Steve Areen’s incredible DIY wagon home built with mostly recycled materials

February 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Steve Areen’s incredible DIY wagon home built with mostly recycled materials

Steve Areen is one of those people who turns everything into gold. And by gold, I mean magic. I mean soul. We saw it with his lovely dome home in Thailand , and now, what was supposed to be a simple dwelling in Australia evolved into an extraordinary modern caravan that he built by hand with mostly recycled materials . The roaming flight attendant, 52, started with a 5×10 trailer, to which a local artisan helped add a curved steel frame. Then the muse stepped in. Complete with custom furniture, a round window seat and wood-fired stove, the cylindrical Unity Wagon — perched on Yandoit Farm about 80 miles northwest of Melbourne — will set your tiny home-heart on fire. Read on for a closer look at some of the details that give Steve’s latest project such charm. Steve says he has been living part-time on Yandoit Farm for the last few years. “My friends Michael and Lisa, with help from volunteers from around the world, are doing an amazing job transforming what was once a dried up ranch into a lush organic farm, using permaculture principles,” he adds. So, he decided to build a small structure that keeps bugs and snakes at bay (the experience with a poisonous snake in his bed elsewhere in Australia probably a motivating factor). As we now know about Steve, he loves curvy structures, which have a range of benefits . For him, it’s about the look, feel and “amazing energy”. He told Inhabitat, “I decided to make my own version of a covered wagon, with a pulley system that made it easy to roll the canvas all the way up and a strap that pulls it down back down. I had never seen this done before, but it sure worked well in my head.” Starting with the shiplap timber cladding, all discards from a local mill, Steve sanded and oiled each piece by hand. He said some of the worst-looking boards ended up being the most beautiful after a bit of tender loving care, though attaching the warped pieces to the steel skeleton was sometimes tricky. The name Unity Wagon was inspired by the way the various Australian hardwoods, each with their own history, came together. The double wall allowed him to create round cutouts that also serve as storage and lighting, as well as his signature round window seat. These details combined with rope trimming gives the caravan something of a nautical aesthetic , he tells Living Big in a Tiny House in the above video. Related: Magical dome home in Thailand constructed in six weeks for just $8000 He calls his bed “optimistic”. Normally, it’s sized for a single person. But if he has company, he can expand it, sliding out the base and adding a couple of cushions. This extends to guests as well. Since the caravan is parked on the farm, he hopes other people will be able to enjoy the use of it, with all proceeds going to either educational programs or more “fun structures.” And when he is around, a sliding table pulls out between two benches covered in richly-hued fabrics, providing enough space for up to seven people to sit and share a meal. A full blown party on the cards? No problem. Unity Wagon was built for play. Steve promotes climbing on the roof and in general having fun in and with the space. At some point, he hopes to take his tiny home to festivals. A work in progress, and an artwork at that, Unity Wagon isn’t designed for full-time living. Steve can use the stovetop to boil water and other basics, and he left room to install a cooking stove, but for now he has to use the farm’s ablutions (hot water powered by a giant compost pile – yay!) A small solar system provides power for the interior lighting. But because his home is small and compact, with plenty of crafty storage nooks, he doesn’t need much else. On a clear day, it’s possible to completely open the wagon to the elements. If the insects are out in force, Steve has fly screens secured tightly with velcro, and with any hint of inclement weather, he can pull the canvas cover in a jiffy. On his first night in the completed caravan, he left the cover off, sleeping under a sweep of stars. All told, it cost under $15,000 to build the wagon, much of which went to skilled labor. Despite some frustrating moments, Steve describes the months he spent working solo in an open hay shed, dreaming up new ideas and solutions, as “crazy fun.” And this won’t be the last we’ll see of him. “Though I have no interest in being in the building business,” he says, “I do look forward to building more fun structures, ones that keep people connected to nature, are interactive and of course… curvy.” + Steve Areen All images by Steve Areen

More:
Steve Areen’s incredible DIY wagon home built with mostly recycled materials

Beautiful cedar-clad Bridge House crosses a ravine in Ontario

February 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Beautiful cedar-clad Bridge House crosses a ravine in Ontario

