This incredible floating hotel can take you on the voyage of a lifetime in Japan

February 2, 2018 by  
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Guntû is a gorgeous floating hotel that takes passengers on a whirlwind tour of Japan ‘s Seto inland sea. The vessel was designed by Japanese architect Yasushi Horibe , and it includes all the amenities of a luxury cruise ship while upping the ante with a distinctly Japanese experience. Guntû has a total of 19 two-person guest rooms, each outfitted with private terraces that offer unobstructed views of the surrounding sea and shores. You can kick back and relax on the rooftop deck , while common areas like the Grand Suite create a vibrant environment for socialization. Wood dominates the design of the hotel –from the interior of the common areas and private rooms, to the cocktail bars and balcony tubs. Related: This floating hotel and spa in Sweden will fill you with wanderlust Guests can book stays up to three nights, but it isn’t cheap – rates start at 400,000 yen ($3,668 US) per night for two guests. This arrangement includes all meals and on-board services. The floating hotel starts its journey in Onomichi City and allows guests to explore coastal Japan while selecting from a variety of on-shore activities. + Guntû + Yasushi Horibe Architect & Associates Via Apartment Therapy

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This incredible floating hotel can take you on the voyage of a lifetime in Japan

Trump administration wants to revive long-stalled nuclear waste storage project

November 17, 2016 by  
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As news of President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team appointments come to light, environmental activists and energy experts across the nation, if not the world, are cringing with concern. Now, his advisers reportedly want to revive a plan to stow radioactive waste at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain , a project stalled since the mid-1980s due to environmental concerns. The project has already been deemed too expensive and difficult to continue, and has not received federal funding for years. Trump’s aim to bring it back to life demonstrates what kind of president he will be. The Yucca Mountain nuclear waste project has been held at bay primarily due to the efforts of one man: Nevada Senator Harry Reid. Reid is now on the cusp of retirement and, in his absence, Trump’s advisers are looking for ways to steamroll the Senate into greenlighting the project. Yucca Mountain was initially selected as a nuclear waste storage site in 1987, but one administration after the next was unable to push it through to operation, in part due to the enormous environmental risk involved. President Barack Obama’s administration cut off funding to the project in 2010, finally declaring it an unworkable solution to the nation’s nuclear waste storage needs. Related: Keystone XL pipeline could be resurrected under Trump administration With an unapologetic anti-environmentalist primed to enter the White House, two people from Trump’s campaign say the Yucca Mountain project is again on the table. After tapping top climate denier Myron Ebell to lead his EPA transition team, Trump is upping the ante in his war on the environment by looking for ways to skirt the nation’s commitment to the Paris climate agreement as well as actively supporting projects that cause massive destruction, such as the Keystone XL pipeline (which could be resurrected under Trump’s watch). With each new development in the constructing of Trump’s administration, it becomes more clear that America’s next leader is intent on exploiting the environment for capital gain, no matter what Al Gore says to him . Via Bloomberg Images via Wikipedia

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Trump administration wants to revive long-stalled nuclear waste storage project

US city votes to end fossil fuel extraction ahead of Trump inauguration

November 17, 2016 by  
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The city of San Francisco voted to approve a measure on Monday that prohibits city-owned lands from being used for fossil fuel extraction . The move is an early step to protect the immediate area from the damaging effects of oil industry activity, and to pave the way for more profitable, and more sustainable, renewable energy projects. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved the legislation swiftly, setting a solid example for other municipalities to take steps to create protections that the next presidential administration will not be so keen on enacting. The proposed legislation prohibits San Francisco “from entering into or extending leases for the extraction of fossil fuel from city-owned land.” While this news may concern some who believe fossil fuels offer a necessary source of income for city revenue, the legislation’s backers have a different picture to illustrate. The bill was initially proposed after it came to light that Chevron was lasing an 800-acre property from the city and that such a plot of land could net the city an additional $320,000 a year if it were developed into a solar array , over the existing revenue from current oil operations. Related: California officially becomes first state to ban plastic bags “We’re headed for catastrophic changes to our climate if we don’t reduce our use of fossil fuels now. With the pending Trump presidency, local leadership on climate change is more urgent and important than ever,” said City Supervisor John Avalos. “San Francisco and other cities can help lead this country into the clean energy future we need and resist the catastrophic policies our president-elect has proposed. The fact that we can make as much revenue from solar as we do from oil just reinforces that it’s time to keep dirty fossil fuels in ground and transition to a renewable-powered economy.” The city’s proposed legislation received unanimous support from the board’s Budget and Finance Committee on October 26 and its Land Use Committee on November 14, in part due to an active public community. Now, the Board of Supervisors will follow with a second vote on November 29, where the bill is also expected to advance. If it does, the proposal will land on Mayor Ed Lee’s desk. He is expected to approve it quickly, given the precedent of unanimous support from the city’s leadership. Via Ecowatch Images via Wikipedia and Shutterstock

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US city votes to end fossil fuel extraction ahead of Trump inauguration

Namibia Designates Its Entire 976-Mile Coastline a National Park

February 11, 2011 by  
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Namibia has long embraced the idea that tourism can fund conservation. It’s had some notable success with the strategy; the nation succeeded in stabilizing a once-endangered population of lions. Now, Namibia is upping the ante — it just designated its entire coastline a national park.

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Namibia Designates Its Entire 976-Mile Coastline a National Park

Climate Change to Worsen Severe Water Shortages in US Southwest

February 11, 2011 by  
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Photo: Heat USA We’re already well aware that the American Southwest, which is naturally hot and dry, is seriously strapped for water. And the situation is getting worse every day, with populations in California, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico continuing an unimpeded growth trend that began decades ago. The fact there are too many people vying for limited resources in the region have lead experts to predict a major water shortfall that will cost billions to ameliorate

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Climate Change to Worsen Severe Water Shortages in US Southwest

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