Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

August 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

Depending on the administration, environmental regulatory compliance can be a moving target. Compliance with environmental regulations is considered a baseline. But if you go above and beyond regulations, can that ultimately make life easier for you and your organization? Regardless of your role in environmental management, you probably tracked the regulatory rollbacks enacted during the Trump administration and wondered what changes will occur under the Biden administration. The answer is clear: The Biden administration appears to be calling for an environmental renaissance. Do you have the corporate backing and the regulatory mandate to develop strategies for not only achieving environmental compliance but also for setting environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals and policies that go beyond compliance? This Insight Report examines: The United States’ new international policy on climate change. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) specific actions to counteract regulatory rollbacks from the Trump administration. What this environmental renaissance means for companies.

Read more here:
Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

August 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

Depending on the administration, environmental regulatory compliance can be a moving target. Compliance with environmental regulations is considered a baseline. But if you go above and beyond regulations, can that ultimately make life easier for you and your organization? Regardless of your role in environmental management, you probably tracked the regulatory rollbacks enacted during the Trump administration and wondered what changes will occur under the Biden administration. The answer is clear: The Biden administration appears to be calling for an environmental renaissance. Do you have the corporate backing and the regulatory mandate to develop strategies for not only achieving environmental compliance but also for setting environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals and policies that go beyond compliance? This Insight Report examines: The United States’ new international policy on climate change. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) specific actions to counteract regulatory rollbacks from the Trump administration. What this environmental renaissance means for companies.

Originally posted here:
Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

August 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

Depending on the administration, environmental regulatory compliance can be a moving target. Compliance with environmental regulations is considered a baseline. But if you go above and beyond regulations, can that ultimately make life easier for you and your organization? Regardless of your role in environmental management, you probably tracked the regulatory rollbacks enacted during the Trump administration and wondered what changes will occur under the Biden administration. The answer is clear: The Biden administration appears to be calling for an environmental renaissance. Do you have the corporate backing and the regulatory mandate to develop strategies for not only achieving environmental compliance but also for setting environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals and policies that go beyond compliance? This Insight Report examines: The United States’ new international policy on climate change. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) specific actions to counteract regulatory rollbacks from the Trump administration. What this environmental renaissance means for companies.

Go here to read the rest:
Biden’s Environmental Renaissance: 2021 and Beyond

Can circular cities boost biodiversity?

July 30, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Can circular cities boost biodiversity?

Aside from preserving the last remaining natural places, we need to create new ones — especially in cities.

Read the original post:
Can circular cities boost biodiversity?

Can circular cities boost biodiversity?

July 30, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Can circular cities boost biodiversity?

Aside from preserving the last remaining natural places, we need to create new ones — especially in cities.

View post:
Can circular cities boost biodiversity?

A world of possibilities to weather the perfect storm

July 29, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on A world of possibilities to weather the perfect storm

GreenBiz Default Summary

Continued here:
A world of possibilities to weather the perfect storm

Trump’s DOE invests $62 million in concentrated solar power

September 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Trump’s DOE invests $62 million in concentrated solar power

President Donald Trump doesn’t usually mention solar power , unless it’s talk of covering his beloved border wall in solar panels . But his Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced a huge investment in concentrated solar power (CSP). Recently, the solar industry  reached the 2020 SunShot Initiative utility-scale solar cost goal, so the DOE is now looking into new priorities for investment. The DOE recently issued a press release stating they’ll invest up to $82 million in research: $62 million for CSP and $20 million in power electronics technologies, focusing on new technologies now that the average price for utility-scale solar is now six cents per kilowatt-hour. The MIT Technology Review suggested DOE officials think CSP could enhance grid stability more in the long term since CSP plants can store some power as heat, allowing them to keep producing electricity when there’s no sunshine. Related: Dubai to build the world’s biggest concentrated solar power plant But the energy CSP plants generate has been costlier than photovoltaics . And according to the MIT Technology Review, some people are suspicious the DOE may move to weaken support for photovoltaics. The Trump administration’s 2018 budget proposal slashed funding for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by almost 70 percent. That’s the same office that manages the SunShot Initiative. The DOE also announced a $50 million funding opportunity for large-scale pilot fossil fuel projects in late August. But CSP’s ability to store power is a strong advantage. Energy policy researcher David Victor of the University of California, San Diego did say investing in CSP makes sense, telling MIT Technology Review, “My general impression is that we have relatively over-invested in photovoltaics and under-invested in [concentrated solar].” Dan Reicher, executive director at Stanford University’s Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, told MIT Technology Review, “[Concentrated solar power] today hasn’t been able to compete with photovoltaics, but there are some promising research areas. Given the climate challenge, we need to put eggs in many, many zero-carbon baskets.” Via MIT Technology Review and the Department of Energy Images via Bureau of Land Management on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

