Clothing made from recycled water bottles highlights the ongoing crisis in Flint

April 20, 2018 by  
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A new fashion exhibit in Queens underscores the ongoing water-contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan . “Flint Fit” comprises a series of garments inspired by the “power and necessity of water, manufacturing history of Flint, and resiliency” of the people of Flint, who have had to cope with the effects of lead poisoning since 2014. Visual artist Mel Chin  — with an assist from Michigan-born, New York City–based fashion designer Tracy Reese —  conceived of the clothing to highlight the water crisis. Flint has had to resort to bottled water for everything from drinking to bathing, which has also created a tragically bountiful waste stream. Chin enlisted Unifi , which makes recycled textiles, to clean, shred and transform more than 90,000 used water bottles into a performance fabric known as Repreve . To manifest Reese’s designs, Chin turned to the commercial sewing program at St Luke N.E.W. Life Center  in Flint, where at-risk women stitched the pieces. The items include a trench coat, a wide-leg jumpsuit and swimwear. Chin said, “By opening the door for new ideas, Flint Fit aims to stimulate creative production, economic opportunity and empowerment on a local scale.” Jay Hertwig, Unifi’s group vice president for global brand sales, said the brand was “proud to be a part of this exciting moment in art-fashion history.” He continued, “At Unifi, we’re able to transform plastic bottles into Repreve for products that people enjoy every day. And we’re thrilled that Repreve is playing a key role in such a positive movement that came from something so catastrophic.” Part of Chin’s All Over the Place exhibit at Queens Museum , “Flint Fit” will be on display through August 12, 2018. + Flint Fit + Queens Museum

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Clothing made from recycled water bottles highlights the ongoing crisis in Flint

Inside Unifi, Where Old Plastic Becomes New Fabric

September 19, 2013 by  
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This year, North Carolina textile manufacturer Unifi has already recycled 400 million plastic water bottles into yarn. Because of interest from Unifi’s customers, the recycled yarn business has grown tremendously over the past five years.

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Inside Unifi, Where Old Plastic Becomes New Fabric

Rio de Janeiro Lays Down the Law on Littering

September 19, 2013 by  
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Stiff fines await those who litter in Rio, as the city cleans up its act in advance of the World Cup and Summer Olympics.

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Rio de Janeiro Lays Down the Law on Littering

Ford to Recycle 2 Million Plastic Bottles Into Fabric for Its Focus Electric

January 9, 2012 by  
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In the run-up to this year’s North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) , Ford announced a plan to recycle around 2 million used plastic bottles for use in its Focus Electric vehicle. The plastic will be diverted from landfills and converted into REPREVE fabric that can be used for seating in the  Focus . Done in collaboration with REPREVE’s makers at Unifi, the company will be carrying out their plan by first collecting used plastic bottles at this week’s NAIAS in Detroit. Read the rest of Ford to Recycle 2 Million Plastic Bottles Into Fabric for Its Focus Electric Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2 million plastic bottles recycled , detroit auto show 2012 , focus electric , ford , green car technology , north american auto show , recycling plastic bottles , repreve , unifi

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Ford to Recycle 2 Million Plastic Bottles Into Fabric for Its Focus Electric

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