Peek inside the zero-waste kitchen of the future

May 24, 2017 by  
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The kitchen of the future will be healthier for our planet and improve our family ties through food. That’s the vision behind The Future Kitchen, a proposal by New York-based architect Marc Thorpe and students of the industrial design department at Pratt Institute. Installed for WantedDesign Manhattan at the Caeserstone booth, the innovative kitchen prototype emphasizes sustainability with zero-waste systems and in-home gardening, while strengthening social ties with its community-oriented design. ? Environmentally friendly principles were at the heart of the kitchen design process. With Thorpe’s guidance, Pratt students researched sustainable strategies for water use, composting , farming, smart technology, and food storage. The Future Kitchen is self-sufficient, a feature Thorpe says will be a necessity in 2050 when 80 percent of the world’s population is estimated to reside in urban centers. ? Related: Friends give their kitchen a green makeover filled with fun upcycled touches The innovative design is centered on a circular hearth that reinforces the idea of the kitchen as a social meeting place. The circular hearth opening also doubles as a food waste disposal chute that feeds the biogas generator and 3D printer, repurposing waste as energy and material. The washing area uses stream automation to minimize water usage, and water drains into a filter system that repurposes wastewater into hydroponic and aquaponic systems. A food prep area with Caesarstone quartz, induction cooktop with smart technology, and separate dining area are also integrated into the compact Future Kitchen. + Marc Thorpe + Pratt Institute + Caesarstone

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Peek inside the zero-waste kitchen of the future

How to Remove Labels and Odors from Food Jars

March 27, 2017 by  
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In the realm of upcycling, empty food bottles are definitely rock stars. Use them to tote salads to work or as stylishly offbeat drinkware at a party. If your rolling pin is out of reach, pick up a bottle to flatten your dough. Even with no fuss,…

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How to Remove Labels and Odors from Food Jars

See how banana trees are recycled into vegan leather wallets in Micronesia

February 24, 2017 by  
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Forget plastic and leather, your next wallet could be made from a more ethical and eco-friendly alternative—banana fiber. Kosrae, Micronesia-based startup Green Banana Paper tapped into banana tree waste, upcycling the unlikely material into stylish and sturdy vegan leather wallets. Green Banana Paper launched a Kickstarter to bring these eco friendly wallets to the global market and help improve the lives of local farmers. Bananas may be easy to eat, but the trees they grow on need a surprising amount of work. There are approximately 200,000 banana trees spread across the island and after harvesting, local farmers must cut down the plant every year to promote fruit production. The mass amounts of banana fiber waste are typically left on the ground to biodegrade, but Green Banana Paper saw an entrepreneurial opportunity with environmental and social benefits. Founded by New England native Matt Simpson, the social enterprise produces strong and water-resistant wallets with designs inspired by the coconut palms, ocean life, and people of Micronesia. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSM_TYaT5Kg Related: Thai Building Facade Handmade From Natural Banana Fiber “Green Banana Paper wallets are not only ecofriendly; they are helping to provide a living wage to Kosraean families,” says the company. “Matt hopes to continue to scale up production, and get even more people on the island involved in this truly community-oriented business.” Green Banana Paper has launched a Kickstarter to raise funds for hiring more people and improving the quality of their products. Supporters of the project can also receive their own banana fiber wallet, which can be shipped around the world. + Green Banana Paper Kickstarter

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See how banana trees are recycled into vegan leather wallets in Micronesia

Plants grow and chickens roam inside this barn turned artist studio

August 18, 2016 by  
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The studio sits on a vineyard in Sebastopol , blending with the surroundings thanks to its vernacular architecture. The restored 2500 square foot building shelters an artist studio, office and storage building, and was clad using the old barn’s wood. Its inverted gabled-roof adds a contemporary twist, while enhancing the interiors with double height areas – making it perfect for exhibiting the owner’s works. Related: Takeshi Hosaka’s Inside-Out House has Trees Growing Inside! A contrasting modern structure shaped like a white amoeba flows outward from the main building, creating additional living space. Pockets of green flourish on the floor, and the interiors receive plenty of daylight through a skylight placed above a scissor-beam ceiling. Right on the edge, glazed sliding doors bring the outdoors in quite literally — cats, dogs and chicken are very welcome to roam free inside. + Mork-Ulnes Architects Via Blog Gessato Photos by  Bruce Damonte  and Grant Harder

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Plants grow and chickens roam inside this barn turned artist studio

Basurama transforms landfill trash into playgrounds in Taipei

August 2, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFs4FqOuI58 Founded in 2001, the Basurama artist collective has worked around the world developing innovative uses for waste to raise awareness about the benefits of reuse and the ills of a throwaway consumerist society. Re-create Taipei was created in collaboration with Taiwan-based AGUA Design’s City Yeast as part of an International Open Call program hosted by the World Design Capital, a biennial city promotion project hosted this year by Taipei. The design studios constructed two temporary playground sites in a central location near Zhongxiao Xinsheng. As their name implies (‘basura’ is the Spanish word for trash), Basurama primarily uses locally found, discarded materials as their preferred building medium. “We always try to work with local materials,” said Mónica Gutiérrez Herrero in an interview with Inhabitat. “So, in this case it is our first time working with water tanks because it’s the first time we’re in a country that uses it. So we are really happy to experiment and learn from new materials because although we have been working now for 15 years, we learn in each project.” The unique and site-specific Re-Create Taipei playgrounds were built in ten days following a nine-month design and planning process that involved site selection, material collection, and community engagement. Related: 9 gorgeous green designs by Taiwanese creatives The Re-create Taipei playground that Inhabitat visited comprises four main play components: a ball pit, a labyrinth, a tunnel, and a slide house. Upcycled water tanks form the skeleton for all the play areas and are supplemented with other found materials. The water tank labyrinth, for instance, is covered in a variety of textures including bubble wrap, astroturf, a chalkboard surface, tree bark, and more. The second site, located nearby in an underpass, features swings made from discarded street lamps. The “trash” playgrounds are a temporary urban installation and will stay onsite until the conclusion of the World Design Capital later this year. + Basurama + AGUA DESIGN Images © Lucy Wang

