How To Make Cloth Napkins From Upcycled Fabric

November 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How To Make Cloth Napkins From Upcycled Fabric

Cloth napkins have more wiping power than their paper counterparts, … The post How To Make Cloth Napkins From Upcycled Fabric appeared first on Earth 911.

Read more:
How To Make Cloth Napkins From Upcycled Fabric

How To Make an Upcycled Jar Terrarium

November 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How To Make an Upcycled Jar Terrarium

Terrariums add variety, depth, and beauty to your plant collection. … The post How To Make an Upcycled Jar Terrarium appeared first on Earth 911.

See the rest here:
How To Make an Upcycled Jar Terrarium

What Are Nurdles and Why Should You Care?

November 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on What Are Nurdles and Why Should You Care?

Nurdles, also known as “pre-production pellets,” are small pellets of … The post What Are Nurdles and Why Should You Care? appeared first on Earth 911.

Original post:
What Are Nurdles and Why Should You Care?

WOOMETRY upcycles salvaged wood into eco-friendly home goods

October 5, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on WOOMETRY upcycles salvaged wood into eco-friendly home goods

On the outskirts of Lisbon, Portugal in Santa Iria de Azoia, sustainable creative studio WOOMETRY is giving unwanted wood pieces a second life by transforming the salvaged materials into home goods and other 3D objects. Founded in March 2018 by architect Kate Bombony and woodworker Mike Beck, the design studio has recently grown to include a third team member and adopted partial automation of the production processes to allow more focus on the studio’s mission of sustainability. Open to visits from guests, the WOOMETRY creative studio operates out of the former MEC factory, an industrial appliance manufacturing plant. The main focus of the three-person creative design studio is the production of decorative panels and surfaces from recycled wood. The modular panels are based on an isometric grid; the modules can be put together in an infinite number of combinations to create three-dimensional designs on two-dimensional surfaces. The design team has also dabbled in creating other home products such as minimalist incense holders and Ondanova surfboards made of recycled wood and processed with laser-cutting machines and CNC milling. Related: Award-winning grass-covered pavilion in India constructed with over 1,000 recycled pallets “At WOOMETRY all objects are made of 100% recycled wood that is rescued from the street and given a second life,” the creative design studio explained. “As a result, WOOMETRY avoids using new materials and adding more waste, as well as saving a lot of water, reducing CO2 emissions and avoids contributing to the rise in tree cutting worldwide. It’s important to keep all the production locally so that we keep our carbon trace low. We also like to know everyone involved in the process and communicate with them directly in order to be sure that the working conditions are ethical and decent.” The team also collects and reuses discarded cardboard to package their goods for shipping rather than using new packages or plastic materials.  + WOOMETRY Images via WOOMETRY

See original here:
WOOMETRY upcycles salvaged wood into eco-friendly home goods

7 Ingenious Upcycling Ideas You’ll Fall in Love With!

August 31, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 7 Ingenious Upcycling Ideas You’ll Fall in Love With!

There are so many amazing people in this world who … The post 7 Ingenious Upcycling Ideas You’ll Fall in Love With! appeared first on Earth 911.

Read the original post:
7 Ingenious Upcycling Ideas You’ll Fall in Love With!

These funky sandals upcycle fabric from the cutting room floor

June 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on These funky sandals upcycle fabric from the cutting room floor

The fashion industry deserves a harsh slap on the wrist for how its manufacturing impacts the environment . From the overconsumption of resources to water pollution to material waste, it’s refreshing when companies take corporate responsibility and show concern for nature. Native Shoes is one such company, with a history of making a light footprint in the production of their footwear. The company’s newest release, Davis Repurposed, is a slight variation from their already popular Davis collection. Related: Native Shoes’ Bloom collection is made of repurposed algae The ‘repurposed’ portion reflects that these shoes use scraps of leftover material that would otherwise go to waste. By being repurposed for these bright, bold and fun sandals, the colorful fabric stays out of landfills. Featuring two-straps, adjustable buckles, an EVA midsole and a contoured footbed, Davis Repurposed serves as a versatile shoe option for day trips, hiking excursions, beach walks or backyard celebrations. The line carries adult, junior and child sizes for all genders, with the addition of a thoughtful stretchy heel strap for the toddler set. Each pair retails for $55 CAD (child), $61 CAD (junior) and $75 CAD (adult). Native is not new to the sustainable manufacturing effort, with a history of innovative research and design. For example, its Plant Shoe uses only natural glues and a  plant-based, biodegradable template . The company manufactures its Bloom collection with repurposed algae using Rise by Bloom technology. Each of these examples serves Native’s mission statement: “Our goal by 2023, is for each and every pair of Natives Shoes to be 100% life cycle managed.” Native’s Remix Project aims to provide a return method for all Native-produced shoes so consumers can easily send them back to the company, where they are then recycled into other products for the community. According to the initiative, “The unique composition of Native Shoes can be reground into versatile material that is useful in the creation of seating, playground flooring, insulation and more. Leveraging a proprietary regrind process, we are able to break down the materials found in every style of Native Shoes including sandals, slip-ons, knit sneakers and boots. From that point – there’s no telling where your soles could turn up!” + Native Shoes Images via Native Shoes

