Breezy Brillhart Residence is designed to withstand global warming

August 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Breezy Brillhart Residence is designed to withstand global warming

Continued here:
Breezy Brillhart Residence is designed to withstand global warming

The world’s first analog 3D printer powered by gravity and weights

August 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The world’s first analog 3D printer powered by gravity and weights

The 3D printer has a 22lb. weight that is lifted to turn the machine on. The shape of an aluminum wire attached to the machine determines the outline of the 3D printed object. The wire can be modified for each print, allowing different variations of shapes and volumes. Although de Bruin’s 3D-printed objects seem a bit rudimentary, a completely mechanical 3D printer is a great alternative to the computerized and automated world we live in. Related: BigDelta machine 3D-prints durable, affordable houses from dirt The design also allows the designer to be involved throughout the 3D printing process, which is less possible with a machine powered by electricity. By physically building and powering the machine, the artist feels a greater sense of accomplishment about the resulting objects. + Daniel de Bruin Via Design Milk

Original post:
The world’s first analog 3D printer powered by gravity and weights

LA’s Everytable cafe provides low-income residents a healthy alternative to McDonalds

August 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LA’s Everytable cafe provides low-income residents a healthy alternative to McDonalds

Food deserts and the often exorbitant prices of healthy fare leave low income and working families with few options to feed their families. Everytable is a grab-and-go cafe opening up in downtown and South Los Angeles that will break that mold and offer healthy food with fresh ingredients at an affordable price. Founders Sam Polk and David Foster also run Groceryships , a nonprofit which offers cooking classes and fresh produce gift cards, yet kept getting feedback from families who are often too busy to cook. Instead of families having to rely on the golden arches, the team decided to start a grab-and-go cafe that would reflect fast food ’s pricing, but not its offerings. Related: LA guerrilla gardener Ron Finley turns food deserts into oases Everytable’s prices in South Los Angeles will range from $3-$4, while the downtown spot will cost around $8 for a meal. Each cafe is designed to be profitable on its own, but those who can afford higher prices downtown can dine knowing they are supporting cheaper prices for people in areas who can’t. The food, which includes dishes from Cajun blackened fish to kid’s spaghetti squash with turkey-quinoa meatballs, is prepared at a central kitchen, cutting costs for the cafes. The plan is to have 10 to 20 restaurants open by the year 2017 and then to expand Everytable to other cities. Polk told Fast Company , “We really started digging into this problem of food deserts, and we believe we’ve created a model that has the potential to bring healthy food to every neighborhood in the country. We’re excited to do that as quickly as we can.” +Everytable Via  Fast Company Images via  Everytable

Excerpt from: 
LA’s Everytable cafe provides low-income residents a healthy alternative to McDonalds

Bad Behavior has blocked 3035 access attempts in the last 7 days.