience Photos via L’Oreal and Shutterstock   Save

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L’Oral’s wearable patch changes color to warn against skin cancer

The x2 jet pack lets you effortlessly soar underwater like a dolphin

October 15, 2015 by  
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If you’ve ever wanted to play the part of an underwater superhero, now may be your chance with the new x2 Sport Underwater Jet Pack . Resembling the pack from Disney’s The Rocketeer , the x2 straps onto your back and can propel the user forward with high-power hydra thrusters attached to each arm. The x2 isn’t going to scoot you past a speed boat anytime soon, but the jet pack can get you moving to 6 miles per hour, which is way faster than any human can swim. Read the rest of The x2 jet pack lets you effortlessly soar underwater like a dolphin

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Adidas unveils futuristic shoe that’s 3D printed for a custom fit

October 11, 2015 by  
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Your dream pair of custom-fit running shoes may finally become an affordable reality. Adidas recently unveiled the “Futurecraft 3D,” a revolutionary running shoe with a midsole 3D-printed to fit the exact contours of the user’s foot. The shape of the shoe will also be informed by the individual’s running style in order to help boost running performance. READ MORE>

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Adidas unveils futuristic shoe that’s 3D printed for a custom fit

Tristan Roland Design transforms salvaged materials into elegant furniture

June 26, 2015 by  
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Salvaged and reappropriated, Tristan Roland Design turns throw-away-furniture into reusable objects for the interior. Everyday objects intrigue Roland, helping him to envision a new life as a means of recycling our household items. Character quality is important to Roland’s designs not only for their aesthetics, but also as a reminder of the user(s) before their transformation. The object’s prior function becomes completely altered and recreated to be designed as an object to be interacted with keeping comfort, elegance and functionality at the forefront. The designer is constantly looking for discarded objects with the intent to give it new meaning, a purpose other than waste. Roland remarks, “I’m constantly on the lookout for big objects on the sides of streets, it’s partly about the hunt and the reward from finding something so unwanted and turning it into a unique expressive work.” + Tristan Roland Design The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: furniture made from recycled materials , reader submitted content , Recycled Materials , salvaged materials , Tristan Roland , Tristan Roland Design

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Tristan Roland Design transforms salvaged materials into elegant furniture

Acer U.K. Presents Over-the-Top Tablet-Integrated Selfie Sombrero

September 21, 2014 by  
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We’ve recently featured many wearable tech products, but none are as ostentatious as this giant glittery, hot pink selfie-taking sombrero designed by Acer U.K. and Christian Cowan-Sanluis, a 20-year-old designer who’s previously worked with Lady Gaga . Equipped with an Iconia A1-840 tablet that spins 360 degrees, this high-tech hat appears to poke fun at the overblown selfie phenomenon while allowing the user to take better glamor shots. The limited edition hat is only viewable by appointment and retails at £599 ($980). READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Acer uk , Christian Cowan-Sanluis , Iconia A1-840 tablet , selfie hat , selfie sombrero , selfies , tablet integrated hat

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Acer U.K. Presents Over-the-Top Tablet-Integrated Selfie Sombrero

Be One With The Machine, Motorola’s New Digital Tattoos Can Unlock Your Phone

August 3, 2014 by  
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Are you a multitasking professional taking too much time to unlock your phone? Moto X owners don’t need to fumble around now with the new digital tattoos by Motorola. It sounds like science fiction but these innovative tattoos allow the user to effortlessly unlock their phone with one easy swipe. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cell phone , Communication , eco-fashion , Fashion , motorola , privacy , tattoos , upcycled clothing , wearable technology

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Be One With The Machine, Motorola’s New Digital Tattoos Can Unlock Your Phone

Gorgeous Folded Nomad Portable Herb Planters Made from Scrap Boat Sails and Covers

July 29, 2014 by  
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Nomad is a portable herb planter in the form of folded fabric. The design is adaptable to a variety of environments with limited space for plants. It can hang from a rope, sit on the coffee table, be transported to the window for more sunlight or the user may choose to only plant one side and hang it on the wall to create a vertical garden . The open ended design leaves the placement up to the user. The form is made out of a fabric rectangle, folded into a double sided pot and stamped with an eyelet. There is a gap between the two layers allowing the soil to breathe and drain. Nomad is made from scrap boat sails and boat covers. The materials are locally-sourced from the post production waste of sailmakers in the Bronx, New York. Some of the materials are sailcloth from the 80’s that isn’t up to par with the sail industry today. A joint senior thesis project at Parsons The New School For Design with Miriam Josi this past Spring, Nomad was developed through a common passion for food, design and sustainable living. + The Garden Department The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: city gardening , green design , nomad , portable herb planters , portable planters , reader submitted content , Recycled Materials , recycled sails , sail cloth , sustainable design , the garden department , Urban design , urban gardening

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