Vacant lots are being transformed into urban bee farms in Detroit

February 9, 2018 by  
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“Work hard, stay bumble,” is the motto of Detroit nonprofit Detroit Hives . The organization aims to conserve honeybees by turning abandoned urban lots into community bee farms. Timothy Paule and Nicole Lindsey started the nonprofit last year, and so far they’ve transformed one lot into a space with vegetable garden plots and three hives – and they’re just getting started. Something’s buzzing in Detroit. Detroit Hives is tackling a few issues, namely honeybee conservation , blight in the city created by vacant lots , and educating the community on bees . Paule told HuffPost the inspiration came from a cold that just wouldn’t go away. A local market worker told him to try local honey for its medicinal properties. He and Lindsey also began to realize how urban blight might play a part in allergies, as overgrown ragweeds took over. They could tackle that issue by producing local honey on vacant sites. Related: America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 households for free Lindsey and Paule took beekeeping courses and purchased their first vacant lot for $340 on Detroit’s East Side. Thousands of bees now buzz on the lot, and the neighbors love the farm, according to Lindsey. We transform Detroit Vacant lots into urban bee farms. We are responsible for a quarter of a million honey bees in the East Warren community and we offer tours and bee education for the community. Work Hard, Stay Bumble. #DetroitHives #Savethebees #UrbanBeekeeper #UrbanBeeFarm #Detroit #Michigan #PureMichigan #Nonprofit #VizzeeInc #Honey #Support #Donate #Canon #Beekeeper A post shared by Detroit Hives (@detroithives) on Aug 25, 2017 at 2:47pm PDT She told HuffPost, “They say they wish we were there 10, 20 years ago. That area has always been a place where people dump trash, so when we came there, we gave that area a sense of purpose. The neighbors keep an eye on the area to make sure that people aren’t dumping anymore.” We bring bee consciousness to your community by transforming blighted land into honey bee conservations. #beekeeping #DetroitHives #Michigan #PureMichigan #DNR #MDNR #urbanbeekeeper #blackgirlmagic #beeeducation #rawhoney #adidasoriginals #blackbeekeepers #blackbeekeeper A post shared by Detroit Hives (@detroithives) on Aug 4, 2017 at 10:58am PDT Per Black Enterprise, Detroit Hives has partnered with local vendors like The Black Bottom Brewery, Detroit Soup, and a homeless shelter to provide local, raw honey, and they also sell their sweet product. They offer public tours and speak at schools in the area to help the community learn more about bees. They aim to expand beyond their first farm this year. + Detroit Hives Via Black Enterprise and HuffPost Images via Eric Ward on Unsplash and Massimiliano Latella on Unsplash

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Vacant lots are being transformed into urban bee farms in Detroit

The sun is getting dimmer – but it won’t let us off the hook for global warming

February 9, 2018 by  
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Sun worshippers, take note – scientists say that Earth’s life-giving orb of light is dimming, and by 2050 we’ll be living in a colder, darker world than the one we know today. If you think that’s positive news for global warming, brace yourself: while we might get a short reprieve, in the long run, we are still as screwed as ever. The sun has a regular 11-year cycle in which solar radiation rises and falls. But according to a recent study in The Astrophysical journal Letters , for the past few cycles the high has been lower than normal. Consequently, the amount of heat and light we get from the sun has been dropping. In the next few decades, that effect is likely to continue, leaving us with 5 to 8% less radiation. The last time this happened was when the Earth went through what is known as a mini-Ice Age (aka The Grand Minimum to scientists), which happened during the mid-1600s. There’s some debate that this mini-Ice Age was actually due to volcanic activity, but the point is this: even though we may experience some reduction in the heat and light reaching the Earth, the rapidly warming planet is heating up faster than the sun is dimming. Which means that, in all likelihood, we may experience a few years that aren’t as hot as they could be, but they will still be hotter than normal. Related: Scientists Consider Blocking Out the Sun to Stop Climate Change Short term, this means that we might get a bit of a break from the effects of climate change. But the problem is that we humans have a hard time making difficult changes based on future consequences. If we start to see a lessening of global warming’s impact, many may conclude that the threat is over and continue business as usual. But eventually, the sun is going to heat back up, and when it does, we will be in really bad shape. + The Astrophysical journal Letters Via Outer Places Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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The sun is getting dimmer – but it won’t let us off the hook for global warming

Flow Hive: New crowdsourced project lets beekeepers harvest honey on demand

February 23, 2015 by  
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We know that honeybees are having a rough time , so we’re very excited to hear about Flow Hive —a new honey collection and extraction system that allows beekeepers to easily harvest honey from their hives by quite literally having it on tap. The result of 10 years of careful research and design from Australian father and son duo Stuart and Cedar Anderson, the Flow system replaces regular frames in standard beehives and means beekeepers can ‘rob’ their hives without having to open them, disturb the bees or risk being stung. The Flow Hive blew its Indiegogo campaign out of the water on its first day, receiving more than $1 million in pledges. Click through to read more about the design that could revolutionize beekeeping and that makes it so much easier for backyard beekeepers to do their bit to help honeybees and their vital pollination work . Read the rest of Flow Hive: New crowdsourced project lets beekeepers harvest honey on demand Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Animals , apiculture , beehive , beekeeping , bees , colony collapse disorder , Flow Frames , Flow Hive , Gardening , honey , honey extraction , honey extraction without disturbing bees , Honey Flow , honey on tap , insects , pollinators , urban beekeeping