The rest is here: 
Trump’s DOE invests $62 million in concentrated solar power

Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

August 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

An anonymous official revealed two weeks ago that Trump intends to decimate the “crown jewel” of the national refuge system in order to build his border wall. Now, the Department of Homeland Security has announced it would disregard dozens of environmental rules in order to rush construction, which could start as soon as January. Workers have already been on site to prepare for building. The government is allowed to waive environmental requirements in order to build infrastructure, including skirting the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act. In order to avoid dealing with private land owners, Trump’s wall is slated to start in the Santa Ana refuge, and while building in any refuge would be awful for the environment, the Sant Ana refuge is particularly devastating because it is home to the endangered ocelot, jaguar and jaguarondi. It is also one of the most cherished bird refuges in the US. “The lower Rio Grande is a national treasure for birds,” said Michael J. Parr, President of American Bird Conservancy . Related: “Crown jewel” wildlife refuge to be decimated as Trump starts building border wall Funding for the wall has already been approved by the House and now it is heading to the Senate for approval. It includes a provision for rebuilding the wall in San Diego, which was built just a decade ago. “Replacing the San Diego border wall only a decade after it was built shows that the border wall has always been stupid, ineffective and incredibly expensive,” Brian Segee, attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity said. “Trump’s border wall would compound this travesty by dividing and destroying more communities, wildlife and wild places.” Meanwhile, one of the most incredible bird watching refuges in the US stands to be split in half by the wall unless the Senate is convinced to kill funding. Via Grist Images via Flickr , Wikimedia and Wikimedia

More here: 
Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

US DOI scientist claims he was reassigned for speaking up on climate change

July 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on US DOI scientist claims he was reassigned for speaking up on climate change

Is the Donald Trump administration reassigning employees who speak out on the dangers of climate change ? Joel Clement, former Office of Policy Analysis director at the Department of the Interior (DOI), seems to think so. He penned an opinion piece for The Washington Post saying he was moved into an “unrelated job in the accounting office.” He said he’s a scientist and policy expert, not an accountant – “…but you don’t have to be one to see that the administration’s excuse for a reassignment such as mine doesn’t add up.” Clement said he began working in the DOI almost seven years ago, and worked with communities in Alaska to help them prepare for the impacts of climate change. On June 15, he received a letter informing him of his reassignment to “improve talent development, mission delivery and collaboration.” He was one of around 50 senior employees to receive a letter, and was shuffled to the role of senior adviser in the Office of Natural Resources Revenue – an office he said gathers royalty checks from fossil fuel companies. Related: Trump launches “witch hunt” for government employees who worked on climate change policy Clement’s background is not in accounting. He has a Master of Environmental Studies degree in Forest Sciences and Canopy Biology from The Evergreen State College . But he said he spoke out on the challenges stemming from climate change that Alaska Native communities face in the months before his reassignment, even bringing the threat up with White House officials. Clement said in his op-ed, “It is clear to me that the administration was so uncomfortable with this work, and my disclosures, that I was reassigned with the intent to coerce me into leaving the federal government.” Indeed, a few days following his reassignment, new Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke testified before Congress that reassignments might be used to eliminate employees. Clement suggested Zinke might think fed-up employees might quit, and said he has colleagues who are being moved to other locations in the country, at taxpayer expense, to jobs that don’t align well with their skill set. Clement said the Kivalina, Shishmaref , and Shaktoolik villages are “one superstorm from being washed away.” He wrote, “I believe that every president, regardless of party, has the right and responsibility to implement his policies. But that is not what is happening here. Putting citizens in harm’s way isn’t the president’s right…The threat to these Alaska Native communities is not theoretical. This is not a policy debate.” Read Clement’s full piece here . Via The Washington Post Images via Wikimedia Commons and screenshot

Originally posted here: 
US DOI scientist claims he was reassigned for speaking up on climate change

"Crown jewel" wildlife refuge is about to be decimated as Trump starts border wall

July 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on "Crown jewel" wildlife refuge is about to be decimated as Trump starts border wall

A 2,000 acre wildlife area known as the “crown jewel” of the national refuge system is about to be gutted as Trump begins construction on his border wall . US Customs and Border patrol has quietly been preparing to start the 18-foot tall border wall in the Santa Ana National Refuge in southern Texas, according to an anonymous official. The refuge is home to 400 bird species and hundreds of animals, including the endangered ocelot – but if the wall is constructed as planned, it will decimate the sanctuary. UCB has been working quietly under the radar to start the project. One official, however, felt that the project shouldn’t start without public input. “This should be public information,” the official told the  Texas Observer . “There shouldn’t be government officials meeting in secret just so they don’t have to deal with the backlash. The public has the right to know about these plans.” Related: Mexican architect proposes stunning purple bridge in defiant response to Trump’s border wall The Department of Homeland Security picked the refuge as the place to start the border wall because it is already owned by the federal government, so there is no conflict with private land owners to worry about. This week, workers have been drilling to extract soil samples in order to prepare for construction, would could begin in January. The wall will be 18-feet-tall and 3-miles-long through the refuge. In order to accommodate a road along the south of the wall, along with light and surveillance towers, the refuge land will be cleared, devastating all fauna and flora. “Republicans are making a grave mistake supporting Trump’s bizarre fantasy of a border wall,” said Brian Segee, an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Throwing billions of dollars at the border wall boondoggle and demolishing an iconic wildlife refuge won’t make our country safer. But it will be a disaster for people and communities, and tragically sacrifice the fragile borderlands environment and endangered species like jaguars and ocelots.” Via the Texas Observer images via the US Fish and Wildlife Service

See original here:
"Crown jewel" wildlife refuge is about to be decimated as Trump starts border wall

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8344 access attempts in the last 7 days.