3,000-year-old underwater castle discovered in Turkey’s largest lake

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 3,000-year-old underwater castle discovered in Turkey’s largest lake

Turkey ‘s Lake Van is the country’s biggest – but that isn’t the lake’s only claim to fame. Van Yüzüncü Yil University archaeologists and a team of divers recently discovered an underwater fortress there. The ancient nation of Urartu could have built the castle roughly around 3,000 years ago during the Iron Age. The team explored the lake based on local rumors of ancient ruins, despite other archaeologists familiar with the area telling them they probably wouldn’t find much. But it was the rumors that turned out to be correct: diving team head Tahsin Ceylan told Turkey’s newswire service Andalou Agency the archaeological site is around one kilometer, or a little over half a mile, large. The fortress’ walls that they can see are between 10 to 13 feet in size. Related: Haunting drowned figures send a chilling message in Europe’s first undersea sculpture museum Some of the remains are loose piles of stones, others are smooth walls, according to National Geographic . Visual assessments led the team to estimate the underwater castle is around 3,000 years old. It would have been built when the lake’s water level was hundreds of meters lower. According to ScienceAlert , Lake Van’s water levels have fluctuated dramatically throughout the years. Urartu, a kingdom that flourished between the ninth and sixth centuries BCE, was centered around Lake Van, according to the Metropolitan Museum of Art . Other archaeological remains in the area, some higher than the current shoreline, are also the subject of study. And archaeologists and divers plan to return to the lake the learn more about the recently found sunken fortress. They’re not yet sure how deep the walls might be buried in lake floor sediment, and hope to learn more about the people who inhabited the castle. Via National Geographic and ScienceAlert Images via National Geographic on YouTube

Go here to read the rest:
3,000-year-old underwater castle discovered in Turkey’s largest lake

Picturesque Swiss Alps town wants to pay new residents to move there

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Picturesque Swiss Alps town wants to pay new residents to move there

A two-week vacation in the Alps is great, sure. But what about a 10-year stay where you’ll be paid to sip hot cocoa in a charming chalet settled amongst snow-capped mountains? Indeed, as Travel+Leisure  shares, the tiny Swiss village of Albinen, near Leukerbad in the canton of Valais is offering new residents a hefty annual paycheck—25,000 francs (or $25,200 USD) per adult and 10,000 francs ($10,000 USD) per child to be exact—to live in their dreamy village for at least a decade. Like many small towns across Europe and the U.S., Albinen has seen their population dip over the last few years as residents, particularly families, have left for larger cities. As Swiss site The Local  reports, three families have moved from Albinen recently, including eight children. While these numbers will seem negligible to most of us, the loss forced the local school to close. As it stands, there are just 240 residents remaining and they are demanding officials save the village from demise. As such, the village council proposed the pay-to-stay measure which will be voted on November 30, 2017. Related: Italy is giving away hundreds of historic castles and villas for free Of course, there are several caveats for applicants. First, you must be under 45 years old. Secondly, the property you chose must be valued at no less than 200,000 francs ($201,600 USD). And again, you’ll need to commit at least 10 years to the village and make it your permanent place of residence. If you break the agreement (i.e. leave before your decade is up), you’ll have to repay the town all the money they invested in you. Although modest, Albinen offers clean streets and some nice amenities, including a spa.  The village is also sited near several larger towns. Plus you can’t argue those spectacular views of the Alps. Really, could you ask for a better Instagram shot? Via Travel+Leisure via  The Local Images via WikiCommons and Google Maps

Read more here: 
Picturesque Swiss Alps town wants to pay new residents to move there

NASA video shows dramatic shift in Earth’s seasons as a result of climate change

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NASA video shows dramatic shift in Earth’s seasons as a result of climate change

It can be hard to visualize just how much climate change has impacted Earth’s seasons. To help, NASA released a new illustration that drives home the dramatic shift that has taken place over a few short decades. So, when you are sitting around the table with your climate change -denying relatives this week, just show them this. Touted as the most complete view of biology on Earth to date, the visualization takes data from satellites since 1997 to create a comprehensive view of the changing planet. Most obvious is the way the seasons have shifted: spring arrives earlier as time progresses, and fall stays later. You can also see algal blooms grow and shrink, and the snow and glaciers gradually recede with each year. Related: NASA map shows how climate change has set the world on fire “These are incredibly evocative visualizations of our living planet,” said Gene Carl Feldman, an oceanographer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center . “That’s the Earth, that is it breathing every single day, changing with the seasons, responding to the Sun, to the changing winds, ocean currents and temperatures.” Via The Guardian

