Ski atop the worlds cleanest waste-to-energy plant in Copenhagen

October 9, 2019 by  
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Six years after breaking ground, CopenHill — a waste-to-energy plant topped with a year-round ski slope — is officially open, marking a major milestone in Copenhagen’s journey to becoming the world’s first carbon-neutral city by 2025. Bjarke Ingels Group , SLA, AKT, Lüchinger+Meyer, MOE and Rambøll designed the new architectural landmark that they describe as the cleanest waste-to-energy plant in the world. The building includes an environmental education hub as well as a landscaped roof for urban recreation including skiing, hiking and climbing. Designed to replace the neighboring 50-year-old waste-to-energy plant, the 41,000-square-meter CopenHill — also known as Amager Bakke — boasts state-of-the-art technologies in waste treatment and energy production. BIG, which won the 2011 international competition for the power plant, drew inspiration from the industrial waterfront of Amager that is now a hub for extreme sports. “CopenHill is a blatant architectural expression of something that would otherwise have remained invisible: that it is the cleanest waste-to-energy power plant in the world,” says Bjarke Ingels in a press release. “As a power plant, CopenHill is so clean that we have been able to turn its building mass into the bedrock of the social life of the city — its façade is climbable, its roof is hikeable and its slopes are skiable. A crystal clear example of Hedonistic Sustainability — that a sustainable city is not only better for the environment — it is also more enjoyable for the lives of its citizens.” Related: Are bioenergy facilities the solution to the growing garbage problem? In addition to the 9,000-square-meter ski terrain, visitors can enjoy hiking the building’s summit with the 490-meter-long hiking and running pathway landscaped with 7,000 bushes and 300 trees to mimic the look of a lush mountain trail. Soaring to a height of 85 meters, the 10,000-square-meter green roof also includes a rooftop bar, cross-fit area, climbing wall and observation area that can be reached via lift or glass elevator that provides views inside the 24-hour operations of the waste-to-energy plant that converts 440,000 tons of waste annually into enough clean energy to power 150,000 homes. The building also houses ten floors of administrative space for the ARC team and a 600-square-meter education center for academic tours, workshops and sustainability conferences. + BIG Images by Laurian Ghinitoiu, Aldo Amoretti, Dragoer Luftfoto, Rasmus Hjortshoj. and Soren Aagaard

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Ski atop the worlds cleanest waste-to-energy plant in Copenhagen

30 of world’s largest cities have hit peak greenhouse gas emissions milestone, C40 analysis shows

October 9, 2019 by  
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The international community has collaboratively crusaded to quickly reach peak global greenhouse gas emissions . By doing so, they hope to alleviate worldwide temperature rise and related climate disasters. A recent report confirms that 30 of the world’s largest cities — all members of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group — have completed their peak greenhouse gas emission milestones. What does it mean when a country or city “peaks” its greenhouse gas emissions? As part of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Paris Agreement , first enacted in 2016, countries across the globe — and their respective cities, some of which are members of the C40 — have agreed to decrease global warming by keeping the collective planet-wide temperature rise to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. To ensure this, the countries that have signed the Paris Agreement have set goals to drastically reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. When a country’s emissions levels have reversed substantially, they are described as having “peaked” at last, so they are now capable of industrially operating at emissions levels far below their “peak” point. Related: Cities around the world lay the groundwork for a zero-waste future According to the World Resources Institute (WRI) , “peaking” really began even before the Paris Agreement was established. For instance, by 1990, 19 countries were documented to have peaked their greenhouse gas emission levels . By 2000, an additional 14 countries reached their critical milestones. A decade later, in 2010, 16 more countries joined the list of countries that have peaked, including the United States and Canada, which both peaked in 2007. Meanwhile, in 2005, the multinational organization now known as C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, or C40 for short, was founded when representatives from 18 mega-cities cooperatively forged an agreement to address widespread pollution and climate change. The group began with 18 cities and has grown significantly since then. Interestingly, the C40, on its 10th anniversary back in 2015, was instrumental in shaping the Paris Agreement prior to its 2016 ratification. Now, ahead of the C40 World Mayors Summit, a new analysis just revealed that 30 of the world’s largest and most influential cities — all members of C40 — have each achieved their respective peak greenhouse gas emissions goals. The 30 cities include Athens, Austin, Barcelona, Berlin, Boston, Chicago, Copenhagen, Heidelberg, Lisbon, London, Los Angeles, Madrid, Melbourne, Milan, Montreal, New Orleans, New York City, Oslo, Paris, Philadelphia, Portland, Rome, San Francisco, Stockholm, Sydney, Toronto, Vancouver, Venice, Warsaw and Washington, D.C. The C40 analysis further disclosed that these 30 influential cities have helped to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 22 percent, which is encouraging. “The C40 cities that have reached peak emissions are raising the bar for climate ambition, and, at the same time, exemplifying how climate action creates healthier, more equitable and resilient communities,” said Mark Watts, executive director of C40 Cities.  To further its endeavors, C40 has launched the C40 Knowledge Hub . It is an online platform dedicated to informing and inspiring policies to ramp up global climate initiatives that can encourage even more sustainable changes to protect the planet. + C40 Image via Anne Hogdal