See the rest here: 
These funky sandals upcycle fabric from the cutting room floor

Grade II listed Victorian home undergoes a green renovation

April 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Grade II listed Victorian home undergoes a green renovation

London-based firm Will Gamble Architects has breathed new life into a dilapidated building in the small village of Gretton, U.K. The complex consisted of a Grade II listed Victorian house, a disused cattle shed and a set of ruins of a former parchment factory. Although the project presented several challenges, the architects managed to strategically incorporate the existing structures, as well as several reclaimed materials found onsite, into the new design in lieu of complete demolition. The Parchment Works House represents the best of green renovation that incorporates a deep respect for the past. Because the project involved restoring a Grade II listed Victorian home, the architects had to work within several building restrictions. Buildings listed as Grade II are legally protected from being demolished, so the designers were forced to get creative with a redesign. Related: A Victorian cottage gets a stylish and sustainable makeover The original plan called for renovating the home while incorporating the  disused cattle shed. The adjacent complex, which only had stone walls remaining and was in complete ruins, was initially going to be demolished. However, Will Gamble Architects saw the value in incorporating the ruins into the new design via a “sensitive but well-conceived intervention.” With a new green renovation plan underway, the project centered around using what was onsite for construction. Working within the focus of creating “a building within a building”, the process began by inserting two modern volumes within the complex’s existing structures. Using the old masonry walls as an envelope, the new house consists of a modern interior wrapped solidly in the site’s history and rural setting. The two volumes are clad in a blend of weathered steel, oak and reclaimed brick. Additional materials found onsite were also upcycled for use throughout the Victorian home, enabling the architects to save on costs and make the renovation more sustainable. The interior of the home is thoroughly minimalist and modern. Each room is filled with natural light. The kitchen is the heart of the home and doubles as a space for gathering. Despite the house’s modern design, the interior stone walls were repaired and washed in lime to create a mottled effect while the exposed ceiling beams were repurposed from the old cattle shed for a striking contrast between past and present. + Will Gamble Architects Via ArchDaily Photography by John Dehlin via Will Gamble Architects

Go here to read the rest:
Grade II listed Victorian home undergoes a green renovation

Dark Chalet in Utah will generate over 350% more energy than it needs

April 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Dark Chalet in Utah will generate over 350% more energy than it needs

Los Angeles-based Tom Wiscombe Architecture will be putting the final touches on its “Dark Chalet” by October 2020. Located about an hour north of Salt Lake City on the slopes of Summit’s Powder Mountain in Eden, Utah, the mysterious, net-positive energy building will generate 364% more power than it needs thanks to an integrated commercial-grade solar panel system. Net-positive energy in architecture refers to a building that generates more power than is needed for the structure to operate, going a step further than traditional net-zero energy systems. The extra energy can be utilized for features such as electric vehicle charging and hosting large events or even as a long-term plan to help offset the energy it took to construct the building in the first place. Excess energy can also be returned to the grid. Related: Kendeda, a net-positive Living Building, opens at Georgia Tech The 5,500-square-foot Dark Chalet is meant to act as both a single-family residence and a venue for the Summit Powder Mountain community events. The main structure, which looks like a massive black diamond against the snowy white backdrop, is fitted to follow the natural slope of the mountain with a lifted section contoured to allow skiers to pass through. The entire exterior is constructed with a woven patchwork of matte and glossy solar panels embedded into each other. This design fades the system into the background unlike traditional solar panels; the arrangement helps draw little attention to the fact that energy is being generated and instead presents a sleek exterior. At the forefront of the interior, a mega-scaled fireplace will connect all levels of the house through a network of strategically embedded staircases, a design meant to inspire images of grand ski chalets and castles. The 28-foot-wide fireplace is made of black steel. Both the staircases and the fireplace will have elements including bookshelves, walkways and storage spaces. The completion of the Dark Chalet in October will mark the first phase of a 10,000-acre Summit Powder Mountain ski resort . + Tom Wiscombe Architecture Via The Architect’s Newspaper Images via Tom Wiscombe Architecture

