Uranium extracted from the oceans could power cities for thousands of years

July 5, 2016 by  
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Over four billion tons of uranium present in the ocean could help provide energy for ” the next 10,000 years ,” according to the U.S. Department of Energy. The element could be used to fuel nuclear power plants , except extraction poses significant challenges. The DoE funded a project involving scientists from laboratories and universities across the United States, and over the last five years they have made strides towards successfully extracting ocean uranium using special adsorbent fibers. People have attempted to mine ocean uranium for around 50 years. Japanese scientists in the 1990s came close with the development of adsorbent materials, or materials that can hold molecules on their surface. Building on their ideas, U.S. scientists worked on an adsorbent material that reduces uranium extraction costs ” by three to four times .” Related: Scientists develop new way to generate electricity via seawater The adsorbent material is made of ” braided polyethylene fibers ” that have a coating of the chemical amidoxime. The amidoxime attracts uranium dioxide, which sticks to the fibers. Scientists then use an acidic treatment to obtain the uranium, which is collected as uranyl ions. The uranyl ions must then be processed before they can be turned into fuel for nuclear power plants. Chemists, marine scientists, chemical engineers, computation scientists, and economists all worked on the project, and the journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research published several studies in an April special issue . The journal also presented research from Chinese and Japanese scientists. Phillip Britt, Division Director of Chemical Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, said, “For nuclear power to remain a sustainable energy source, an economically viable and secure source of nuclear fuel must be available. This special journal issue captures the dramatic successes that have been made by researchers across the world to make the oceans live up to their vast promise for a secure energy future.” What’s next? While the new adsorbent material does reduce costs, the process to gather ocean uranium is still costly. Nor is it efficient yet, but if perfected it could offer an important alternative fuel source. Via Scientific American Images via Krisztina Konczos on Flickr and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy

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Uranium extracted from the oceans could power cities for thousands of years

Green-Roofed Ecohabit Residence Learns About its Residents to Boost Efficiency

July 17, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Green-Roofed Ecohabit Residence Learns About its Residents to Boost Efficiency Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Ecohabit , EcoHabit Solar House , solar architecture , Solar Decathlon , solar decathlon 2013 , Solar Decathlon Team Stevens Institute of Technology , solar home competition , solar home design , SOLAR HOMES , Solar Living , Stevens Insitute of Technology Solar Decathlon , Stevens Institute of Technology Ecohabit , Stevens Institute of Technology solar home , us department of energy , US Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 , USDE Solar Decathlon        

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Green-Roofed Ecohabit Residence Learns About its Residents to Boost Efficiency

Crowdfunded 3D Ocean Farms Could Help Restore the Health of the Seas

July 10, 2013 by  
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The world’s oceans are experiencing a tough time. Overfishing , acidification from climate change, pollution , and dead zones have all become major challenges facing the health of aquatic ecosystems around the globe. While the problems may seem as massive, ocean farmer Brendan Smith has an innovative solution that takes advantage of nature’s proclivity to heal itself. Through a Kickstarter campaign , he is proposing using blue-green algae and shellfish to help restore marine habitats. Taking advantage of the entire water column, these 3D farms could assist in capturing carbon, produce healthy and local foods, create biodiversity, and provide a source for biofuel. Read the rest of Crowdfunded 3D Ocean Farms Could Help Restore the Health of the Seas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d farm , algae , biofuel , blue-green economy , brendan smith , carbon , Kelp , kickstarter , long island sound , Maine , New York. , nitrogen , ocean , Pollution , shellfish , thimble island oyster company , us department of energy , washington        

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Crowdfunded 3D Ocean Farms Could Help Restore the Health of the Seas

ASU’s SHADE House is an Affordable Eco Home for Suburban Living in the Southwest

July 5, 2013 by  
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SHADE isn’t just shelter from the sun – it stands for Solar Homes Adapting of Desert Equilibrium, which is the name of an eco house designed in collaboration between Arizona State University and the University of New Mexico . The stand-alone energy and water efficient house addresses the unique challenges presented by the suburban sprawl of southwestern cities like Phoenix and Albuquerque. The project is designed to work in harmony with the desert while providing an affordable housing option for the growing population in the Southwest. Read the rest of ASU’s SHADE House is an Affordable Eco Home for Suburban Living in the Southwest Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adaptability in architecture , Arizona State University , desert appropriate design , flex space , flexible floor plan , indoor outdoor spaces , irvine , modularity in architecture , movable walls , passive heating and cooling , radiant cooling , shade , solar decathalon 2013 , solar homes adapting of desert equilibrium , solar photovoltaic panels , southwest suburban sprawl , sustainable house , Thermal storage , university of new mexico , us department of energy        

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ASU’s SHADE House is an Affordable Eco Home for Suburban Living in the Southwest

Students in Alberta Create a Sustainable Modular Home for Families in Remote Areas

July 3, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Students in Alberta Create a Sustainable Modular Home for Families in Remote Areas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alberta Calgary Team Solar Decathlon , Borealis Modular Solar Home , Canada Team Solar Decathlon , Mount Royal University , Solar Decathlon , solar decathlon 2013 , solar home , Solar Modular Home Canada , Sustainable Building , sustainable living , sustainable modular homes , University of Calgary , us department of energy , USDE Solar Decathlon        

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Architects plan shipping container infrastructure for California

August 10, 2011 by  
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Ritu Mathur: (RE)configured Assemblage Designed by We-Designs.org Shipping containers are generally used in shipments or at best the old shipping container are used for storage in huge godowns but now a New York based practice We-Designs.org , along with XP& Architecture , is planning a huge building parallel with the long beach of California which will link the City of Long Beach, Long Beach Blvd and Broadway Area. The project is named as ‘(RE)configured-Assemblage’. Picture Gallery (RE)configured Assemblage (RE)Configured-Assemblag Designed by We-Designs.Org The idea is to create a huge space for people to nurture communal relationships and interaction at a big scale in the boulevard. The shipping containers will be interlocked in such a way that this pattern will generate open courtyards to enjoy sunny days and soft breezes coming from the beach. The four stories of the urban landscape will have provisions of art galleries, shops, cafes and even an educational center to create a compact place for visitors to enjoy their leisure in a holistic manner. While the building has been designed to be solely made for the purpose of entertainment and fun, the developers have not forgotten to create this entertaining space in a responsible way. Various eco friendly systems have been integrated in the design of the building. The outer skin of the structure is made entirely from unfolded containers which are suitable for South California climate as this layer helps in protecting the interior container from excessive sunlight. The inner skin of the containers help in saving on HVAC consumption and helps in natural ventilation through out the building. Besides, the green roof of the containers and the recycled gray water help in nurturing and watering plants. Moreover, re-adapted containers have also been used as furniture/planters, which will be installed at the edges of the building on the ground floor. Via: Designboom

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Architects plan shipping container infrastructure for California

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