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30 of world’s largest cities have hit peak greenhouse gas emissions milestone, C40 analysis shows

Which cities are the most sustainable? WalletHub releases Top 100 Greenest US Cities 2019

October 9, 2019 by  
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Ever wonder which American cities are the most eco-friendly? WalletHub recently unveiled its list of 2019’s Greenest Cities in the U.S., after comparing 100 of the country’s most populated cities across 28 underlying indicators of environmental-friendliness and sustainability. Some of the key factors surveyed were greenhouse gas emissions per capita, green job opportunities per capita, smart energy policies and clean initiatives. Interestingly, nine of the top 10 greenest U.S. cities are on the West Coast. WalletHub, renowned as a personal finance website, has long advocated for consumer interests. Green living is a growing public concern, perhaps because sustainability and financial needs are closely intertwined. To find the American cities with the best green programs and eco-conscious consumer habits, WalletHub conducted this study. Related: 2019 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard reveals leading states in clean energy adoption What is green living, though? Green living is a lifestyle that embraces environmental preservation by reducing, reusing and recycling . It contributes to ecological protection and habitat biodiversity while simultaneously conserving natural resources. There is, after all, increasing demand for coordination around land conservation, local agriculture, renewable energy and waste reduction. According to WalletHub, green living boils down to a choice of preserving the planet. This can be achieved via cleaner, more sustainable practices and habits. Green living benefits both the environment and public health , which places greener cities at an advantage. By assessing 28 metrics, including a city’s environmental quality and climate change contributions, transportation and energy sources, lifestyle and eco-friendly behaviors and policies, WalletHub determined the following to be the top 10 greenest cities in the country. 1. San Francisco, California 2. San Diego, California 3. Irvine, California 4. Washington, D.C. 5. San Jose, California 6. Seattle, Washington 7. Fremont, California 8. Sacramento, California 9. Portland, Oregon 10. Oakland, California While WalletHub’s study did not assess all cities in the U.S., it did examine the top 100 largest cities by population. After highlighting the greenest states in the group, WalletHub also called out those at the bottom of the list, citing them as needing improvement. Those that ranked in the bottom as the least green of the most populous American cities are: 91. Virginia Beach, Virginia 92. Jacksonville, Florida 93. Detroit, Michigan 94. Cleveland, Ohio 95. Gilbert, Arizona 96. Mesa, Arizona 97. Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 98. Toledo, Ohio 99. Corpus Christi, Texas 100. Baton Rouge, Lousiana Green living continues to gain momentum. It is hoped that by more people consistently choosing to go green, incessant waste and its associated long-term costs can be reduced, thereby saving money at the household, local, state, national and even international levels. More importantly, it can preserve our planet for years to come. + WalletHub Image via Pexels

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Which cities are the most sustainable? WalletHub releases Top 100 Greenest US Cities 2019

BIG’s Quirky Kilometer Long Superkilen Park Celebrates Diversity in Copenhagen

October 23, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of BIG’s Quirky Kilometer Long Superkilen Park Celebrates Diversity in Copenhagen Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , big , copenhagen , diversity , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , kopenhagen , nationality , superflex , superkilen , superkilen park , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , Topotek1 , Urban design , urban park

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BIG’s Quirky Kilometer Long Superkilen Park Celebrates Diversity in Copenhagen

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