Read the original here: 
NASA video shows dramatic shift in Earth’s seasons as a result of climate change

VIDEO: 60,000-year-old preserved underwater forest discovered in the Gulf of Mexico

September 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on VIDEO: 60,000-year-old preserved underwater forest discovered in the Gulf of Mexico

When Hurricane Ivan formed in 2004, it did more than devastate regions of the Caribbean and the United States’ coast. According to the new documentary “ The Underwater Forest ,” it also unearthed a fossilized forest of cypress trees which grew more than 50,000 years ago. Located 60 feet below the surface in the Gulf of Mexico , the underwater forest features trees which have intact bark and are still leaking sap. Journalist Ben Raines discovered the underwater forest after conversing with fishermen who reported “unusual” activity in the area. The preserved forest is expected to have been buried by sediment, which protected it from decomposition, as a result of the last ice age which occurred approximately 60,000 years ago. After Hurricane Ivan uncovered the forest, it transformed into a flourishing ecosystem. Said Professor Kristine DeLong, an LSU Department of Geography & Anthropology Associate, “Everything is in place in that ecosystem . It’s just been buried and preserved through time.” The trees were prevented from decomposing due to the presence of thick mud. Without oxygen , decomposition could not occur in the underwater environment. However, the Category 4 hurricane — which had 140-mile per hour winds and 98-foot-tall waves — changed that in 2004. Related: Report: meat industry responsible for largest-ever ‘dead zone’ in the Gulf of Mexico Raines worked with scientists from Louisiana State University and the University of Southern Mississippi for the first samples and subsequent investigations. Using advanced sonar machines, the researchers discovered additional trees which are still buried approximately 10 feet below the sediment. The experts also used radio-carbon dating to discern the forests’ approximate age. Reportedly, the trees show signs of “stress events.” This indicates that the trees experienced a rapid decrease in growth, followed by a quick increase, then a swift, final growth decline. The experts agree that the trees soon after died around the same time. Due to pollution — which includes run-off and oil spills — the Gulf of Mexico is becoming more toxic every year. This newly-discovered ecosystem could provide a glimpse of the future of the Gulf coast, say the researchers. “It’s pretty rapid change, geologically speaking,” said paleontologist Martin Becker of William Paterson University. “We’re looking at 60 feet of seawater where a forest used to be. I’m looking at a lot of development, of people’s shore homes and condominiums, etc. The forest is predicting the future, and maybe a pretty unpleasant one.” + The Underwater Forest Via AL , Daily Mail Images via The Underwater Forest/Ben Raines

Here is the original: 
VIDEO: 60,000-year-old preserved underwater forest discovered in the Gulf of Mexico

Ingenious hand-pumped Scorkl lets you breathe underwater for 10 minutes

June 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ingenious hand-pumped Scorkl lets you breathe underwater for 10 minutes

Scuba  diving may seem like too much of a hassle, what with all the equipment, training and money you need to make it happen. A new product – that’s like something straight out of a James Bond movie – called  Scorkl  opens up the underwater world by combining the best of scuba diving with the ease of snorkeling. A hand pump refills the underwater breathing device that’s roughly the size of a water bottle, giving you 10 minutes of uninhibited exploration. The Scorkl is a lightweight device you put to your mouth to breath in air while underwater – no scuba diving certification necessary. The Australia -based company says their cylinder is manufactured to the same standards and specifications as a cylinder you’d use to scuba dive, but it can be refilled with a Scorkl hand pump. The device also comes with a scuba tank refill adapter so it can be refilled from a scuba tank. A pressure gauge on the Scorkl lets users know how much air they have left – they’ll be able to swim freely through the water for around 10 minutes. Related: The Easybreath Snorkel Mask Lets You Breathe Comfortably Through Your Nose Underwater Scorkl is crowdfunding on Kickstarter , and it appears there are a bunch of people out there who are drawn to the freedom offered by the device – the company set their goal at $22,765 but have already raised over $370,000. One Scorkl costs $199 – that’s 33 percent off the retail price. A Scorkl and pump are being offered at a discount price of $398. At this point you’re probably wondering about safety . The company says the Scorkl is safe and can be used by anyone, but untrained divers should be cautious when swimming with it, and shouldn’t go below 9.8 feet in depth or use it more than five times in a single day. Trained divers should be able to go further than 9.8 feet drawing on what they learned during their certification process. The device is accompanied by an information kit warning users and offering tips to avoid pulmonary damage. The company says the Scorkl is designed for shallow diving , and they recommend not using it below 32 feet, even though it technically can go to depths of around 65 feet. You can check out the campaign here . + Scorkl Images via Scorkl Facebook