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Flow Hive: New crowdsourced project lets beekeepers harvest honey on demand

Snøhetta’s Vulkan Hives Bring Urban Beekeeping to a Rooftop in Oslo

August 22, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Snøhetta’s Vulkan Hives Bring Urban Beekeeping to a Rooftop in Oslo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bee hives , beekeeping , city bee hive , colony collapse disorder , eco design , green design , norway , oslo , snohetta , sustainable design , The Vulkan Project Oslo , Urban bee hives , urban beekeeping , Vulkan Beehives

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Snøhetta’s Vulkan Hives Bring Urban Beekeeping to a Rooftop in Oslo

Open Source Beehives let Citizens Save Bees from their own Backyards

March 11, 2014 by  
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A new crowdfunding project aims to put the power to fight colony collapse disorder in the hands of everyday people. Now, anyone can log on and download a simple design for their own internet-connected beehive . These hives do more than provide a home for local bee populations — they also give scientists new tools to monitor global bee health using specialized sensors which track geolocation, humidity, temperature, bee numbers, and even the mood of the colony. The hope is that being able to crowdsource this data will help scientists better understand why bees are declining and how to protect them. Read the rest of Open Source Beehives let Citizens Save Bees from their own Backyards Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bee colonies , bee decline , beehives , beekeeping , colony collapse disorder , Crowdfunding , crowdsourcing , honey bees , open source , urban beekeeping        

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Open Source Beehives let Citizens Save Bees from their own Backyards

FARMM’s b-Shack is an Urban Hive and Bee Study Center for McGill Students

February 7, 2014 by  
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The brilliant b-Shack developed by McGill School of Architecture students is an urban beehive that doubles as an educational facility. The project will bring urban beekeepers and volunteers together to help foster Montreal’s bee population by creating a pavilion that is surrounded by working hives. The educational structure is designed to mimic a hive, and it provides a forum for locals to learn about the effects of colony collapse disorder . Read the rest of FARMM’s b-Shack is an Urban Hive and Bee Study Center for McGill Students Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: b-Shack , colony collapse disorder , eco design , FARMM , green design , McGill Facility for Architectural Research in Media and Mediation , McGill University , Santropol , Senneville Farm , sustainable design , urban beekeeping        

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FARMM’s b-Shack is an Urban Hive and Bee Study Center for McGill Students

Cattle are the World’s Top Greenhouse Gas Emitters Among Livestock, Study Finds

February 7, 2014 by  
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If you want to dramatically reduce your carbon footprint, you might want to start with your dinner plate. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that cattle are the top emitters of greenhouse gasses among livestock. The research, backed by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) found that among small ruminants, poultry, pigs, and cattle were responsible for more than three-quarters of livestock emissions. Read the rest of Cattle are the World’s Top Greenhouse Gas Emitters Among Livestock, Study Finds Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bbc news , cattle , china , Climate Change , commonwealth scientific and industrial research organization , diet , global warming , greenhouse gas emissions , international livestock research institute , Latin America , livestock , north america , poultry , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , ruminants , south asia , sub-saharan africa , un world health organization        

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Cattle are the World’s Top Greenhouse Gas Emitters Among Livestock, Study Finds

NEXT Architects’ Elastic Perspective is an Impossible Mobius Strip Staircase Near Rotterdam

February 7, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of NEXT Architects’ Elastic Perspective is an Impossible Mobius Strip Staircase Near Rotterdam Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , art installation , carnisselande , elastic perspective , hilltop staircase , mobius strip , next architects , rotterdam , staircase , the netherlands        

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NEXT Architects’ Elastic Perspective is an Impossible Mobius Strip Staircase Near Rotterdam

Beehaus Provides Urban Rooftop Housing for Two Bee Colonies

August 29, 2013 by  
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Urban beekeeping has never been easier than with the sporty Beehaus . Resembling a picnic cooler, the easily maintainable hive is actually two hives in one, with two entrances that accommodate 22 separate frames. Made for city roof tops or gardens , the Beehaus is designed to not only protect beekeepers, but also to protect bees from the elements, as well as from wasps and other pests that threaten the health of the hive. Read the rest of Beehaus Provides Urban Rooftop Housing for Two Bee Colonies Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Beehaus , eco design , green design , rooftop beehive , sustainable design , urban beekeeping        

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Japanese Engineers Create Ultralight, 3D-Printed Ornithopter Based on a Prehistoric Dragonfly!

August 29, 2013 by  
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Since the early days of our existence, humans have always been jealous of flying animals. From bugs to birds, we’ve spent a lot of time trying to copy organisms who have the ability to defy gravity. Our modern planes, helicopters , and yes, even drones  are our best attempts to recreate nature’s engineering, but none have come close to the beauty of a real bird in flight – until now. Osaka-based  Flapping Wing Production Studio  recently released a video of their latest invention: an ultralight orinthopter (a craft that flies by flapping its wings.) Built using simple materials and mechanical parts made with a 3D printer, “Meganeuropsis” is one of the largest orinthopters to complete a successful flight. Read the rest of Japanese Engineers Create Ultralight, 3D-Printed Ornithopter Based on a Prehistoric Dragonfly! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printing , dragonfly , drone , Flapping Wing Production Studio , helicopter , Japan , Makerbot Replicator , Meganeuropsis , Orinthopter        

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Japanese Engineers Create Ultralight, 3D-Printed Ornithopter Based on a Prehistoric Dragonfly!

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