This elegant  timber house bridges a ravine near the shores of Mary Lake in Port Sydney, Ontario. Architecture firm LLAMA urban design created the inspiring home to have minimal impact on the landscape and to celebrate the beauty of the surrounding environment. The house is located two hours north of Toronto , and it sits across the steepest part of a wide ravine. Its overall length – 124 feet – creates a strong linear gesture that allows the residents to immerse themselves in the surrounding landscape. The home is held aloft by an inverted V–shaped glulam structure, and the architects used locally sourced wood and unstained cedar siding for the exterior cladding. Related: This Iowa home built across a ravine is heated and cooled by the earth The main façade of the house faces the lake and creates a feeling of being among treetops. The second façade faces the forest and features expansive transparent surfaces. An inverted V–shaped Glulam structure holds up the house and connects the interior social area with the roof deck. + LLAMA urban design Via Archdaily Photos by A-Frame studio/ Ben Rahn

Read more:
Beautiful cedar-clad Bridge House crosses a ravine in Ontario

Amazing new biodegradable insulation only burns after one-hour of fire exposure

February 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Amazing new biodegradable insulation only burns after one-hour of fire exposure

100 percent natural insulation from Chilean company Rootman is also resistant to flames, according to ArchDaily . Rootman’s product, Thermoroot, absorbs sound and provides optimal thermal performance — and, according to its designers, the sustainable insulation only starts burning 60 minutes of fire exposure. That’s in contrast to polystyrene , fiberglass, or polyurethane, which will start burning in three seconds, 15 seconds, or one minute, respectively. With the goal of insulating buildings more efficiently, Rootman created Thermoroot, which they say is biodegradable , comprised of 100 percent natural fiber, and won’t harm the environment . They basically grow what they call a Radicular Mattress; in isolated chambers, they hydroponically cultivate oat or barley grain seeds in trays that, according to ArchDaily, “define the required thickness of the roots ” to create the mattress. The process takes between 10 and 15 days, and Rootman doesn’t employ chemical additives or draw on genetic modifications. Related: Hemp-based insulation makes a comeback in Belgium The germination process can happen in any geographical location or climate, according to ArchDaily. It boasts a low water and carbon footprint, doesn’t pollute, and trees don’t need to be cut down for the process. And in case of a fire, the green insulation offers a one-hour window before it burns. Thermoroot can entirely replace conventional insulators like Mineral Wool, Expanded Polystyrene, or Polyurethane, according to ArchDaily, thermally and acoustically insulating floors, ceilings, or walls. The publication said Rootman is working to offer an effective alternative for expensive natural insulators and synthetic insulators that are harmful for health and the environment. If you’d like more information, Rootman includes links to a technical information PDF, certification of sound absorption, a thermal conductivity certification, and a firefighters’ technical report on their website; you can find those here . The company also says their technology could serve as “a soil improver for the garden and agriculture .” + Rootman Via ArchDaily Images via Rootman SpA/ArchDaily

Read the original: 
Amazing new biodegradable insulation only burns after one-hour of fire exposure

Gorgeous roof garden feeds owners in proposed off-grid Yin & Yang House

February 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous roof garden feeds owners in proposed off-grid Yin & Yang House

Architecture studio Penda unveiled designs for an off-grid home Kassel, Germany with a stunning rooftop garden . Commissioned by a young family who wants to produce most of their own food, the Yin & Yang house features a minimal timber structure with a terraced roof curved in a shape evocative of the yin yang symbol. As shown in the startlingly realistic renderings, Yin & Yang House occupies a small corner lot. With very little ground space for a garden, Penda turned the roof into two terraced garden spaces to meet the client’s desires for a space to grow fruit, vegetables, and herbs. Rainwater will be collected on the roof and used for irrigation. Related: Trees to grow on the balconies of Penda’s timber high-rise in Toronto The eye-catching and seasonally changing roof is balanced by the building’s minimalist and boxy timber form. The two-story home features a garage, office space, kids’ bedroom, bathroom, master bedroom, and the kitchen and dining area on the ground floor, while the second floor includes additional sitting areas and a secondary workspace accessible by two separate staircases. Large windows let in natural light and views of the outdoors, with beautiful views of the terraced roof garden from the second floor spaces. + Penda Via Dezeen

Here is the original:
Gorgeous roof garden feeds owners in proposed off-grid Yin & Yang House

Bad Behavior has blocked 7352 access attempts in the last 7 days.