Read more: 
Dark Chalet in Utah will generate over 350% more energy than it needs

Archivist releases shirts made from recycled hotel sheets

April 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Archivist releases shirts made from recycled hotel sheets

Sometimes, being disruptive is fashionable. As for Archivist, a sustainable clothing company, its business plan counts on being disruptive in the name of fashion and corporate responsibility. With this mission, Archivist has found a unique yet luxurious inspiration for a new line of tailored shirts — hotel sheets. The story begins with a query on what happens to hotel sheets once they are discarded. The answer inspired a campaign to turn used bedding into sustainable fashion. As such, Archivist is the brainchild of partners Eugenie Haitsma and Johannes Offerhaus, Dutch designers who reached out to European hotels and quickly received 200 kilos of fine Egyptian cotton sheets. Although they were worn enough to be pulled from the hotels, these high-quality sheets still has plenty of performance life left. Archivist moved quickly to disrupt the flow of hotel sheets to landfills, instead creating a men’s leisure shirt and a women’s work shirt, two initial releases in what the company hopes to be a growing line of sustainable clothing options. Related: This biodegradable T-shirt is made from trees and algae The duo is busy reaching out to additional luxury hotels across Europe in a plan that helps them source materials while also extending an eco-friendly way for the hotels to get rid of old sheets. Transport distances are short because the hotels, located across Europe, send linens directly to a workshop near Bucharest. There, a family-run atelier thoroughly washes, cuts and manufactures the material into shirts. While there may be minor defects in the fabric, the team aims to minimize cut-off waste. Equally important, the shirt designs are timeless, offering a long lifespan instead of the disposable nature of trendy items. The men’s leisure shirt, made from 100% upcycled hotel linens, is offered in three sizes, which the company describes as flowy and oversized. The women’s work shirt is also created from sheets, but the design incorporates a subtle stripe woven into the fabric for a classic look that can be paired with a suit, slacks or jeans. It is also available in three sizes. Both shirts ship free within the EU and are priced at 150 euros (about $164). If you happen to get a shirt with a defect, Archivist will happily send you free patches. + Archivist Photography by Arturo Bamboo via Archivist

Read more from the original source:
Archivist releases shirts made from recycled hotel sheets

Archivist releases shirts made from recycled hotel sheets

April 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Archivist releases shirts made from recycled hotel sheets

Sometimes, being disruptive is fashionable. As for Archivist, a sustainable clothing company, its business plan counts on being disruptive in the name of fashion and corporate responsibility. With this mission, Archivist has found a unique yet luxurious inspiration for a new line of tailored shirts — hotel sheets. The story begins with a query on what happens to hotel sheets once they are discarded. The answer inspired a campaign to turn used bedding into sustainable fashion. As such, Archivist is the brainchild of partners Eugenie Haitsma and Johannes Offerhaus, Dutch designers who reached out to European hotels and quickly received 200 kilos of fine Egyptian cotton sheets. Although they were worn enough to be pulled from the hotels, these high-quality sheets still has plenty of performance life left. Archivist moved quickly to disrupt the flow of hotel sheets to landfills, instead creating a men’s leisure shirt and a women’s work shirt, two initial releases in what the company hopes to be a growing line of sustainable clothing options. Related: This biodegradable T-shirt is made from trees and algae The duo is busy reaching out to additional luxury hotels across Europe in a plan that helps them source materials while also extending an eco-friendly way for the hotels to get rid of old sheets. Transport distances are short because the hotels, located across Europe, send linens directly to a workshop near Bucharest. There, a family-run atelier thoroughly washes, cuts and manufactures the material into shirts. While there may be minor defects in the fabric, the team aims to minimize cut-off waste. Equally important, the shirt designs are timeless, offering a long lifespan instead of the disposable nature of trendy items. The men’s leisure shirt, made from 100% upcycled hotel linens, is offered in three sizes, which the company describes as flowy and oversized. The women’s work shirt is also created from sheets, but the design incorporates a subtle stripe woven into the fabric for a classic look that can be paired with a suit, slacks or jeans. It is also available in three sizes. Both shirts ship free within the EU and are priced at 150 euros (about $164). If you happen to get a shirt with a defect, Archivist will happily send you free patches. + Archivist Photography by Arturo Bamboo via Archivist

Read more from the original source: 
Archivist releases shirts made from recycled hotel sheets

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 5024 access attempts in the last 7 days.