Original post: 
Ingenious hand-pumped Scorkl lets you breathe underwater for 10 minutes

Egypt hopes to build the world’s first underwater museum in Alexandria

November 5, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Egypt hopes to build the world’s first underwater museum in Alexandria

The Ministry of Antiquities in Egypt has been working towards the creation of an undersea museum around ancient ruins submerged in the Bay of Alexandria. The plan began in 1998 and has run into a variety of obstacles, but project developers hope to move forward soon. With an architect on board and the people of Egypt hopeful to see the museum built, the project could be close to making tangible progress. The site might become the world’s first underwater museum, if the planners can overcome numerous project delays. Read the rest of Egypt hopes to build the world’s first underwater museum in Alexandria

Here is the original:
Egypt hopes to build the world’s first underwater museum in Alexandria

Underwater “Stonehenge” discovered near Sicily is over 10,000-years-old

August 7, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Underwater “Stonehenge” discovered near Sicily is over 10,000-years-old

Off the coast of Sicily, researchers have discovered a giant stone monolith submerged in a shallow channel. A report published in Science Direct suggests the man-made object was created by an ancient civilization for a purpose likely akin to that of Stonehenge, which the monolith resembles. Researchers estimate the monument’s age at over 10,000 years, and believe its existence confirms “significant Mesolithic human activity in the Sicilian Channel region.” Read the rest of Underwater “Stonehenge” discovered near Sicily is over 10,000-years-old

More here:
Underwater “Stonehenge” discovered near Sicily is over 10,000-years-old

Turkey Unveils the World’s First Intercontinental Underwater Rail Tunnel

January 31, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Turkey Unveils the World’s First Intercontinental Underwater Rail Tunnel

The ambitious idea to link Europe and Asia via a sea tunnel was first conceived in 1860 by a sultan of the Ottoman Empire, but Abdoul Medjid lacked the technology and funds to turn the idea into reality. In 2004, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, who was then mayor of Istanbul, revived the plan along with other excessive ideas such as a third airport, a parallel canal and a third bridge. These ambitious projects, which locals blame for the destruction of green spaces and the loss of homes, helped to fuel mass anti-government protests across the country earlier this year. Read the rest of Turkey Unveils the World’s First Intercontinental Underwater Rail Tunnel Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Abdoul Medjid , anti-government riots in Istanbul , Bosphorus Strait , Erdogan angers locals , First Intercontinental Sea Tunnel , major archaeological discoveries , Ottoman Empire , Sea Tunnel Links Europe and Asia , Sea Tunnel will relieve Istanbul’s congestion

Continued here:
Turkey Unveils the World’s First Intercontinental Underwater Rail Tunnel

Tiny Off-Grid Le Tronc Creux Shelters Blend into Bordeaux’s Forests Like Old Tree Trunks

January 31, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tiny Off-Grid Le Tronc Creux Shelters Blend into Bordeaux’s Forests Like Old Tree Trunks

Read the rest of Tiny Off-Grid Le Tronc Creux Shelters Blend into Bordeaux’s Forests Like Old Tree Trunks Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bordeaux architecture , Bordeaux forests , Bruit Du Frigo , cylindrical tiny houses , French architects , Le Tronc Creux Shelters , off the grid home , off-the-grid homes , Refuge Périurbain Bordeaux , suburban refuges , tiny homes , tiny shelters

Originally posted here:
Tiny Off-Grid Le Tronc Creux Shelters Blend into Bordeaux’s Forests Like Old Tree Trunks

Watch Explosive Underwater Shockwaves INSTANTLY Turn Vegetables Into Juice

September 4, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Watch Explosive Underwater Shockwaves INSTANTLY Turn Vegetables Into Juice

Move over Breville – making great juice just got a whole lot more exciting. Japanese food company Kagome has found a way to transform fruits and vegetables into juice using explosive underwater shockwaves! In a stunt video (which contains plenty of questionable science), Kagome shows a tomato being liquified on the inside while the outside remains intact – all it takes to savor the juice is piercing the skin with a straw! Read the rest of Watch Explosive Underwater Shockwaves INSTANTLY Turn Vegetables Into Juice Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: fruit , juice , juicer , Juicing , kagome , shockwaves , tomato , underwater , vegetable

Read the original here:
Watch Explosive Underwater Shockwaves INSTANTLY Turn Vegetables Into Juice

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1667 access attempts in the last 7 days.