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Basurama transforms landfill trash into playgrounds in Taipei

Sydney artist upcycles wooden blinds into beautiful pendant lamps

August 1, 2016 by  
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Adrian was inspired to create upcycled lighting after he moved to Australia in 2009 and noticed how people were throwing out wooden blinds that were still of good quality. Rather than let the material rot in a landfill , he rescued the blinds and began tinkering with ways to transform them into wooden light fittings. “What initially seemed a simple idea soon proved difficult,” says Adrian. “Most of the blinds [I found] came from different manufacturers who had different specifications and every set had been custom made to suit each house so were different to the next lot. All of this complicated things because the wood slats all had to be machined to a standard size to make a commercially viable product.” Related: Steampunk-inspired lamps are crafted from over a hundred washing machines As a result, Adrian built his own jig that allowed him to process wood slats up to 2.5 meters in length. He also set up a partnership with a local blind repairer and manufacturer who, instead of tossing unwanted components in the trash, now give those parts to Adrian. Once Adrian is finished processing the wood slats, he sends them back to the manufacturer to be finished, a process he describes as the “perfect cost-saving business arrangement.” Adrian’s Avalon pendant lamp series can be purchased online from his website and are available in 12 different styles. + Adrian Lawson Images via Adrian Lawson

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Sydney artist upcycles wooden blinds into beautiful pendant lamps

Charming upcycled Igloo parklet brings the community together with a place to leave wishes

June 27, 2016 by  
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The Wish-Igloo parklet is part of the Renaissance Covington’s Curb’d program which focuses on temporarily repurposing parking spaces throughout the city. It was selected as one of five winning entries to the design-build competition, all of which are based on the idea of repurposing small chunks of urban space into engaging spatial experiments. Related: Mini Gabion Parklet pops up in a Brazilian neighborhood The structure is installed in front of Left Bank Coffeehouse in Covington, where it will stay throughout the summer. Passersby and customers of the coffee house can pin their wishes to the fabric of the Wish-Igloo and move its operable panels to personalize the space. Related: Portable ParkedBench parklet injects a breath of fresh air in London The upcycling design strategy the architects deployed is reflected in every aspect of the project, which comprises a curved roof structure with a single steel spine, together with laminated ribs made of marine grade plywood. Every element of the structure -from planters and timber ribs, to steel components – can be upcycled. This philosophy includes the timber flooring and decking which the team reused from an old barn in Ohio. + fieldCRAFTstudio

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Charming upcycled Igloo parklet brings the community together with a place to leave wishes

hearO is a discarded tennis ball turned into a Bluetooth speaker

June 15, 2016 by  
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Consider what happens to the thousands of tennis balls that are left over after a major professional tennis tournament. For Wimbledon alone, Slazenger supplies over 55,000 balls each year. If you include all the major tournaments around the world, 230,000 championship tennis balls are discarded annually. hearO brings this memorabilia to life, imbues it with energy and makes it a useful wireless speaker for everyday life. A tennis ball is a perfect ergonomic object and is covered in a tactile felt that is exceedingly durable. hearO uses these properties to create a portable Bluetooth speaker that blends usability and sustainability with a refined aesthetic. The product fuses into an ideal portable media companion. + hearO

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hearO is a discarded tennis ball turned into a Bluetooth speaker

Ammar Kalo upcycles textile waste into beautiful resin stools

June 15, 2016 by  
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Designer Ammar Kalo has found a beautiful new use for discarded textiles in [Fabric]ations, a series of resin stools topped with colorful pieces of fabric. After the fabric is carefully arranged by hand, Kalo traps the pieces of cloth in resin that’s cured until solid. The low-tech production requires few raw materials. “While the prototypes are produced using general purpose polyester resin, the intention is to make larger quantities using green resin, bio plastic, or bio resin in order to make a more ‘green’ product,” says Kalo. + Ammar Kalo The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Ammar Kalo upcycles textile waste into beautiful resin stools

Designer couple upcycles neglected and worn out tires into colorful Tyrochairs

June 7, 2016 by  
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Industrial designers and real-life couple, Abishek and Bhawana created Tyrochair as a solution for upcycling neglected and worn out tires and reducing waste. During the initial phases of the project’s R&D, the designer duo came across various horrifying details about tire disposal. Common methods of tire disposal include burning or illegally dumping tires, which in addition to polluting the water, air, and soil, and hazardous to human health. To create the Tyrochair , Abiskek and Bhawana designed a robust metal framework to provide maximum seating support. After cleaning and painting the tires, the couple inserted a radial-woven seat, made out nylon (for maximum bounce) and recycled nylon ropes for an eco-friendly, dense weave. Tyrochair has led the couple to follow their passion for upcycling discarded products and embark on other ventures. “Punahveen (revival of discarded items) – An Upcycle Café” is their newest initiative in their journey towards making the world a better place to live in. Through Punahveen, the couple has created an exquisite upcycled range of home décor, utility and lifestyle products keeping an emphasis on sound environmental practices. Their design consultancy “Welava Design” aims to offer functional and aesthetically pleasing products leveraging the upcycling process. + Welava Design The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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